Friday, October 23, 2020

Eureka Bar Owner Decries 'Selective Enforcement' After Knowingly, Repeatedly Violating COVID Orders

Posted By on Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 5:16 PM

The city of Eureka has threatened to fine a local venue as much as $5,000 per violation if it continues with a scheduled burlesque and heavy metal show tomorrow night that would be in violation of state and county COVID-19 health orders, which still prohibit live entertainment performances.
The Siren's Song Tavern in pre-COVID times. - FILE
  • File
  • The Siren's Song Tavern in pre-COVID times.

Eureka Interim City Manager Miles Slattery said city code enforcement officials reached out to Siren’s Song Tavern owner JD Pegg yesterday after the county’s Joint Information Center informed city officials that it had contacted Pegg three times to notify him live performances remain prohibited but the venue had continued to schedule and advertise live shows, including karaoke nights and local bands. The county has tried the education angle to no avail, Slattery said, so the city’s code enforcement unit contacted Pegg to warn he could face fines of up to $5,000 per violation and potentially misdemeanor citations for operation in violation of the county’s health order.

“Hopefully, this gets his attention,” Slattery said. “This guy could care less. It’s just sad to me. First of all, it’s unfair. There’s plenty of other locations that would like to be doing the same but are following the rules. … If they continue to pursue (the show), we’ll have to take further action.”

Reached by the Journal this morning, Pegg, however, contended that if someone is being treated unfairly, it’s him. Striking a defiant tone, Pegg said the state and local orders prohibiting live performances are unfair to venues in comparatively low risk areas of the state, like Humboldt County, and that he’s fallen victim to “selective enforcement” that allows other venues flaunt the rules while he has been repeatedly contacted and threatened with fines.
“You know how much spread we’ve caused? Zero,” he said. “We’ve been doing live events for three fucking months now. Have we caused an outbreak? Has the Fortuna school district that’s been in session for months now? No. … There’s no fucking COVID here. There’s like 17 cases and they’re all at home. They’re not going out for fucking drinks. I don’t deal in hypotheticals, I deal in reality. That’s what all this COVID shit is, is hypothetical.”

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Update: Redwood Fire at 102 Acres, 50 Percent Containment

Posted By and on Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 5:01 PM

CALFIRE
  • CalFire

UPDATE: According to a release from Cal Fire, the Redwood fire is now at 102 acres and is at 50 percent containment.

The fire is located in the Redwood House Road area of Carlotta. The cause of the fire is still under investigation. CalFire is advising residents to stay away from the area because of increased smoke and traffic. Suppression crews will be working in the area for the next couple of days.

Read the full CalFire release at the bottom of the post.

PREVIOUS: A vegetation fire, known as the Redwoods Incident, is burning about a 1/2 mile north of Highway 36 on Redwood House Road between Stevens Creek and Grizzly Creek.

The fire was reported at 12:45 p.m. as an acre fire but by 1 p.m., the fire is now said to be 10 acres spreading quickly with a potential for 50 acres. A full wildland response is rolling out.

UPDATE 1:12 p.m.: The fire is burning downhill at a moderate to a rapid rate of spread and is now about 15 acres estimates the Incident Commander. “It’s starting to transition from the grass to the timber,” the Commander tells dispatch. He requests more resources.

UPDATE 1:19 p.m.: “Approximately 35 acres,” the Incident Commander says to dispatch as he reiterates the fire is moving into the timber.

UPDATE 2:43 p.m.: According to the Incident Commander speaking over the scanner, there is 0 percent containment but the fire is holding within retardant lines at 60-70 acres.

CalFire press release:

The Redwood Incident began on October 23. 2020 at 12:41 PM.  The fire is located in the Redwood House Road Area  of Carlotta.   The fire is currently 102 acres and 50% contained.  The cause is under investigation and there is no current structure threat.  Suppression crews will be working in the area for the next couple of days.  Residents are advised to stay away from the area and there will be increased vehicle traffic and smoke in the area.


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Public Health Confirms One New COVID-19 Case

Posted By on Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 3:43 PM

Humboldt County confirmed one new COVID-19 case today, making 18 this week and a total case count of 562.

Under California Department of Public Health data released Tuesday, Humboldt County remains in the yellow or minimal tier under the state’s “Blueprint for a Safer Economy,” with a positivity rate of 0.5 percent and an adjusted case rate of 1.

But health officials warn a spike in cases would be enough to push Humboldt back into a more restrictive tier.

Right now, under the lower risk category, most indoor businesses — including bars — can reopen but the county can put further restrictions in place, according to the state. Only seven other counties in California are currently in the minimal tier. Read more about what it means here.

Today's results came after 238 test samples were processed with a positivity rate of 0.4 percent. To date, Humboldt County has seen 36 hospitalizations and nine COVID-related deaths, the most recent a 38-year-old man.

According to Johns Hopkins University, nearly 8.4 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed nationally, including 223,752 deaths. Those include 880,724 cases in California, with 17,189 fatalities, according to California Department of Public Health.

The Humboldt County Data Dashboard was updated last week to include hospitalization rates by age group, death rates by age group and case totals by ZIP code, the latter of which are reported in "a range of 0 to 5 for case count until the area surpasses 5 total cases," according to a county news release.

After that threshold has been reached in a ZIP code, the exact number will be included.

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Fire Weather Watch This Weekend; Possible PG&E PSPS

Posted By on Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 2:09 PM

red_flag_warning_oct._25.jpg
The National Weather Service has issued another Red Flag warning for Sunday, Oct. 25 through Tuesday, Oct. 27.

Regions are expected to have east to northeast winds of 20 -30 mph with gusts of up to 50 mph, with very low daytime humidity and "poor to very poor overnight recoveries."

NWS is advising people to take fire safety precautions, avoid pulling off onto grassy areas, discard cigarette butts appropriately, avoid the use of sparks or flames and avoid dragging chains as sparks can ignite a fire.

Meanwhile, a new fire is now burning north of State Route 36 on Redwood House Road between Stevens Creek and Grizzly Creek, which was estimated to be around 60 to 70 acres, just before 3 p.m. (Read more here.)


At the same time, PG&E is monitoring these weather conditions for a possible Public Safety Power Shutoff from Sunday, Oct. 25 with restoration on Wednesday, Oct. 28, that will affect customers in Alderpoint, Ettersburg, Kneeland, Redcrest, Blocksburg, Fort Seward, Miranda, Redway, Bridgeville, Garberville, Myers Flat, Weott, Carlotta, Harris, Petrolia, Whitethorn, Dinsmore, Honeydew and Phillipsville. 

According to a Humboldt County OES release, "PG&E has not released information regarding activating the Humboldt Bay Power Plant in island mode or Community Resource Center information."

The county is advising residents in these areas to begin preparing for the impacts of a possible three-day power outage, including ensuring having adequate batteries, flashlights, non-perishable food and water. Residents are also encouraged to install carbon monoxide detectors with battery backup in central locations on every level of your home.

Read the Humboldt County OES release below.

PG&E is monitoring a weather event late this weekend into early next week and is anticipating a Public Safety Power Shut Off for portions of Humboldt County beginning Sunday, October 25 with restoration anticipated Wednesday, October 28.

Residents in the following areas may lose power during this timeframe:
Alderpoint, Ettersburg, Kneeland, Redcrest, Blocksburg, Fort Seward, Miranda, Redway, Bridgeville, Garberville, Myers Flat, Weott, Carlotta, Harris, Petrolia, Whitethorn, Dinsmore, Honeydew and Phillipsville. 

All notifications and alerts regarding PSPS impacts will come directly from PG&E. Please sign up for those alerts at pgealerts.alerts.pge.com.PG&E has not released information regarding activating the Humboldt Bay Power Plant in island mode or Community Resource Center information. Once that information is available, we will share via our social media platforms.

Residents in these areas should begin preparing for the impacts of a three-day power outage, including ensuring you have adequate batteries, flashlights, non-perishable food and water. Residents are also encouraged to install carbon monoxide detectors with battery backup in central locations on every level of your home.

Learn more about preparing for power outages at ready.gov/power-outages

For more information regarding this upcoming PSPS, visit pge.com/pspsupdates


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APD Arrested Suspect from Last Night's Pursuit

Posted By on Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 12:03 PM

FILE
  • File
Officers from Arcata Police took a suspect into custody this morning who was wanted for multiple counts of allegedly breaking vehicle windows and for fleeing law enforcement in pursuit through city streets, out Highway 255, and into a field before fleeing on foot.

Officers weren’t able to locate the suspect at that time.
However, Sgt. Keith Altizer said this morning that when the tow truck arrived about 8 a.m. to get the suspect’s vehicle, the driver saw someone fleeing the area. Officers again attempted to locate the suspect but he eluded detection.

But, Altizer said, just before 10 a.m., an officer saw someone running alongside Hwy 255 between Pacheco and V Street. Officers converged on the area and captured the suspect, Jesse Lohmeier, by about 10:10 a.m.

Yesterday evening, in reaction to an argument at 1700 block of Iverson Avenue in Arcata, Lohmeier is alleged to have broken multiple car windows in the area before fleeing in a vehicle to the North Coast Co-op and attacking more vehicle windows in that area. As officers converged on that area, Lohmeier is alleged to have led them on a chase through city streets. At one point he backed rapidly at an Arcata Police vehicle, Sgt. Altizer alleged, causing the officer to believe his vehicle would be hit, but Lohmeier narrowly evaded it.

After capture this morning, Lohmeier is being charged with multiple accounts of alleged vandalism, felony evading and driving on a suspended license.

Sgt. Altizer said that so far they know of at least five vehicles vandalized by Lohmeier and they believe there are more. He asked that if anyone’s vehicle was damaged at the North Coast Co-op or if anyone has more information about the incident, please contact the Arcata Police at (707) 822-2428.
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Thursday, October 22, 2020

Why do we keep voting on this? Exploring Prop. 13’s ‘Tax Revolt Family Tree’

Posted By on Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 6:56 PM

Illustration by Anne Wernikoff for CalMatters; istock, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association - CALMATTERS
  • CalMatters
  • Illustration by Anne Wernikoff for CalMatters; istock, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association

The tax revolt started in California in 1978, but it never really ended.

Four decades ago mad-as-hell voters banded together to pass Proposition 13, capping property taxes, slapping a constitutional muzzle on state government and wringing local budgets like a washcloth. The electorate’s anti-tax fever may have broken in the years since, but the legacy of Prop. 13 is still very much with us. 

Need proof? Check your ballot. 

This year, Californians are being asked to weigh in on two more changes to the tax-slashing constitutional amendment that has done more than any other California ballot measure to reshape the state’s fiscal landscape and the politics of taxation. 

Proposition 19 would pop open one new property tax loophole for older or disabled homeowners, while sewing shut another for people who inherit their parents’ and grandparents’ homes. And Proposition 15 would raise property taxes on many businesses — the largest change to California’s property tax structure since Prop. 13 campaign leader Howard Jarvis was railing against high taxes and “marinated bureaucrats.”

If it seems like California voters are perpetually being asked to redefine, clarify, overhaul or rewrite the terms of the 1978 tax revolt, it’s because we are. Since Prop. 13, the state has voted 33 times on potential amendments to it. These offshoots of Prop. 13 have sprouted their own offshoots, adding additions to revisions to edits of the original text. Forty-two years later, the tree first planted in 1978 has gotten mighty tangled.

“It’s an evergreen story,” said Jason Cohn, whose Jarvis documentary The First Angry Man, premiered last week. Cohn and his wife, Camille Servan-Schreiber, began working on the film in 2010 when voters were considering Proposition 26 — a successful Prop. 13 patch that made it even harder for state and local governments to raise revenue through fees.

“It’s never not relevant,” said Cohn.

There are few areas of California economic or political life that Prop. 13 hasn’t touched. To recap, it:

  • Capped property taxes at 1% of a property’s assessed value
  • Fixed a property’s assessed value to its original purchase price (rather than how much it can be currently sold for)
  • Allowed that assessed value to inch up with inflation, but by no more than 2% each year
  • Allowed a property to be reassessed whenever it is sold or if the owner makes a significant improvement or addition
  • Required local and state governments — and in some cases voters — to get two-thirds of the vote to introduce new taxes

In the short term, the measure gave homeowners a lasting tax cut and, amid skyrocketing real estate prices, made it much easier for homeowners to stay in their homes. In exchange, property tax payments plummeted 60% in a year, cutting $7 billion from city and school district budgets. 

Longer term, Prop. 13 had a number of unintended consequences. State government assumed a much bigger role in school financing. Local governments suddenly had a bigger incentive to approve commercial real estate over residential development. Governments across California turned to other sources of revenue — including income taxes, use taxes and fees — to make up the difference. 

The Prop. 13 campaign reverberated across the country. Jarvis, the garrulous, cigar-chomping political gadfly who had been tilting at California’s tax code, Don Quixote-like, for decades, became a magazine cover-gracing populist hero overnight. Tax-capping measures sprouted up elsewhere, augering the landslide election of Ronald Reagan. In its wake, Jerry Brown, the state’s governor at the time, came to rebrand himself a “born-again tax cutter” — one of many Democrats who would see “taxation” and “government spending” as four letter words for decades to come.

“The era of the tax revolt, I think, has largely ended in California,” said Cohn. “But Prop. 13 has its own status outside that liberal-conservative spectrum.”

Of the 33 changes put before the voters, 24 have passed. They come in three varieties:

1. Perk Protectors

Under Prop. 13, a home’s value is reassessed whenever there’s a change of ownership or the property owner makes an addition or improvement. Property owners can find themselves slapped with a much higher tax bill if they opt to fix up their current place or move to a new one. As soon as Prop. 13 passed, people began scrambling for exemptions.

If someone is forced to move after a natural disaster, don’t they deserve a tax break? What if someone inherits a home from a parent — is California going to impose an orphan’s tax? And what about the responsible homeowner who installs a sprinkler system? A solar panel? A rain barrel? 

Since 1978, the vast majority of the Prop. 13-related initiatives have carved out highly specific exemptions for niche investments and transactions, expanding the tax break’s protections one ballot measure at a time. 

2. Rulemakers

Another key feature of Prop. 13: Legislators hoping to raise taxes need to convince two-thirds of their colleagues to agree. For local taxes, two-thirds of voters are needed to approve “special taxes.”

But what if the taxes were used to pay off debt? If a regulator imposes a fee or a fine, is that a “tax” too? And what’s a “special tax” anyway? 

Eight more measures have gone before the California voter to answer such questions.

3. Tax hikers

Proposition 13 makes it really hard for governments to raise revenue. That was the point. So when interest groups are particularly strapped, sometimes they go to the voters directly asking for a loophole. 

Despite everything, Prop. 13 still retains its basic structure, said Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, one of the state’s most influential anti-tax groups. Property taxes are still capped at 1% of a property’s value, they can increase by only 2% each year and reassessment still occurs only with an ownership change or upgrade. “Those are the three legs of the stool and those have not changed,” said Coupal.

What makes Prop. 13 such a moving target, constantly in need of more modest revisions and clarifications, he said, is its brevity. The 1978 effort took place before California proposition campaigns became the half-a-billion-dollar, professionalized business they are today. 

Jarvis and his co-drafters “were not insiders and they wanted a quick immediate fix that was really needed at the time,” said Coupal. “It was sparse…so there were a lot of unanswered questions. You can criticize Prop. 13 for that but remember, the United States Bill of Rights is very sparse too.”

Darien Shanske, a law professor at UC Davis, agrees that Prop. 13’s repeat presence on the ballot is a product of the way that it was written. But he doesn’t liken its lack of specificity to the genius of the Founding Fathers.

Overly-strict in some places and ambiguous in others, the measure “was particularly poorly drafted,” he said, which has led to continual efforts to prune or graft modifications onto it. That’s to say nothing of the frequent court battles over its precise meaning. 

Critics of ballot box budgeting contend that the Legislature is better equipped than voters to make complex taxation and spending decisions, and believe Prop. 13 has resulted in an infuriating catch-22. By making it more difficult for lawmakers to raise taxes, Prop. 13 makes it more likely that increases will require yet another ballot measure. And because constitutional amendments can only be changed through the popular vote, any direct changes to Prop. 13 have to go before the voters.

Tax policy and refined spending decisions shouldn’t be done within the Constitution, Shanske said — “but once we’ve started down this road, we’re stuck with it because now we can’t fix it except through the Constitution.”

Via the Post It, CalMatters political reporter Ben Christopher shares frequent updates from the (socially distanced) 2020 campaign trail.

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Felony Hit and Run in Eureka

Posted By on Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 6:35 PM

Emergency personnel are loading the victim into the ambulance as of 6:21 p.m. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • Emergency personnel are loading the victim into the ambulance as of 6:21 p.m.
A person is injured and unconscious but still breathing after a vehicle struck them at A Street on Fourth Street in Eureka and fled about 6:10 p.m. An EPD officer is on the scene with the victim who is still on the road. An ambulance was asked to respond to Code 3 (with lights and siren) to the scene.

The dispatcher reported that the suspect vehicle was likely a gold Toyota Celica.

Please remember that information gathered from initial reports is subject to revision as more facts become available.
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County Confirms Two New COVID-19 Cases

Posted By on Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 4:38 PM

Humboldt County Public Health reported two new confirmed cases of COVID-19 today and also that a previously reported case has been reassigned to another county, bringing Humboldt's total case count to 561.

The county also announced that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control has updated its definition of "close contact" to a COVID-19 case, now defining it as someone who was with 6 feet of known case for a total of 15 minutes or more within a 24-hour period starting from two days before the onset of symptoms or a positive test for asymptomatic cases.

Humboldt County Health Officer Teresa Frankovich said in a press release that the change illustrates one of the reasons the state of California is still not allowing large events, festivals or live performances of any kind.

“This change really highlights how the science is constantly evolving as we learn about this virus.” she said. “One of the things we do know is that the surest way to keep our businesses open and children in school is to follow state and local orders and refrain from hosting or attending live events, get-togethers or any other gathering that brings more than three households together.”

Under California Department of Public Health data released Tuesday, Humboldt County remains in the yellow or minimal tier under the state’s “Blueprint for a Safer Economy,” with a positivity rate of 0.5 percent and an adjusted case rate of 1.

But health officials warn a spike in cases would be enough to push Humboldt back into a more restrictive tier.

Right now, under the lower risk category, most indoor businesses — including bars — can reopen but the county can put further restrictions in place, according to the state. Only seven other counties in California are currently in the minimal tier. Read more about what it means here.

Today's results came after 250 test samples were processed with a positivity rate of 0.8 percent. To date, Humboldt County has seen 36 hospitalizations and nine COVID-related deaths, the most recent a 38-year-old man.

According to Johns Hopkins University, nearly 8.4 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed nationally, including 222,940 deaths. Those include 877,784 cases in California, with 17,027 fatalities, according to California Department of Public Health.
The Humboldt County Data Dashboard was updated last week to include hospitalization rates by age group, death rates by age group and case totals by ZIP code, the latter of which are reported in "a range of 0 to 5 for case count until the area surpasses 5 total cases," according to a county news release.

After that threshold has been reached in a ZIP code, the exact number will be included.

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Local Tribes Sponsor Day of Action for Removal of Klamath Dams

Posted By on Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 4:31 PM

SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
Members of the Karuk, Yurok, Klamath and Hoopa Valley Tribes including different organizations throughout the U.S. are sponsoring a day of action for the removal of the Klamath dams on Friday, Oct. 23, demanding that Warren Buffet, owner of PacifiCorp and the Klamath River dams, keep his promise to remove the four dams.

In 2016, PacifiCorp had agreed to remove the hydroelectric dams from the Klamath River, however, in July the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ruled that PacifiCorp could not simply hand-off the dams to a nonprofit created to remove them, which left the corporation wanting to renegotiate the terms of the agreement of the removal of the dams, halting a four-year battle to get the dams removed.

“It’s clear to us that Pacificorp is intentionally stalling the dam removal process in order to hold on to these monuments of colonialism and tools of genocide,” said  Yurok Tribal member, Annelia Hillman from the Klamath Justice Coalition. “They have an opportunity to set an example for how corporate America should treat
communities of color and Native Tribes. Instead they seem determined to destroy salmon, communities, and economies at the expense of their own customers. We refuse to accept this fate. The dams must come down.”
day_of_action_2.jpg

To join the virtual rally at 3:3o p.m., register at tinyurl.com/Mobilize4water. For more information on the Klamath Justice Coalition and other events visit californiasalmon.org.

Read the full press release below.

Warren Buffett Target of Klamath River Day of Action

Tribal people, Fishermen, Conservationists Will Host Actions in at least four major cities and online calling for Klamath Dam Removal on Oct. 23rd

Klamath, California - Members of the Karuk, Yurok, Klamath and Hoopa Valley Tribes, fishermen, Klamath river users, and non-government organizations from throughout the nation are sponsoring a day of action for Klamath dam removal on October 23. They are demanding that Warren Buffet, the owner of  Pacific Power and the Klamath River dams, keep his promise to remove the dams.

“It’s clear to us that Pacificorp is intentionally stalling the dam removal process in order to hold on to these monuments of colonialism and tools of genocide,” said Yurok Tribal member, Annelia Hillman from the Klamath Justice Coalition. “They have an opportunity to set an example for how corporate America should treat communities of color and Native Tribes. Instead they seem determined to destroy salmon, communities, and economies at the expense of their own customers. We refuse to accept this fate. The dams must come down!”

The groups are calling on  everyone who is committed to the survival of Pacific Salmon, Native American rights and clean water  to join them. A virtual rally and COVID-safe actions are being planned in several cities, includingWarren Buffett’s hometown Omaha, Nebraska. The day of action will also include educational outreach and efforts to block Berkshire Hathaway from brokering business deals in other cities. People and organizations from Seattle, Portland, Oregon, Klamath, Washington DC, San Diego and other cities plan to participate.

“Tribal members are not going to allow corporate America to break agreements and contracts with our people in the same manner as the United States has with treaties.” said Thomas Joseph, a Hoopa Valley Tribal member who is driving to Omaha to rally with Nebraska Tribes. “Warren Buffet and Berkshire Hathaway have agreed to these dam removals and they must keep their word.”

The plan to remove four lower Klamath River dams appeared to be on track to start by 2022 until July 16, 2020, when the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) made the decision to partially transfer the Klamath dams to a dam removal entity and conditioned that PacifiCorp remained a co-licensee. Now, PacifiCorp says they might not remove the dams despite having collected $200 million from its ratepayers dam removal. The State of California has also earmarked $250 million in bond funding to support the project. PacifiCorp has indicated it is concerned about the potential for ongoing liability if it remains on the dam license when the facilities are removed.

“PacifiCorp committed to taking down the Klamath River dams by 2020. They collected the money to remove the dams and received state permits for dam removal, but now claim the deal is not good enough," said Regina Chichizola from Save California Salmon. "Buffett is the fourth richest man in the world. One of Berkshire Hathaway’s top shareholders is the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Gates is the second richest man in the world. The nonprofit charged with removing the dams has already developed the most comprehensive liability protection packages for any dam removal project in history. We will not allow them to act like upstanding members of their own communities, while they destroy ours. We encourage everyone to plan actions online, and off, and to post videos, photos and their messages using the hashtag #UnDamtheKlamath.”

The Klamath dams promote the growth of toxic algae and contribute to  the collapse of Chinook and coho salmon runs. This has devastated sport, commercial and tribal fishing in the Klamath River and all along the California coast.

Chichizola added that organizers will also join people from the City of San Diego to oppose Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Energy’s bid to take over the City of San Diego’s power system. "The City of San Diego should understand that Berkshire Hathaway Energy is not a reliable partner,” she continued. “In addition to constantly moving the ball in negotiations over Klamath dam removal, BHE’s PacifiCorp was sued for starting one, or more, of Oregon and California’s recent wildfires. People who have experience with this company know that they care about profits, not people.”

Save California Salmon's virtual action effort is part of their Mobilizing Water Justice Week of Action with Humboldt State University Native American Studies Department, which will occur every day at 3:30 p.m. from Oct. 19-23 and take on issues such environmental racism in California water decisions, the Delta Tunnels’ impacts on native people, climate and fire, safe drinking water and saving the Klamath salmon. The public can register to attend these virtual events at tinyurl.com/Mobilize4water .

The Klamath Justice Coalition and other organizations will also be hosting vital and in-person actions all day. More information is at californiasalmon.org, @CaliSalmon on Twitter California Rivers on Instagram and Save California Salmon and Klamath Justice Coalition on Facebook. Supporters can register for the event at: tinyul.com/Mobilize4Water.
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Robbery at Bayshore Mall

Posted By on Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 4:02 PM

FILE
  • FILE
The Eureka Police Department is looking for two white male adults and a woman in a white 2003 Chevy Tahoe after a robbery at the Bayshore Mall around 2 p.m. The vehicle reportedly headed south on Broadway after the robbery.

One of the suspects had a knife and the other may have a firearm, according to the BOLO sent over the scanner.

Please remember that information gathered from initial reports is subject to revision as more facts become available.

Around 2:18 p.m. the vehicle was located at Pine and Wabash but is not occupied, according to an officer speaking over the scanner.

Read a Eureka Police Department release below.

On today’s date just before 2:00 p.m., officers with the Eureka Police Department responded to the 3300 block of Broadway for the report of a robbery that occurred in the parking lot.  Based on the preliminary investigation, it appears the victims and suspects were loosely known to each other and in a vehicle together.  For an unknown reason, two males in the vehicle presented a firearm and a knife and demanded money from the victims.  The suspects fled in a white 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe with an undisclosed amount of cash.

Officers located the unoccupied suspect vehicle a short time later near Pine and West Wabash.  This is an ongoing investigation and officers are working to identify the involved suspects.

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