Outdoors

Thursday, January 16, 2020

North Coast Night Lights: Harry the Honorable Hound Dog

Posted By on Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 2:32 PM

Complete with 3-D ears, tongue and bone, “Harry, my Honorable Hound Dog” watches the cars go by from his spot on Buhne Street at the corner with Harrison Avenue. He never chases, barks or bites. Utility box painting by Benjamin Goulart, photographed on January 1, 2020. Eureka, Humboldt County, California. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • Complete with 3-D ears, tongue and bone, “Harry, my Honorable Hound Dog” watches the cars go by from his spot on Buhne Street at the corner with Harrison Avenue. He never chases, barks or bites. Utility box painting by Benjamin Goulart, photographed on January 1, 2020. Eureka, Humboldt County, California.
Growing up, I didn’t think of Eureka as beautiful. Never mind that I was a kid, and what would I know about that? Maybe I simply wasn’t tapped in to the art scene, I don’t know, but I don’t recall driving down the street and seeing so many interesting art pieces, or art being as accessible in so many venues as now. I remember the larger than life sculptures on the bay side of U.S. Highway 101 north of Eureka. They fascinated the kid I was. But with apologies to the current Eureka in which I live, the feeling that would greet me as a child when my family drove us to town was a depressing dinginess. Permeating everything, standing out from my memories of those times, was the plume of vapor ever rising from the pulp mill on the peninsula, the pall that quite literally put the “reek” in Eureka.

But Eureka has metamorphosed. Now, driving through town one sees many murals, painted utility boxes and sculptures sprinkled about, and despite relying on kid memories for comparison, it feels as though a lot has changed inside Eureka. A great many businesses display local art and the people come out in droves for Arts Alive every month. The transformation of Eureka has largely been organic, changed gradually and inexorably over decades by the huge numbers of creative people living here. I’m glad to be one of them. The city of Eureka itself has helped spur the change, especially recently, and is now one of fourteen officially designated California Cultural Districts.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

North Coast Night Lights: Vacancy at 4th & E Streets, Eureka

Posted By on Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 10:21 AM

banner-2020-01-01_bench-4th_e_2500px.jpg
For years, driving by, I would see her lonely figure sitting on the bench. I never stopped, but in time I grew used to her presence there and I would look to touch base visually when I passed. Huddled inward and completely covered, she had erected a shell between herself and the outside world, perhaps retreating to the safety of her own thoughts to live in a world of her own choosing. I could identify with that on some level.

I don’t recall ever seeing what she looked like, for in my recollection she was always completely covered. She was consistently there for years, eventually becoming a part of that corner. And then, without realizing when exactly the transition occurred, I began noticing that she was no longer there. The bench was empty. A part of the corner felt missing.

The corner has long called to me to come photograph it some night. The street corner itself is stylish as street corners go, now that the utility box near the bench has been painted as part of Eureka’s utility box beautification project (its handle is at the right edge of the image). The curved wood and iron bench is fashionable and smart. There is a small shade tree, which was out of view behind me, and beneath everything a classic brick sidewalk ties it all together. I had thought to photograph the scene in its entirety, but looking into the camera’s viewfinder it felt like something was missing from the composition. It was the woman on her bench. What ever became of her? I didn’t know. And then oddly, almost by necessity, everything fell away as the mystery of the empty bench drew me to it. The missing element became the subject, and I photographed an empty bench.
a-2020-01-01_bench-4th_e_1800px.jpg
I shared the image in one of Humboldt County’s Facebook pages, thinking maybe someone would see the empty bench and remember the person who used to occupy it. I was amazed to find an outpouring of heartwarming stories from people who had noticed her there and remembered her. In a flood of personal tales, people told their stories of meeting the woman or simply of being accustomed to seeing her there. Many shared feelings about the empty bench left behind. It touched the humanity within me that so many people had noticed her, and that she had become such a part of that place for so many. The corner without the woman is an outdoor art exhibit, a living installation with its shade tree, a brick sidewalk, a three-dimensional mural and a pretty bench — and for a long time a living human was a part of it, and her absence was felt by many.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Friday, January 3, 2020

The Biggest Wave and Bomb Cyclone: A Record-Breaking Year of Wild Weather

Posted By on Fri, Jan 3, 2020 at 3:57 PM

Looking back at 2019 from a weather standpoint, things were a bit on the wild side at times. So, the Journal reached out to climate specialist Matthew Kidwell in the Eureka office of the National Weather Service, who compiled what he saw as the most notable weather incidents to take place last year.

Along with those events, 2019 hit a record for breaking records, with 18 total set, according to Kidwell, that included 11 high temps and seven minimum temps.

The closest other years were 2004 and 2014, which saw 10 and nine record highs, respectively. But 2013 edged out 2019 to stay in the lead for most minimum records at 10.

Damaging Waves in Shelter Cove: On Jan. 17, waves upward of 30 feet crashed into eight homes on Lower Pacific Drive in Shelter Cove causing extensive damage, included flooding, mud covered floors, broken windows and ruined furniture.

Cheryl Antony, spokesperson for Shelter Cove Fire, told Redheaded Blackbelt at the time that one of the homes had approximately 10 broken windows and some had up to 4 inches of water inside.
A member of Shelter Cove Fire inspects the damage including water on the floor of this custom-built home. - CHERYL ANTONY OF SHELTER COVE FIRE
  • Cheryl Antony of Shelter Cove Fire
  • A member of Shelter Cove Fire inspects the damage including water on the floor of this custom-built home.
“We had to put life jackets on to walk around [to assess damage],” Antony said. “We have never seen waves like this before. One came over the whole deck we were standing on. We had to run.”


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

North Coast Night Lights: 2019 Night Light in Review

Posted By on Fri, Jan 3, 2020 at 11:03 AM

The stars arc across the sky in their nightly parade in this view looking south from Boat Launch Beach, or Indian Beach, beneath the town of Trinidad, California. The star trails you see are the result of the stars’ motion across the sky during this several-minute exposure of the camera. In summer months the sky in this view would contain the core of our galaxy, the visually richest portion of the Milky Way. January, 2019. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • The stars arc across the sky in their nightly parade in this view looking south from Boat Launch Beach, or Indian Beach, beneath the town of Trinidad, California. The star trails you see are the result of the stars’ motion across the sky during this several-minute exposure of the camera. In summer months the sky in this view would contain the core of our galaxy, the visually richest portion of the Milky Way. January, 2019.
We live in the Milky Way galaxy. It’s a flattened pinwheel shape, and our solar system is out on one of the arms. Our galaxy gets its name from the bright band of stars called the Milky Way, which we can see stretching across the night sky. The band is an edge-on view of our galaxy from within the galaxy; it is what we see as we look through the thick part of the pinwheel comprising all of the stars, nebulae and everything else that lie between us and the other side of the galaxy. When one looks into the night sky to either side of the Milky Way’s band, we are looking outward from the galaxy’s plane. Here there are fewer stars, and beyond them lies the great space between galaxies.

The brightest, most detailed area of the Milky Way is the galactic core. We can’t always see the core because as Earth moves around our sun in its year-long trek, each night of the year our dark side faces a slightly different view of the sky. As a result, some times of the year the core of Milky Way is not in view at night. During winter in the northern hemisphere, Earth’s night side faces the fainter stretches of the Milky Way. As we leave winter and spring approaches, we begin to have a view of the core in the early pre-dawn hours. The Milky Way will rise earlier each morning; toward the end of May the Milky Way’s position in the sky at 1:30 a.m. is similar to the pre-dawn view of late March. In late June, the core will be low on the southeastern horizon when darkness falls, and it will be higher in the sky each night immediately after dark through the summer.
In a few of the images through the year I have labeled celestial points in the sky. While the Milky Way and stars always follow the same paths across our skies through the seasons, the planets move independently against the starry backdrop. They travel in their own orbits around our sun, and because they’re closer to us than the stars are (by a lot), their independent motion relative to us causes them to move across the otherwise fixed star field. It’s the same principal at work as when you look into the distance and sway from side to side: you will see nearer objects appear to move back and forth relative to more distant objects. This year we had Jupiter and Saturn straddling the Milky Way all season; next year they’ll both be close together to the left of the Milky Way. Last year Mars was close to the Milky Way, but nowhere near it this year.

The night sky is fascinating in its variations. Here on the North Coast, we are blessed to live in an area where the skies are dark enough to enjoy its bejeweled wonders, and we are fortunate that it is not yet too crowded with space junk. Please enjoy these image of Night Light from our precious North Coast from the year 2019 just gone by.


To keep abreast of David Wilson’s most current photography or peer into its past, visit or contact him at his website mindscapefx.com or follow him on Instagram at @david_wilson_mfx .
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Monday, December 30, 2019

High Surf Warning This Week

Posted By on Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 3:08 PM

Starting today and building up in height through Thursday, the Eureka office of the National Weather Service is warning that “large, steep” waves will be washing up local beaches and over jetties this week.

According to NWS, the waves will begin building 17 to 20 feet today and should reach up to 25 feet by Wednesday, heights which are expected to continue for another day.
large_surf_two.png
The NWS warns folks to “stay back from the surf and off of jetties and rocks.”
For weather information visit www.weather.gov/eka/marine. For buoy observations check www.ndbc.noaa.gov/.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, December 24, 2019

North Coast Night Lights: Holiday Magic

Posted By on Tue, Dec 24, 2019 at 11:46 AM

It certainly looked a lot like Christmas in Old Town, Eureka. I’d gone down to photograph some nighttime holiday lights, and what should happen by but a wooden Santa ornament.  It hobbled stiffly out of the store as if nothing were amiss, and I swear I heard it muttering about the Christmas rush. Then he paused to peer into the window display at Many Hands Gallery, cocking his wooden head from side to side on his stocky neck. Suddenly he chuckled, threw me a wink, and scuttled quickly back inside. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • It certainly looked a lot like Christmas in Old Town, Eureka. I’d gone down to photograph some nighttime holiday lights, and what should happen by but a wooden Santa ornament. It hobbled stiffly out of the store as if nothing were amiss, and I swear I heard it muttering about the Christmas rush. Then he paused to peer into the window display at Many Hands Gallery, cocking his wooden head from side to side on his stocky neck. Suddenly he chuckled, threw me a wink, and scuttled quickly back inside.
I’m used to odd things. I especially love when they visit me during the holidays, those special times when people want to do good things, and odd things find a welcome home. These times bring out the magical things; one doesn’t usually find Santa or the elves or Easter bunnies running about outside of their respective holidays.

But it’s all fair game during a holiday. My family put up our tree earlier this week, a little later than normal. My favorite ornaments are a little set of wooden Santas, elves, angels, sleighs, snowpeople, and the like. I’ve always felt closest to the Santas, cute little two and three quarter-inch figurines that remind me of the stop-motion Christmas specials of my childhood. They’re the things of which dreams are made, and the tiny figures danced and played in my dreams that night.
Festive lighting and Ferndale’s great Christmas tree lent holiday vibes to Ferndale’s Main Street. My wife kept a lookout for cars while I captured the image. December 19, 2019 in Humboldt County, California. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • Festive lighting and Ferndale’s great Christmas tree lent holiday vibes to Ferndale’s Main Street. My wife kept a lookout for cars while I captured the image. December 19, 2019 in Humboldt County, California.
Later in the week my wife and I traveled into Ferndale to find some holiday night light and see what magic might be about in town to photograph. Main Street Ferndale was beautiful, a fully decked-out corridor with lights adorning most of the stores. The towering Christmas tree at the end of the street was visible for many blocks. But periodic showers kept most people inside, and they sent us home before I’d quite gotten what I wanted. I wanted magic, but that kind of thing has to come along when it’s ready.

A couple nights after our Ferndale visit I found myself down in Old Town Eureka. Many businesses were cleverly illuminated for the holidays and open for business, but many were not. I ended up outside the particularly beautiful windows of Many Hands Gallery at about 8p.m. With the view down the sidewalk and the glow from the window it gave me the best window/sidewalk/view I could find for a holiday photograph.
Evening holiday foragers found interesting things in Mind’s Eye Manufactory & Coffee Lounge in Ferndale on December 19, 2019. Look closely, for they were turned to blurs by the camera’s long exposure. Humboldt County, California. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • Evening holiday foragers found interesting things in Mind’s Eye Manufactory & Coffee Lounge in Ferndale on December 19, 2019. Look closely, for they were turned to blurs by the camera’s long exposure. Humboldt County, California.
But magic wasn’t happening yet… the photo needed something, or it needed someone, to give the foreground a story element. I was on the point of posing myself for the photo just to get something into the foreground when the strangest thing happened. I could swear even now that it had been a dream like those from the other night, but for the photographic evidence my camera recorded.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Friday, December 13, 2019

UPDATE: Possible Flooding at High Tide Today Due to High Surf

Posted By on Fri, Dec 13, 2019 at 11:17 AM

nwswarning.png
UPDATE:

Heads up, the Eureka office of the National Weather Service is reporting that some lower lying areas could see minor flooding as high tide hits around 11:40 a.m. due to large surf.

Among those most likely to be affected are zones around Humboldt Bay, “particularly” King Salmon and the Arcata Bottom.

PREVIOUS:

The Eureka office of the National Weather Service has issued a high surf advisory for early Thursday morning through Friday afternoon.

According to the office, a “significant swell” will hit the local coast, sending “large breaking waves” high onto beaches and over jetties and rocks. The 18- to 21-foot waves will also create hazardous conditions around the entrance to Humboldt Bay.

“Beachgoers should use extra caution when venturing closer to the surf zone,” the NWS Facebook post states, describing Thursday and Friday as "dangerous beach days."
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , ,

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Intense Effort to Rescue Injured Hoopa Forestry Service Worker

Posted By on Wed, Dec 11, 2019 at 9:03 AM

Scrambling back uphill after the rescue. - PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ROB MENDES
  • Photos provided by Rob Mendes
  • Scrambling back uphill after the rescue.
At times the crews intent on assisting an injured forestry service worker in the Big Hill Road area of Hoopa on Monday had to crawl through brush on their hands and knees, said Rod Mendes, chief of Hoopa Fire and Office of Emergency Services.

He said that while the rescue began at 9:30 in the morning, the crews didn’t make it back to their vehicles until after 6:30 that night.

Although the first reports from yesterday’s accident scene said the Hoopa Tribe forestry worker had slipped 300 feet, Mendes said that really the worker had “only” fallen about 25-30 feet.

“He was doing forest inventory work and slipped,” Mendes said.

The hike down to the injured man took about an hour — with firefighters, paramedics and Tribal Police officers scrambling and occasionally sliding on their rear ends to reach the accident victim.

“It was like a rain forest down in there,” Mendes said. “The vegetation is so thick.”

Once there, the paramedics decided a helicopter needed to be brought to hoist the victim out of the ravine in a Stokes basket.

“His vitals were getting worse,” Mendes said. “He was getting cold.”

The crew moved the victim up the hill and cleared a spot with chainsaws. “The helicopter wasn’t going to land,” Mendes said. “But, for safety, an area has to be clear around where a patient is being hoisted.”

“[In other places], they’ve had instances where the victim has swung into trees,” he said. “You got to have an area that is clear.”

The crew dropped multiple 40 or 50 foot trees, according to Mendes. “It took 2.5 hours to fall the trees.”

When the helicopter arrived, a “hook” was dropped and the rescue basket containing the patient was hoisted into the helicopter. “Once they start reeling him in, it doesn’t take long,” Mendes said. The injured worker was then taken to the hospital about 2:15 p.m. Fortunately, he was able to leave the hospital that night.


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , ,

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

No Local Crab Before the New Year

Posted By on Tue, Dec 10, 2019 at 4:52 PM

Another crab season, another delay. - C. JUHASZ/CDFW WEBSITE
  • C. Juhasz/CDFW website
  • Another crab season, another delay.
The commercial Dungeness crab season off of Humboldt, Mendocino and Del Norte counties has been delayed again at least until Dec. 31 due quality tests that “continue to show crab are below the minimum testing guidelines.”

According to a California Department of Fish and Wildlife release, another round of testing will take place around Dec. 20 to determine whether the New Year’s Eve opening is a go or another delay until Jan. 15 is in order.

“No vessel may take or land crab in an area closed for a meat quality delay (i.e., Fish and Game districts 6, 7, 8 and 9),” the release states. “In addition, any vessel that takes, possesses onboard or lands crab from ocean waters outside of a delayed area is prohibited from participating in the crab fishery in the delayed area for 30 days following the opening of that area.”

In other news, CDFW reports a warning on sports caught crab in the Shelter Cove to Point Arena zone was lifted after new tests show the level of domoic acid at low to undetectable levels in the area.

“Although there are currently no areas under an active health advisory for Dungeness crab in the state, CDPH recommends consumers follow best practices to avoid any inadvertent exposure to domoic acid that might be sporadically found in the crab viscera,” the release states.

The Sonoma County and south commercial fishery, which had been delayed due to concerns about marine life entanglements, will open Dec. 15.

Read the CDFW update below:


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Lone Swan Graces Benbow

Posted By on Wed, Dec 4, 2019 at 11:03 AM

The swan at Benbow. - TALIA ROSE
  • Talia Rose
  • The swan at Benbow.
A lone swan is swimming on the Eel River at Benbow.
Though swans are not unknown in the area, it is somewhat rare to see one in Southern Humboldt. The swans breed and raise their young in Arctic areas at the tip of the North American continent. Then they migrate south to winter on estuaries found along the coast of California and on the rice fields and wild wetlands in the Central Valley.
TALIA ROSE
  • Talia Rose
This single bird though has drifted down to float like a solitary snowflake on the
Eel River near the Benbow Inn. Local wildlife photographer Talia Rose was also able to capture some shots of the graceful bird, saying on her Facebook page County Line Wild that the swan had been at the location for a few days.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Recent Comments

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2020 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation