Outdoors

Thursday, May 13, 2021

Redwood Sky Walk Opening Delayed

Posted By on Thu, May 13, 2021 at 5:26 PM

A platform on the Redwood Sky Walk. - EDDY ALEXANDER ON BEHALF OF THE CITY OF EUREKA
  • Eddy Alexander on behalf of the city of Eureka
  • A platform on the Redwood Sky Walk.
The soft opening of the Redwood Sky Walk at the Sequoia Park Zoo, originally scheduled for tomorrow, is being delayed due windy conditions in recent days.

“While the Redwood Sky Walk has been specially engineered to withstand many adverse weather events, the structure is attached to living trees. Because of the many natural and manmade variables at play, the zoo has put aggressive protocols in place to thoroughly check the structure when extreme weather conditions present opportunities for unusual strain,” Zoo Director Gretchen Zeigler said in an announcement. “It’s truly unfortunate that local wind conditions over the past few days have forced us to implement our closing procedures and delay our long-awaited softopening plans. But, the safety of our guests will always be our top priority. These precautionary measures are in place for moments such as this.”

The Eureka office of the National Weather Service is forecasting winds between 7 to 10 mph tomorrow and up to 14 mph hour on Saturday.

Previously announced price increases for zoo entry will not go into effect until the walkway opens. More information on when that will happen is expected to be available next week. A grand opening celebration is scheduled for June 4 to June 6.

The 100-foot-high suspended pathways through the trees is the longest in the western United States, according to the zoo, at just under a fourth of a mile to the end and back.

In the meantime, check out photos of the new attraction below:
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Thursday, May 6, 2021

Condo of Condors Making Themselves at Home, Causing Quite a Scene

Posted By on Thu, May 6, 2021 at 4:39 PM

With the countdown on to the first California condors making their way back to the wilds of Humboldt County in a century, a group of the endangered birds — a gathering known as a "condo" or a "scarcity"  — has taken a liking to one woman's deck, roof and yard, apparently creating quite the scene.

About 15 to 20 of the birds have made themselves at home for the last several days, according to the daughter of the inland Southern California homeowner, who has been documenting the condor congregation saga on Twitter, capturing the attention of several media outlets, including SF Gate and the New York Times.

The extremely rare event is made even more extraordinary considering there were only 22 of the majestic birds left back in 1982, a fact not lost on the family.
The SF Gate article (written by former Journal staffer Ashley Harrell) quotes a response from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Twitter account, which notes the woman's home, which the Times reports is in the Tehachapi Mountains, is part of the bird's historic range and offers some advice.

“Unfortunately, [condors] sometimes perceive houses and decks as suitable perch locations,” the response states. “If this happens again, hazing to preclude them from causing damage and habituation is encouraged.”

Suggested deterrents include using a water hose or yelling and clapping. According to the daughter, who goes by Seana Lyn on Twitter, her mother went for the former and it seems to have brought some success, sending the condors to the trees.

Intelligent birds with a wingspan of nearly 10 feet, condors are highly social and often roost in groups.

Tianna Williams-Claussen, a Yurok tribal member and wildlife biologist who has been working on the local recovery project since its inception more than a decade ago, told the Journal back in May of 2019, they are "very fun to watch" and definitely have individual personalities that become apparent if you spend enough time with them.

Nearly lost to extinction in the 1980s, condors are integrally connected to the Yurok Tribe, which knowns the bird as prey-go-neesh, and others in the region, where the last reported sighting was near Drain, Oregon, in 1940.

(Read more about the Yurok Tribe's efforts in the Journal's May of 2019 story, "Bringing Prey-go-neesh Home" by clicking here.)

By this fall or next spring, after a release facility in Redwood National Park is completed, the first birds are expected to take flight, bringing California condors back to the northern reaches of its historic range, which once stretched to the Canadian border and east to Utah, Montana and Colorado.

Editor's Note: This story has been updated to correct that SF Gate wrote the piece.
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Monday, May 3, 2021

Ornament Call: Thousands of Handmade Decorations Needed for Local Trees Heading to D.C.

Posted By on Mon, May 3, 2021 at 11:24 AM

six_river_xmas_trees.png
A tree from the Six Rivers National Forest will serve as this year's U.S. Capitol Christmas tree and it's going to need a lot of ornaments  — some 4,000 large ones, in fact.

So, the call is on for California residents to help with the effort for the main tree, which will sit on the West Lawn, as well as 130 others being sent to light up the offices of Washington, D.C., officials, which will need an additional 11,000 ornaments along with tree skirts.

“The Six Rivers has the great responsibility of identifying and providing the Peoples Tree for the upcoming holiday season,” Ted McArthur, forest supervisor, said in a news release. “What better way to showcase the uniqueness and beauty of our great state than by decorating it with ornaments and tree skirts handmade by Californians.”

The theme for the decorations is "Six Rivers, Many Peoples, One Tree”  and those interested are encouraged "to help showcase the diverse peoples and ecology of California and its North Coast" and to use recycled, recyclable or naturals materials.

For details and how to participate, read the full release below:
EUREKA, Calif., May 3, 2021 — How do you decorate one 60- to 80-foot-tall Christmas tree plus 130 smaller companion trees? With lots and lots of ornaments and tree skirts! As part of the 51-year USDA Forest Service tradition, the Six Rivers National Forest is providing the 2021 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, which will grace the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol for the holiday season.

“The Six Rivers has the great responsibility of identifying and providing the Peoples Tree for the upcoming holiday season,” said Ted McArthur, forest supervisor. “What better way to showcase the uniqueness and beauty of our great state than by decorating it with ornaments and tree skirts handmade by Californians.”

The West Lawn tree will require nearly 4,000 large ornaments. Separately, the forest and nearby communities will provide an additional 130 smaller companion trees to light up offices of the California congressional delegation, as well as leadership at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the USDA Forest Service throughout Washington, D.C., for the 2021 holiday season.

These trees require approximately 11,000 smaller ornaments and 130 tree skirts.

With a newly selected theme of “Six Rivers, Many Peoples, One Tree,” all California residents are invited to help showcase the diverse peoples and ecology of California and its North Coast, as well as their creativity, by making ornaments and tree skirts for the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree and the smaller companion trees.

In addition to capturing California’s diversity, we encourage the use of recycled, recyclable, and natural materials as part of Woodsy Owl’s 50th birthday celebration highlighting its “Give a Hoot – Don’t Pollute” catchphrase. Ornament and tree skirt examples are available to view as a reference at www.uscapitolchristmastree.com.

Following are requirements for ornaments and tree skirts: Ornaments – U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree: 9 to 12 inches, colorful, reflective, and weatherproof to withstand the elements (wind, rain, and snow). 4,000 needed. Ornaments – 130 smaller companion trees: 4 to 6 inches, lightweight and colorful; however, durability is not a concern as they will be indoors. 11,000 needed.

Tree skirts: 5 feet in diameter. It may be possible for tree skirts to be returned; however, no guarantees can be made. 130 needed. U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree ornaments and tree skirts may not include logos, political, or religious affiliation or symbols, drug or alcohol references, be divisive or offensive. Ornaments cannot be returned.

Ornaments and tree skirts are due by September 1, 2021, and may be mailed to: U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, 1330 Bayshore Way, Eureka, CA 95501; or taken to drop-off sites listed at www.uscapitolchristmastree.com. For additional information about ornaments or tree skirts for the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree and how your group or community can get involved, contact Maritza Guzman at maritza.guzman@usda.gov or (707) 672-3184. ###
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Sunday, May 2, 2021

Countdown to the Redwood Sky Walk's Opening (with Slideshow)

Posted By on Sun, May 2, 2021 at 10:39 AM

A platform on the Redwood Sky Walk. - EDDY ALEXANDER ON BEHALF OF THE CITY OF EUREKA
  • Eddy Alexander on behalf of the city of Eureka
  • A platform on the Redwood Sky Walk.
The two-week countdown is on until the much-anticipated opening of the Redwood Sky Walk at the Sequoia Park Zoo.

Starting May 14, zoo visitors can access the 100-foot-high suspended pathways through the trees, which is the longest in the western United States, according to the zoo, at just under a fourth of a mile to the end and back.

“The Redwood Sky Walk is a tremendous new asset that will bring many benefits to our community,” city of Eureka Mayor Susan Seaman said in a news release. “Both locals and visitors alike will, undoubtedly, enjoy seeing our special park from this new perspective, and the Redwood Sky Walk’s new interpretive signage and programming will help more people than ever before to understand the delicate intricacies and dependencies of our local ecosystem.”
A grand opening event is planned for June 4.

With the May 14 launch comes a change in zoo admission prices, with differing amounts for Humboldt County residents and out-of-town visitors.

For adults (age 13 and older) the cost will be $14.95 and $24.95, children ages 3 to 12 at $10.95 and $11.95 and those age 2 and under are free. The admission cost includes access to the sky walk.

The zoo — which is not only the oldest operating in California and one of the nation’s smallest but one of the few that is still publicly owned — will be offering what the release describes as “special access programs” to “ensure the Sequoia Park Zoo will remain highly accessible to the entire community.”

“We are very excited to add this world-class attraction to our community,” Eureka City Manager Miles Slattery said. “The early feedback has been amazing and I’m especially thankful for the efforts and contributions of the project’s donors, city staff and contractors, the Sequoia Park Zoo Foundation, and the many zoo volunteers who all worked so hard and made this project possible.”
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Monday, April 26, 2021

Cold and Swift: Another Round of Trinity River Releases This Week

Posted By on Mon, Apr 26, 2021 at 10:34 AM

trinity_river_releases_graf.png
Another round of Trinity River restoration flows being released from the Lewiston Dam takes place this week to help improve conditions after another critically dry water year.

That means rising and swifter water at a time when the rivers are already running high and cold. Earlier this month, the Humboldt County Sheriff's Office and area residents rescued three swimmers who became stranded on a rock in the Trinity River at a day use area in Willow Creek.

"This year marks the third critically dry year in the last five years for the Trinity watershed," the Bureau of Reclamation release on the releases stated. "The planned release schedule attempts to maximize benefits to the physical and biological character of the Trinity River, given the constraints of the limited amount of water available.

A peak release to increase flows to 3,550 cfs is slated for April 28. Two others are scheduled in May.

A flow schedule based on the expected amount of water available to support salmon restoration efforts on the Trinity River is brought forward by the Trinity Management Council each year.

"Visitors near or on the river can expect river levels to increase during the flow releases and should take appropriate safety precautions," the release states. "Landowners are advised to clear personal items from the floodplain prior to the releases."

A daily schedule of flow releases is available at the program’s website www.trrp.net/restore/flows/current/.
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Tuesday, April 20, 2021

5 Things to Know About Federal Drought Aid in California

Posted By on Tue, Apr 20, 2021 at 6:44 AM

drought_monitor.jpeg
Stop if you’ve heard this before: California is in the grip of a severe drought. Again. 

Now the federal government is stepping in to help. 

To assist California, which is the nation’s largest food supplier, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently declared a drought disaster for 50 counties. That makes growers throughout the state who have been struggling with parched conditions eligible to seek federal loans.

“This declaration emphasizes the devastating and far-reaching impact of climate change on the agricultural producers that feed and power America,” Under Secretary of Agriculture Gloria Montaño Greene said in an emailed statement. 

Here’s what you need to know about the disaster declaration and its effect on California: 

There’s a big difference between a drought emergency and a USDA disaster

In March, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Thomas Vilsack wrote to California Gov. Gavin Newsom designating 50 California counties as “primary natural disaster areas” due to drought.

A drought disaster sounds alarming, but officials say the reality is more mundane: It simply opens up emergency federal loans to California farmers who are struggling with back-to-back dry years. Growers in the 50 counties but also in all the counties next door (including 16 in Oregon, Arizona and Nevada) are eligible for loans. 

“The bar is set very low to qualify, because the purpose of the disaster designation is to quickly make financial assistance available to (agricultural) producers,” said Jeanine Jones, interstate resources manager with the California Department of Water Resources. 

This federal designation is very different from declaring a drought emergency under California’s Emergency Services Act, which would allow the governor to take more sweeping actions affecting all Californians, such as mandating conservation, waiving some state regulations and reallocating funds. Under state law, declaring a drought emergency would require “conditions of disaster or of extreme peril to the safety of persons and property within the state” that local governments can’t cope with on their own. 

Comparing Vilsack’s designation of drought disaster areas to a state drought emergency is “like (comparing) apples to pineapples, because it’s a really large difference,” Jones said.

The decision was ‘as close to automatic as it can get’

So what is the federal decision based on? The USDA looks at how dehydrated California has been. 

Rain and snow in much of the state are roughly half of average. The state deemed the snowpack on California’s mountains “well below normal.” The two major reservoirs are at about half of their capacity. And streamflow rivals levels during the peak of the last drought, which started in 2012 and continued through 2016. 

“Much of the state has had two pretty darn dry years,” Jones said, adding that the most recent wet season — last October through March — ranks as the fourth driest on record in California.

A nationwide wetness watchdog, called the US Drought Monitor, has colored California in shades of yellow, orange, red and brown, which denote conditions ranging from abnormally dry to exceptional drought. 

The USDA’s designations hinge on that map. Counties can be considered drought disaster areas if any part enters the driest red and brown “extreme” and “exceptional” categories during the growing season, or if they move into the orange “severe drought” category and stay there for eight consecutive weeks. 

These categories are based on various measurements, not just precipitation and snowpack. They include vegetation health, soil moisture, surface water and other criteria. The map authors also work with local experts to gauge on-the-ground conditions. 

“The disaster declaration process is almost as close to automatic as it can get” because it’s based on the drought map, said Jacque Johnson, acting state executive director of the USDA Farm Service Agency’s state office. “What happened in California on March 5 was 50 of our 58 counties were disasters.” 

Farms in all counties are eligible for loans

Vilsack’s letter designated 50 California counties as primary disaster areas. The other eight are listed as “contiguous” counties. What gives?

Contiguous counties are exactly what they sound like: the counties that didn’t quite hit the drought threshold at the time but are adjacent to primary disaster areas. The eight counties are Orange, San Diego, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito. None of them, at the time of the declaration in March, had entered the more severe dry conditions of the other 50.

Growers throughout the state are eligible to apply for emergency federal loans until early November. Some also may qualify for other federal assistance programs. 

“The assumption is that collateral damage falls into the next door neighbor county,” Johnson said. “The county line is not a barrier.”

Legislators are pressuring Newsom to declare emergency

Newsom has so far resisted calls to declare a drought emergency. He said on Tuesday that his staff had been “talking for months internally” and drought plans were in place, but he was opaque when it came to providing specifics.

“We are prepared to move very quickly when we are prepared to move,” Newsom said.

Officials have said that they believe the state has enough administrative tools to respond to the drought without declaring an emergency.

The governor, under the threat of a recall, may be in triage mode, taking his pick of emergencies to respond to: drought, predictions of another monster wildfire season and the ever-present global pandemic.

Lawmakers have been quick to pounce on what they see as Newsom’s inattention or indifference to a pressing problem that hits rural communities hard. A bipartisan group of legislators, led by Senate Agriculture Committee Chair Andreas Borgeas, a Republican from Fresno, and Assembly Agriculture Committee Chair Robert Rivas, a Democrat from Hollister,  requested a statewide drought emergency declaration.

“From the Oregon border to the Mexican border, California farmers will see sharp cuts in water supplies this year.”

Jamie Johansson, president of the California Farm Bureau

The legislators noted that allocations from the State Water Project, which draws water from the San Francisco Bay-Delta and sends it to cities and farms, have been reduced to 5 percent of normal. They urged the governor to forestall a catastrophic loss in farm revenue.

In a reference sure to get under Newsom’s skin, the letter referred to actions taken by former Gov. Jerry Brown in 2014 when similar drought conditions prevailed. That emergency declaration, the letter said, provided “flexibility and commonsense streamlining to utilize our limited water in the most efficient way.”

At that time, Brown issued conservation mandates for all state agencies and told local water agencies to immediately implement their water shortage contingency plans, which restricted residential water use. The declaration also modified reservoir releases, accelerated funding for water projects ready to break ground and lifted requirements that water projects comply with California’s environmental quality law.

The loans can make or break farms and ranches

The State Water Resources Control Board in March put California’s 69,000 farms on notice that they should start planning now for severe impacts this summer.

This comes after climate change and inadequate water supply are already battering California’s growers, who produce more than 400 commodities, worth nearly $50 billion a year, including about half of the nation’s fruits and vegetables and nearly a fifth of its milk.

Legislators estimate that about 1 million acres of San Joaquin Valley farmland will be fallowed over the next two to three decades because of reduced groundwater and surface water supplies. They project the loss of 85,000 jobs as a direct result of reduced water access.  

Against that backdrop of dire news, the federal disaster declaration opens up aid for the state’s beleaguered growers and ranchers. The loans assist them for loss of crops, trees, land and livestock. 

Each farm operation could receive a loan of up to $500,000, based on its loss. The USDA’s emergency loans were budgeted at $1.21 billion nationwide for this year.

The federal agency “considers each emergency loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of production losses on the farm and the security and repayment ability of the operator,” Vilsack told Newsom in his letter.

Cows graze dry grass outside of Bieber, a small town in Lassen County, in July 2019. In response to increased drought risk, farmers and ranchers in all 58 California counties will become eligible for loans to assist with loss of crops, trees, land and livestock. Photo by Anne Wernikoff, CalMatters
Cattle graze outside of Bieber, a small town in Lassen County, in July 2019. In response to the drought, farmers and ranchers in all 58 California counties are eligible for loans to assist with loss of crops, trees, land and livestock. Photo by Anne Wernikoff, CalMatters

For farmers, the loans can make or break their operations, which are already on tight water allocation budgets.

“From the Oregon border to the Mexican border, California farmers will see sharp cuts in water supplies this year,” said Jamie Johansson, president of the California Farm Bureau. “That means hundreds of thousands of acres of land will lie idle. It means thousands of people will lose jobs, in both rural and urban areas. It means Californians will have less locally grown food available.”

The expenses can pile up. Because of the drought, ranchers may have to lease additional pasture, buy extra feed and pay to haul and store water to replace the natural water sources that have dried up, Johnson said.

The USDA has already received inquiries from California cattle ranchers interested in applying for the loans. 

The state has about 13,000 cattle operations, with more than 5 million cattle and calves. The San Joaquin Valley, particularly Tulare, Merced and Kings counties, has the most.

Katie Roberti, a spokeswoman for the California Cattlemen’s Association, said ranchers are facing the most severe conditions in decades, worse than the last drought. 

“While the federal designation is welcomed assistance, without precipitation many California cattle producers are going to be forced to make the difficult decision to reduce the size of their herds, some more drastically than others,” she said. “Feed on rangelands will be limited and we are hearing hay prices will be high. These herd reductions will have a lasting impact on the number of cattle in the West for years to come.”

This article first appeared on CalMatters Network and is republished here under a Creative Commons license.

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Thursday, April 15, 2021

Releases on the Trinity River to Significant Increase Flow This Week

Posted By on Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 12:50 PM

The Trinity River. - BUREAU OF RECLAMATION
  • Bureau of Reclamation
  • The Trinity River.

Restoration flows will begin tomorrow, April 16, on the Trinity River to help improve conditions after another critically dry water year.

A flow schedule based on the expected amount of water available to support salmon restoration efforts on the Trinity River is brought forward by the Trinity Management Council each year.

This week's two-day schedule is slated to increase daily average flows from 300 cubic feet per second to 1,300 cubic feet per second.

That means rising and swifter water at a time when the rivers are already running high and cold. Earlier this month, the Humboldt County Sheriff's Office and area residents rescued three swimmers who became stranded on a rock in the Trinity River at a day use area in Willow Creek.

"This year marks the third critically dry year in the last five years for the Trinity watershed," the Bureau of Reclamation release states. "The planned release schedule attempts to maximize benefits to the physical and biological character of the Trinity River, given the constraints of the limited amount of water available.

This week's release with be followed by other on April 21 and April 23 and a peak release to increase flows to 3,550 cfs on April 28. Two others are scheduled in May.

"Visitors near or on the river can expect river levels to increase during the flow releases and should take appropriate safety precautions," the release states. "Landowners are advised to clear personal items from the floodplain prior to the releases."

A daily schedule of flow releases is available at the program’s website www.trrp.net/restore/flows/current/.

Read the full release below:
WEAVERVILLE, Calif. – The Bureau of Reclamation announced today that this year’s restoration flow schedule for the Trinity River will begin on April 16. Each year, the Trinity Management Council advances a flow schedule based on the expected amount of water available to support salmon restoration efforts on the Trinity River.

Due to lack of precipitation and snowpack in the Trinity Mountains this winter, the flow schedule for 2021 is scaled to a critically dry water year. Critically dry is one of five water year types used by the Trinity River Restoration Program to decide how much reservoir water will be released in support of the program’s goals to improve habitat for anadromous fish—fish that migrate to fresh water from salt water to spawn—like salmon and steelhead. This year marks the third critically dry year in the last five years for the Trinity watershed. The planned release schedule attempts to maximize benefits to the physical and biological character of the Trinity River, given the constraints of the limited amount of water available.

Key components of the flow release schedule are:
  • April 16-17: Increase daily average flows from 300 cubic feet per second to 1,300 cfs
  • April 21: Decrease flows to 500 cfs
  • April 23: Increase flows to 1,500 cfs
  • April 28: Increase flows to peak release of 3,550 cfs
Thereafter, two additional flow increases to 1,950 cfs on May 6 and 1,600 cfs on May 28 are scheduled before flow decreases to summer baseflow (450 cfs) on June 18, which continues until September 30. Visitors near or on the river can expect river levels to increase during the flow releases and should take appropriate safety precautions. Landowners are advised to clear personal items from the floodplain prior to the releases.

A daily schedule of flow releases is available at the program’s website www.trrp.net/restore/flows/current/. The public may subscribe to automated notifications of Trinity River release changes (via phone or email) at https://www.trrp.net/restoration/flows/flow-release-notifications/. The Trinity Management Council is the governing body of the Trinity River Restoration Program. The council’s membership includes Hoopa Valley Tribe, Yurok Tribe, Trinity County, State of California, USDA-Forest Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Fisheries, and the Bureau of Reclamation.

For additional information, visit https://www.trrp.net/ or contact the office at 530-623-1800 (TTY 800-877-8339) info@trrp.net.
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Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Fish and Wildlife: Don't Take the Fawns (with Video)

Posted By on Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 12:50 PM

Don't take the fawns. - CDFW
  • CDFW
  • Don't take the fawns.
Fawn season is here and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife is reminding the public that mother deer after hide their young in tall grass or brush, at times for hours, while out foraging.

“It is a very common mistake to believe a fawn has been abandoned when it’s found alone, even if the mother has not been seen in the area for a long period of time,” CDFW’s environmental program manager Northern Region Joe Croteau said in a news release. “It’s actually a survival strategy for the doe to separate from her fawns so as not to attract predators to the whereabouts of her young.”

Late spring to early summer is the peak time for the fawns to be born and CDFW often fields calls during these months from people who have taken the young deer, thinking they were abandoned, the release states.

Many times, the fawn are euthanized because long-term placements in zoos or wildlife facilities are limited and they can’t be returned to the wild.

Feeding or keeping deer is illegal and anyone who removes a young animal from the wild is required to contact the CDFW or bring the animal to a licensed wildlife center within 48 hours, the release states.

"To report an injured, sick or suspected orphaned fawn, contact your local CDFW regional office directly," the release states.

Read the full CDFW release below:

Late spring and early summer is the peak time for California’s deer herds to give birth to fawns, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is issuing a reminder to well-intentioned people to not interact with the baby deer – even if they find one that appears to be abandoned.

Adult female deer often stash their fawns in tall grass or brush for many hours while they are out foraging for food.

“It is a very common mistake to believe a fawn has been abandoned when it’s found alone, even if the mother has not been seen in the area for a long period of time,” said Joe Croteau, environmental program manager with CDFW’s Northern Region. “It’s actually a survival strategy for the doe to separate from her fawns so as not to attract predators to the whereabouts of her young.”

Each year, CDFW and wildlife rehabilitation facilities are called to assist with fawns that have been removed from the wild by concerned members of the public recreating outdoors. With limited long-term placement options in zoos or other wildlife sanctuaries, the animals often have to be euthanized since they lack the survival skills to be released back into the wild and can become dangerous and difficult to keep as they become bigger.

To report an injured, sick or suspected orphaned fawn, contact your local CDFW regional office directly.

Anyone who removes a young animal from the wild is required to notify CDFW or take the animal to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator within 48 hours. Only a limited number of wildlife rehabilitation facilities are licensed to accept fawns.

It is both illegal to feed deer and keep deer in your personal possession. Both crimes are misdemeanors, each subject to penalties of up to $1,000 and/or six months in jail. Learn more about the dangers and consequences of feeding deer in this CDFW video.

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Thursday, April 8, 2021

Crabs to Play Ball for Limited Crowd with Locals on the Roster

Posted By on Thu, Apr 8, 2021 at 1:53 PM

The Humboldt Crabs have announced their return to the field June 4, with three local players on the roster.

Willamette University infielder Ethan Fischel, Bethel University utility man Aidan Morris and Umpqua Community College pitcher Caleb Ruiz, who all hail from Eureka, will among those taking to the field this summer.

As for how many spectators can take themselves out to the ballgame, there's no hard number yet. Crabs President David Sharp responded to an email from the Journal, saying  the stands will welcome "somewhere between 20-33 percent capacity, so somewhere in the range of 350-450 fans." For now, entry won't require proof of vaccination, though visitors will have to wear masks and practice social distancing.

Sharp says, "Seating will be arranged in 1-4 person pods, all socially distanced throughout the bleachers and outfield grass areas. Tickets must be purchased in advance through our website." Not ready to join the crowd? Don't sweat it. Sharp adds that the games will be live streamed so nobody misses a swing.

Crabs News: The 2021 roster will feature three Eureka-born players, Willamette University infielder Ethan Fischel,...

Posted by Humboldt Crabs Baseball on Thursday, April 8, 2021
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Friday, April 2, 2021

Three Rescued from Trinity River

Posted By on Fri, Apr 2, 2021 at 2:10 PM

Three Arcata residents drawn to the Trinity River by warm temperatures this week were rescued at the Big Rock Day Use area after they became trapped on a rock.

A Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office deputy responded around 4:45 p.m. Wednesday to a report of swimmers in distress and spotted the individuals on the rock in the water, according to a HCSO news release.

“The deputy retrieved his department-issued water rescue gear, and with the help of additional community members on scene, the deputy deployed the rescue equipment and brought all three of the subjects safely to shore,” the release states.

The sheriff’s office cautions those tempted to make their way back to local rivers as the mercury begins to rise that many are still running high, swift and cold, especially this early in spring.

The new release also offered these safety tips:
  • Be sure to check river levels and flow information with the National Weather Service, in addition to water release information for the Trinity River.
  • Never swim alone.
  • Avoid swimming into a fast-moving current.
  • If the current seems too strong, get out of the water.
  • Don’t consume alcohol while swimming.
  • Inflatable water toys should not be used in place of a life jacket.
  • Young children should wear a life jacket when swimming in the river.
  • Watch children at all times.
  • If you are not a strong swimmer, do not swim in the river. Instead, enjoy from the shore.

Read the full HCSO release below:
On March 31, 2021, at about 4:45 p.m., a Humboldt County Sheriff’s deputy assigned to the Trinity River Division was contacted regarding multiple swimmers in distress at the Big Rock river access in Willow Creek.

The deputy arrived on scene and observed three people stuck on a rock in the river. The deputy retrieved his department-issued water rescue gear, and with the help of additional community members on scene, the deputy deployed the rescue equipment and brought all three of the subjects safely to shore.

The deputy later learned the subjects were from the Arcata area and had decided to go for a swim in the river due to the nice weather.

The Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the community members who assisted our deputy in bringing the subjects to safety.

While the weather is getting warmer throughout Humboldt County, the Sheriff’s Office would like to remind the public that it is still too early to swim in some of our local rivers, including the Trinity River, due to high water levels and swift currents.

If you do decide to swim in the local rivers this summer, the Sheriff’s Office offers some safety tips:
  • Be sure to check river levels and flow information with the National Weather Service, in addition to water release information for the Trinity River.
  • Never swim alone.
  • Avoid swimming into a fast-moving current. If the current seems too strong, get out of the water.
  • Don’t consume alcohol while swimming.
  • Inflatable water toys should not be used in place of a life jacket.
  • Young children should wear a life jacket when swimming in the river. Watch children at all times.
  • If you are not a strong swimmer, do not swim in the river. Instead, enjoy from the shore.
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