Monday, June 10, 2019

Yurok Tribe Awarded UN Honor for Forest Management Practices

Posted By on Mon, Jun 10, 2019 at 4:21 PM

Yurok fisheries technician Nick Folkins records data on Coho salmon in a recently restored stretch of McGarvey Creek. The Yurok Tribe implements large-scale river restoration projects throughout the Klamath River Basin. - COURTESY OF THE YUROK TRIBE
  • Courtesy of the Yurok Tribe
  • Yurok fisheries technician Nick Folkins records data on Coho salmon in a recently restored stretch of McGarvey Creek. The Yurok Tribe implements large-scale river restoration projects throughout the Klamath River Basin.
The Yurok Tribe recently became the first indigenous community in the United States to be awarded the Equator Prize by the United Nations Development Programme, which honors “innovative nature-based solutions for tackling climate change, environment and poverty challenges.”

“We are honored to receive recognition for our traditional ecological knowledge and western science-based approach to managing the temperate rainforests in our region,” tribal Chair Joseph L. James said in a release about the June 5 announcement. “Our tribe is rebuilding biodiversity in our forests and restoring resilience within our community. This time-tested strategy for rehabilitating critical habitats can be duplicated all over the world to reduce the impact of climate change.”

Created by former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the United Nation Development Programme “works to eradicate poverty while protecting the planet” by helping countries “develop strong policies, skills, partnerships and institutions so they can sustain their progress,” according to the program’s webpage.

The Equator Prize, awarded since 2002, comes with a $10,000 award and the opportunity for each of this year’s 22 winners from around the world to send two representatives to attend a week-long summit in New York City during the 74th UN General Assembly. The honorees will also be recognized at a ceremony Sept. 24.

The Yurok Tribe was selected for reclaiming more than 60,000 acres of ancestral lands that were stolen in the 19th century and clear-cut over the ensuring decades. Those forests, according to the tribe, are now managed by Yurok citizens to “re-create the diverse ecological conditions that existed on these lands for millennia” and provide for “the production of traditional foods, medicines and basket materials, as well as carbon sequestration.”

Engrained in the Yurok Constitution's principles to "preserve and promote" the tribe's culture, language and religious beliefs — which includes the reintroduction of the California condor as well as restoring their land's natural resources — the tribe financed the purchase with its carbon-offset forest project, which was the first developed under California protocols for the state’s cap-and-trade system back in 2014.

“We are blending the knowledge of ancestors with contemporary science to fix our forests and improve ecosystem health within our homeland,” said James. “We are very grateful for the recognition of this essential endeavor. We have made tremendous sacrifices to reclaim our right to determine our own destiny and be a strong steward of our land.”

Read the full release from the Yurok Tribe:

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Win One for the Gipper

Posted By on Mon, Jun 10, 2019 at 3:08 PM

Youngsters finish rounding the bases after the Crabs' first home win of 2019 - MATT FILAR
  • Matt Filar
  • Youngsters finish rounding the bases after the Crabs' first home win of 2019
“Oh, what a beautiful morning! Oh, what a beautiful day! I’ve got a beautiful feeling, everything’s going my way.”

My Grandmother used to sing that every morning to wake up my brother and I. And I, not being a morning person, hate hate hated it. Nothing worse than being rousted by someone an hour and a half ahead of you in mood. But today the sun is out, I’m lightly sunburned for the first time this year, and I’m feeling like Curly McLain because yesterday the Crabs dug out their first home win of the season!

Some new exoskeletons have joined our consortium of crustaceans since we last saw them: Dom Souto, a catcher and infielder from UC Berkley; Evan Gibbons, Nick Tabura (pitchers) and Dawsen Bacho (catcher), all from Sacramento State; and Ubaldo Lopez, a Dartmouth infielder and 2019’s winner of Longest Migration, all donned Crabs uniforms for the first time this week.

It seems to have helped. The Crabs clawed off two victories in the hostile, near-boiling waters of Redding. The Seattle Studs, however, are a different beast and proved it again this weekend, winning two out of three games in the series for the second year running. (Side note: The Studs are one of the oldest collegiate semi-pro teams in the country and are named after the Cheney Lumber Company, who copyrighted the 2x4s commonly used in home building. They are not, as I assumed, named after an ungelded male horse.)

Friday’s game was one of those where it was close until it wasn’t. The Studs and Crabs each scored two runs in the second inning, with Ubaldo “Ivy League” Lopez mashing a two-run homer for the Crabs’ part. From there it was a pitching duel, with only the rare inning getting past the fourth batter. Until the seventh inning, that is. One early error and the Studs seized the opportunity and put five runs on the board and that was that: 7-2 Studs, and the Crabs drop to 2-4 on the season —a 33 percent win rate, roughly equivalent to a 16-33 season.

Saturday was one of the quickest games I’ve ever seen, clocking in just under two and a half hours. We were in the bottom of the fourth inning at 7:45 p.m., an average of 10 minutes per inning. That’s nuts.

In the top of the third with one out, a Stud reached first on a dropped third strike. For those unfamiliar: If you strike out, but the catcher drops the ball, you are allowed to bust ass to first base. If you make it there before the someone throws you out, you are safe. It’s incredibly rare and one of the stranger rules in baseball, but it happened Saturday night. The Stud stole second a few pitches later, and was ultimate brought home on a deep sacrifice fly: 1-0 Studs on zero hits.
Davonte Butler showing off the Crabs' camo uniforms. - MATT FILAR
  • Matt Filar
  • Davonte Butler showing off the Crabs' camo uniforms.
Davonte Butler was throwing darts in his second start, and by the seventh inning looked poised to pitch a no-hitter and lose, a rare feat. But he was spared, the seventh was his last appearance, relieved by Dalton Smith. The bad guys snuck another run in and while the Crabs would score one of their own in the ninth, a two out rally in the final inning is a tough draw for anytime. Final score: 2-1 Studs.

Before Sunday’s game, I was able to speak with Manager Robin Guiver about the Crabs uncharacteristically rough start.

“It’s been hard. We started the season missing about half our roster, playing really good teams, but we’re starting to fill out now. We’ve got, like, 10 hitters now instead of eight, so our pitchers don’t have to hit anymore. Guys can play more of their main positions. But no excuses, we have to play better. And we will.”

Days like Sunday are made for baseball. Sunny but not overly hot, minimal wind, no clouds but the chemtrails being dispersed overhead. The only better way to spend a Sunday like that than at a ballpark is working in a lab with Norman Borlaug on a wheat strain that will literally save billions of lives. And that already happened.

New Crab Evan Gibbons got his first start and threw five strong innings, allowing only one run and four hits. And, for the first time in the series, solid pitching had
Damian Henderson slides past an errant throw in Sunday's game. - MATT FILAR
  • Matt Filar
  • Damian Henderson slides past an errant throw in Sunday's game.
bats behind its back. The Studs scored one run early and the Crabs responded by driving in two of their own in the second. They would score one run in each of the next two innings and clamp down to ride a 4-1 lead all the way through the ticker tape. They won, they fucking won. The floodgates are open, Ladies and Germs.

Hecklers were in fine form all weekend, fine form indeed. One Studs player, the catcher, was sucking on what appeared to be a lollipop all weekend, and that proved to be an endless font for the first base line.

Heckle of the Series
goes to the erudite gentleman who organized and led the whole bleachers on a spirited rendition of “The Lollipop Song” (many thanks to The Chordates).

Cheers and Jeers
Cheers to yours truly for making Gordon, Crab Grass Band conducted and noted stoic, laugh with a heckle.

Jeers, in fact Double Jeers. to me for having such a precious ego I had to openly Cheers myself.

Cheers to the whole Crabs' fanbase, for being so polite and accommodating to those trying to exit and enter these new, confounding bleachers. Let’s all agree to be judicious and thoughtful in our risings and sittings, yeah? Minimize trips. If you’re going to buy a beer, get two. If you think you may get snacky, head over to the concession stand and procure some sustenance before buying your beers. Don’t be that guy who’s getting up every 10 minutes to buy one thing.

Naughty List
Two young bucks were cast from the left field viewing area for insisting upon using foul language. I get it, sprites, curse words are cool. But knowing your audience is way cooler. Stay in school.

Three boots, zero fatalities.
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UPDATE: Suspect Fled, HCSO Reports 'No Perceived Threat to the Community'

Posted By on Mon, Jun 10, 2019 at 11:16 AM

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UPDATE:

HCSO reports “deputies are clearing the scene” after finding no signs of the man inside the barn where he was believed to be barricaded but states there is “no perceived threat to the community at this time.”

“Due to the nature of the investigation, the fact that deputies were unable to obtain a positive identification for the male prior to him fleeing, and no response or signs of the subject inside the barn in which he was believed to be barricaded, law enforcement decided to change tactics and clear the scene,” a Facebook post states, adding that the investigation is continuing.


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Saturday, June 8, 2019

Humboldt School Kids Hit the Beach for a Cause (with Video)

Posted By on Sat, Jun 8, 2019 at 1:34 PM

Humboldt County school children make their mark on Kids Ocean Day. - J PATRICK CUDAHY VIA FRIENDS OF THE DUNES
  • J Patrick Cudahy via Friends of the Dunes
  • Humboldt County school children make their mark on Kids Ocean Day.
Humboldt County school children descended on the South Spit to remove invasive species and pick up trash in celebration of the statewide Kids Ocean Day that culminated Thursday with a group photo captured from the air.

This year’s design featured the 1,000 or so elementary school students creating a pair of Western grebes with a heart and the phrase, “Protect what you love” — a moment caught on camera by photographer J Patrick Cudahy as local pilot Mark Harris flew over the beach at the Mike Thompson Wildlife Area.

“Thanks to funding from the California Coastal Commission, students from San Diego to Humboldt County are able to get outside for a field trip to the beach while playing an active role in stewardship of our coastal environments,” says Suzie Fortner, Friends of the Dunes programs and operations director, in a release.

“When we visit classrooms before the event, the kids are so excited to learn about all the plants and animals that live along our coast,” she continues. “Healthy ecosystems depend on biodiversity and kids intrinsically understand that. They love the beach and the ocean, not to mention all the plants and animals that live in these environments.”

Read the full Friends of the Dunes release below:

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Friday, June 7, 2019

EPD Seeks Suspect in Possible Hate Crime

Posted By on Fri, Jun 7, 2019 at 2:05 PM

FILE
  • FILE
The Eureka Police Department is investigating an assault at Starbucks on Tuesday evening as a possible hate crime.

According to EPD spokesperson Brittany Powell, officers were dispatched to Starbucks at about 6:40 p.m. for a report of a fight between a man and two women. When they arrived, they found the suspect had fled the scene.

Letitia Gaillard, who is of mixed racial descent, says she was sitting at a table at the coffee shop with some friends when she stepped outside to smoke a cigarette, leaving her backpack and some other personal items on the table, knowing her good friend Aimee Upchurch would look after them. While Gaillard was outside, Upchurch says a man came to the table and asked if he could plug his phone into an electrical outlet there and she said it was fine.

Gaillard says that is when she returned inside she saw the man in her seat and politely asked him to move so she could sit back down. The man started mumbling, Upchurch said, calling Gaillard a “fat cow” and saying she “probably didn’t have a man but if she did he needed to come down there to suck his dick.”

Concerned, Upchurch says she started to get up and come around the the table when Gaillard, who hadn’t heard the man’s mutterings, again asked him for her seat back. At that point, Gaillard says the man stood up and said, “You’re nothing but a fucking nigger,” shoved her and then started to throw a punch. Upchurch then stepped between the two, taking the man’s punch on the left side of her jaw.

Gaillard, who says she comes from a military family and knows some self-defense, says she then began pushing the man back and keeping him off balance, at which point another Starbuck’s customer stepped in and separated them, keeping the man at a distance.

“I don’t know his name but I would really like to thank him,” Gaillard says. “He just said, ‘I’m sorry this happened to you guys and left.’”

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Remembering the Lost Crew of Coast Guard 6549

Posted By on Fri, Jun 7, 2019 at 1:12 PM

Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay crewmembers gather to honor and remember the crew of CG-6549. - USCG
  • USCG
  • Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay crewmembers gather to honor and remember the crew of CG-6549.
The Coast Guard held a ceremony today in memory of the four crew members of CG-6549 who lost their lives during a rescue mission off of Cape Mendocino in 1997.

Lt. Jeffrey F. Crane, 35, of Marshfield, Massachusetts; Lt. j.g. Charles W. Thigpen IV, 26, of Riverside; Petty Officer 3rd Class Richard L. Hughes, 33, of Black Canyon, Arizona; Petty Officer 3rd Class James G. Caines, 26, of Hinesville, Georgia, died 22 years ago on June 8 when the MH-65 Dolphin helicopter they were traveling in went down in heavy winds.
This photo shows the CG-6549 Memorial at Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay. The memorial honors the crew of CG-6549 who were lost on June 8, 1997 in an effort to rescue mariners in distress approximately 60 miles West of Cape Mendocino, California - USCG
  • USCG
  • This photo shows the CG-6549 Memorial at Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay. The memorial honors the crew of CG-6549 who were lost on June 8, 1997 in an effort to rescue mariners in distress approximately 60 miles West of Cape Mendocino, California
The crew was responding to Canadian vessel in distress in heavy seas and 45-knot winds. Another Coast Guard Air Station Humboldt Bay helicopter, a Coast Guard Air Station Sacramento HC-130 Hercules aircraft and the Coast Guard Cutter Edisto were also responding to the call when they lost track of CG-6549.

Scatter debris from the helicopter was found in the area and the main fuselage was recovered on the ocean floor over a month later, according to the Coast Guard.

All aboard the vessel were safely rescued.

“The crew of Coast Guard 6549 made the ultimate sacrifice in an attempt to save the lives of those in peril on the sea," said Cmdr. Brendan Hilleary, the Sector Humboldt Bay response chief. "Let us always remember these men that their sacrifice may stand as an inspiration to all of us who continue to stand the watch.”
The memorial to the crew of Coast Guard 6549. - USCG
  • USCG
  • The memorial to the crew of Coast Guard 6549.
Read the full Coast Guard release below:

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Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Humboldt Area Foundation Hires New Chief Executive Officer

Posted By on Wed, Jun 5, 2019 at 1:10 PM

SUBMITTED
  • Submitted

Humboldt Area Foundation hired Bryna Lipper as the foundation’s new Chief Executive Officer. Lipper is coming to Humboldt County with a master’s degree in Public Administration from Harvard University and a history in philanthropy: She was the acting director for the Office for International and Philanthropic Innovation at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and later co-founded the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities initiative, serving as the initiative’s senior vice president from 2013 to 2018.


“Lipper was the candidate most qualified to take Humboldt Area Foundation to the next level,” Board Chair Kathryn Lobato said in the release. “Her presentation to the board included very deep and strategic thinking about the Foundation and how we work. Her energy, enthusiasm and experience in managing complexity will be great assets to the Foundation.”


Lobato made the announcement today after a six-month hiring process with more than 90 applicants from across the country. Lipper was among six applicants who were invited to visit and interview with staff in Bayside and the Wild Rivers Community Foundation in Crescent City. Humboldt Area Foundation’s board of directors — who worked closely with staff, community members and local consultants during the hiring process — voted unanimously to hire Lipper.

Read the full press release below: 

Humboldt Area Foundation Selects Bryna Lipper as New Chief Executive Officer

BAYSIDE, CALIF. (June 5, 2019) – Humboldt Area Foundation board chair Kathryn Lobato announced today that the board has chosen Bryna Lipper as its new chief executive officer. The decision came after a six month hiring process which saw more than 90 candidates apply from across the country. Lipper was one of six candidates invited to visit and interview with staff in Bayside and at the Wild Rivers Community Foundation in Crescent City.

“Lipper was the candidate most qualified to take Humboldt Area Foundation to the next level,” said Lobato. “Her presentation to the board included very deep and strategic thinking about the Foundation and how we work. Her energy, enthusiasm and experience in managing complexity will be great assets to the Foundation.”

Lipper holds a master’s degree in Public Administration from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. Her previous experience in philanthropy includes co-founding the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities initiative and serving as the initiative’s senior vice president from 2013 to 2018. Prior to that Lipper served as acting director for the Office for International and Philanthropic Innovation at the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. Lipper has stated that she is looking for her “forever home” where she can make a long-term commitment and positive impact.

Humboldt Area Foundation’s board of directors worked closely with staff, community members and local consultants throughout the hiring process, eventually reaching a unanimous decision to hire Lipper. Lipper will be moving from the Boston area to Arcata next month and start at the Foundation August 1.

Patrick Cleary, who served as Executive Director of the Foundation for the past six and a half years, will stay on part-time as Director of Community Prosperity and Investments. This new role will involve overseeing investment portfolios and advising and managing complex gifts.

About Humboldt Area Foundation:
Vera Vietor established the Humboldt Area Foundation in 1972. Since then, more than $80 million in grants and scholarships have been awarded in Humboldt, Del Norte, Curry and Trinity Counties. Humboldt Area Foundation promotes and encourages generosity, leadership and inclusion to strengthen our communities.

For more information on services provided by the Foundation please visit the Humboldt Area Foundation website at hafoundation.org or call (707) 442-2993.
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North Coast Night Lights: Eureka Slough Railroad Bridge

Posted By on Wed, Jun 5, 2019 at 12:23 PM

DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
I remember when the rails in Humboldt County rumbled to the passage of great trains rolling regularly through the county. Looking back, I took far too little advantage of the photographic opportunities they afforded while their time and mine here overlapped. Now we have them in memory only, and photographing the remnants of their steel carriages and rusting rails evokes ghosts of a bygone day.

With thoughts of capturing some of that once mighty line’s remains in the stark light of the modern night I found myself on the old railroad bridge over the Eureka Slough at the north end of Eureka, Humboldt County, California. Here the Old meets New, as this section of the former track is slated to become part of the Humboldt Bay Trail, connecting Eureka with Arcata for non-motorized traffic
(https://humboldtgov.org/humboldtbaytrail).

In photography’s early days images were monochromatic, reproducing all the vibrant colors of a scene as a range of gray values from white to black. Film was an ideal medium for capturing history, and the early history it recorded lives on today as black and white images. For over a hundred years photography recorded a world without color for posterity.
A night on the old Railroad bridge over the Eureka Slough at the north end of Eureka, Humboldt County, California. Trains thundered down these tracks regularly back in the day. Photographed June 7, 2018. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • A night on the old Railroad bridge over the Eureka Slough at the north end of Eureka, Humboldt County, California. Trains thundered down these tracks regularly back in the day. Photographed June 7, 2018.

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Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Eureka Council Rejects Humboldt Made's Proposal, Moves Forward with Virginia Marketing Firm

Posted By on Tue, Jun 4, 2019 at 6:34 PM

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Meeting in closed session on the heels of recent revelations that staff had materially misrepresented the extent of issues with Humboldt Made’s proposal to provide marketing services for the city, the Eureka City Council voted this evening to direct the city manager to negotiate the $370,000 annual contract with the other finalist, Eddy Alexander, based in Virginia.

The closed session decision — which City Attorney Bob Black said was reached by general consensus — comes amid serious questions about the city’s request for proposals process that had led to staff’s recommendation to award the contract to Humboldt Made. On May 21, the city council went against that recommendation and instead voted to have both finalists interviewed by a new review panel appointed by the mayor that was to include at least one council member and marketing experts.

But that panel interview never took place as revelations about errors with Humboldt Made’s initial proposal — and how they were misrepresented to the public and the council — consumed the process. Black took on reviewing the issues and told the Journal he planned to report his findings to the council this evening, as well as applicable law, under a closed session agenda item listed as “significant exposure to litigation.”

"The legal standard that we're looking for is did it give one proposer a competitive advantage and, if so, the irregularity would not be considered a minor matter," Black told the Journal on Friday. "It would put it out of bounds for a waiver."

The city issued a request for proposals for the marketing contract back in February, severing decades-long ties with the Eureka-Humboldt Visitors Bureau, and set a proposal deadline of April 5. The RFP required interested firms to submit both print and digital copies of their proposals by the deadline, warning that submittals that weren't timely or complete "shall" be rejected.

Staff initially indicated that Humboldt Made submitted an incorrect draft of its print proposal and the correct draft of its digital proposal by the deadline, with the sole issue with the incorrect copy being a duplicate page that took the place of another page. Humboldt Made was allowed to resubmit the print proposal, staff said, on April 8, the next business day.

But after a Journal inquiry led to Black's review last week, the city's administrative staff found that Humboldt Made had not in fact submitted a correct digital copy of the proposal before the deadline and that corrections in the resubmitted print copies were far more extensive than staff had originally represented.

Because the contract in question is for more than $100,000 in city funds, the city's procurement policy states that the city council is the sole entity with the power to waive "irregularities" in the bid process. Tonight, the council voted not to waive the irregularities and thus to reject Humboldt Made's proposal. In a separate vote, the council then directed City Manager Greg Sparks to move forward with negotiating the contract with the other finalist, Eddy Alexander.

Both votes will come back before the council in open session on June 18 in the form of resolutions.
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Monday, June 3, 2019

UPDATE: Inmate Fight Breaks Out at Klamath-area Fire Camp

Posted By and on Mon, Jun 3, 2019 at 9:53 PM

alder-cc-new.png
UPDATE:
The California Department of Correction and Rehabilitation reports that the one staff member and three inmates treated for injuries sustained in last night’s riot at the Alder Creek Conservation Camp have been released from the hospital.

“The inmates who initiated the incident have been transported to Pelican Bay State Prison and placed in administrative segregation,” the CDCR release states. “The Office of the Inspector General was notified.”

According to CDCR, about 40 inmates were involved in the fight that broke out around 5 p.m. at the camp, which is jointly operated by Cal Fire and provides inmate firefighting crews. The cause of the riot remains under investigation.

“Multiple orders to stop fighting were given to the inmates by correctional staff,” the release states. “When they did not comply, staff used pepper spray and physical force to quell the incident.”

Several agencies, including the Del Norte Sheriff’s Office and the California Highway Patrol, responded the camp’s 911 call for assistance.

Read the full CDCR release at the end of the story.

PREVIOUS:

At approximately 5 p.m., a request went out over the scanner for reinforcements at Alder Conservation Camp as officers worked to quell a riot with was reported to be “40 to 50” inmates involved. This incident reportedly occurred near the baseball field, according to an officer speaking from the scene over the scanner.

Cal Fire Battalion Chief Paul Savona confirmed just before 9 p.m. that there had been a riot and said that no Cal Fire staff were injured but declined to comment further.

At least three ambulances were requested over the scanner, but it isn’t clear if they were all used but at least one was, according to medical personnel speaking over the radio.

One man who lives in the Klamath area reported on social media seeing a number of official vehicles, including 10 California Highway Patrol cars, four sheriff vehicles (Probably Del Norte County though he didn’t specify), three or four park rangers, at least two “fire units” and one ambulance responding to the camp.

The camp based near Klamath provides inmate firefighting crews for the Humboldt-Del Norte Ranger unit areas. They also are known for assisting the American Cancer Society with the Relay for Life events, building toys for the Toys for Tots program and creating wood products like desks, benches, etc.


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