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Friday, June 14, 2019

Canine Unit Sniffs Out 2 Pounds of Meth in Fortuna

Posted By on Fri, Jun 14, 2019 at 12:16 PM

FPD
  • FPD
A detective with the Fortuna Police Department uncovered 2 pounds of methamphetamine Wednesday during a routine traffic stop on Riverwalk Drive, according to a press release.

Detective Brian Taylor was on patrol when he watched a driver commit a traffic violation and pulled him over, at which time he “noticed the smell of marijuana coming from inside the vehicle,” the release states.

Since a Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office canine unit was already nearby, Taylor requested its assistance and the dog “immediately signaled that it sensed the presence of illegal narcotic,” according to the FPD.

During a search of the vehicle, “two packages were located in a duffle bag in the back seat area of the car which was determined to contain methamphetamine,” the release states.

The driver was interviewed and release while the passenger, 23-year-old Fortuna resident Miguel Carrillo Villalobos, was arrested on suspicion of transporting drugs for sale.

Read the full Fortuna Police Department release below:


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Wednesday, June 12, 2019

North Coast Night Lights: Night Lights in the Fog

Posted By on Wed, Jun 12, 2019 at 2:17 PM

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In which an expedition to photograph beneath the night skies encounters lemons in the form of a thick pea soup fog, so we make lemonade. We had hoped for a starry night and the Milky Way, but the lemonade turned out better than expected.

In online photo circles, one will bump into other photographers through the images they share, follow each other’s work and sometimes meet up to shoot together or collaborate. Mary Burns and I ran into each other through our images on Instagram and have followed each other’s work for a year or so. She does a lot of work with people, and I do a lot of work with night, so naturally our collaboration would involve photographing people at night beneath a starry sky.

Mary introduced me to her friend and fellow local photographer Gabriel Smith and her brother Liam before we caravanned to our destination.

We arrived to find a world socked in with a coastal fog dense enough to do proud the moors in The Hound of the Baskervilles. The mists thickened and thinned with the varying wind but never gave us a glimpse of the sky. It condensed on the trees and dripped from the leaves like rain from not far away; it dampened the stars from our sight and gave us a wet and gray night.
“You shall not pass!” We encountered The Fire Lord, who required a password. But we had too many passwords already and forgot it.  —Gabriel Smith models as the Fire Lord in this re-creation. Humboldt County, California. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • “You shall not pass!” We encountered The Fire Lord, who required a password. But we had too many passwords already and forgot it. —Gabriel Smith models as the Fire Lord in this re-creation. Humboldt County, California.
Thwarted in photographing scenic landscapes, we tripped down the mindscapes of our imagination. We had lights, sparklers, people, fog and cameras. The sparklers cast dramatic glows in the fog and swirling smoke and our lights threw stark shadows and brilliant shafts piercing through the mists and over the ground.

We played, bouncing light and ideas off of each other. Gabriel and I alternated turns modeling and photographing while Liam held a light on us from behind. Mary photographed and I kept the sparklers going for us. It felt strange being on other side of the camera. Striking a pose and holding the flaming sparkler aloft before me, I felt like the wizard Gandalf challenging the great Balrog of Morgoth.


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Another Record-Breaker on the Books Today

Posted By on Wed, Jun 12, 2019 at 10:40 AM

heat.jpg
Good morning, Humboldt.

According to the Eureka office of the National Weather Service, coastal communities have already seen another record-breaking day, with temperatures at Woodley Island hitting 71 degrees by 9 a.m.

Admittedly, the previous high for June 12 was a low bar at 68 degrees.


Meanwhile, per the usual, inland temps are even higher — another heat advisory is in effect from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. — and there is a chance that the afternoon could bring some isolated thunderstorms to the interior reaches of Humboldt, Del Norte and Trinity counties.

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Tuesday, June 11, 2019

UPDATE: Hot! Hot! Hot! Heat Advisory Until 7 p.m.

Posted By on Tue, Jun 11, 2019 at 3:09 PM

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SECOND UPDATE:

According to the Eureka office of the National Weather Service, coastal communities have another record-breaker in Wednesday, with temperatures at Woodley Island hitting 71 degrees by 9 a.m. Inland temps are even hotter.

Read more here.

UPDATE:

Eureka tied the highest temp for the month of June, hitting the 85 degree mark, but the record won’t be official until 5 p.m.

PREVIOUS:

A heat advisory issued by the National Weather Service in Eureka is in effect until 7 p.m. tonight, including coastal areas.

According to a tweet earlier today, temperatures at the Woodley Island office reached 83 degrees, just two degree shy of the record for the month of June, but easily surpassed the date’s high of 69 set back in 1963 by hitting 73 degrees by 9:30 a.m.

The Eureka office reported in a thread on the post. “Yesterday the high was 81, which ranks 4th (39th all-time). We'll see what today reaches!”

Cooler temperatures are expected to return later in the week.
Editor's note: This story was updated to reflect the correct high temp for June.
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Monday, June 10, 2019

Yurok Tribe Awarded UN Honor for Forest Management Practices

Posted By on Mon, Jun 10, 2019 at 4:21 PM

Yurok fisheries technician Nick Folkins records data on Coho salmon in a recently restored stretch of McGarvey Creek. The Yurok Tribe implements large-scale river restoration projects throughout the Klamath River Basin. - COURTESY OF THE YUROK TRIBE
  • Courtesy of the Yurok Tribe
  • Yurok fisheries technician Nick Folkins records data on Coho salmon in a recently restored stretch of McGarvey Creek. The Yurok Tribe implements large-scale river restoration projects throughout the Klamath River Basin.
The Yurok Tribe recently became the first indigenous community in the United States to be awarded the Equator Prize by the United Nations Development Programme, which honors “innovative nature-based solutions for tackling climate change, environment and poverty challenges.”

“We are honored to receive recognition for our traditional ecological knowledge and western science-based approach to managing the temperate rainforests in our region,” tribal Chair Joseph L. James said in a release about the June 5 announcement. “Our tribe is rebuilding biodiversity in our forests and restoring resilience within our community. This time-tested strategy for rehabilitating critical habitats can be duplicated all over the world to reduce the impact of climate change.”

Created by former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the United Nation Development Programme “works to eradicate poverty while protecting the planet” by helping countries “develop strong policies, skills, partnerships and institutions so they can sustain their progress,” according to the program’s webpage.

The Equator Prize, awarded since 2002, comes with a $10,000 award and the opportunity for each of this year’s 22 winners from around the world to send two representatives to attend a week-long summit in New York City during the 74th UN General Assembly. The honorees will also be recognized at a ceremony Sept. 24.

The Yurok Tribe was selected for reclaiming more than 60,000 acres of ancestral lands that were stolen in the 19th century and clear-cut over the ensuring decades. Those forests, according to the tribe, are now managed by Yurok citizens to “re-create the diverse ecological conditions that existed on these lands for millennia” and provide for “the production of traditional foods, medicines and basket materials, as well as carbon sequestration.”

Engrained in the Yurok Constitution's principles to "preserve and promote" the tribe's culture, language and religious beliefs — which includes the reintroduction of the California condor as well as restoring their land's natural resources — the tribe financed the purchase with its carbon-offset forest project, which was the first developed under California protocols for the state’s cap-and-trade system back in 2014.

“We are blending the knowledge of ancestors with contemporary science to fix our forests and improve ecosystem health within our homeland,” said James. “We are very grateful for the recognition of this essential endeavor. We have made tremendous sacrifices to reclaim our right to determine our own destiny and be a strong steward of our land.”

Read the full release from the Yurok Tribe:

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Win One for the Gipper

Posted By on Mon, Jun 10, 2019 at 3:08 PM

Youngsters finish rounding the bases after the Crabs' first home win of 2019 - MATT FILAR
  • Matt Filar
  • Youngsters finish rounding the bases after the Crabs' first home win of 2019
“Oh, what a beautiful morning! Oh, what a beautiful day! I’ve got a beautiful feeling, everything’s going my way.”

My Grandmother used to sing that every morning to wake up my brother and I. And I, not being a morning person, hate hate hated it. Nothing worse than being rousted by someone an hour and a half ahead of you in mood. But today the sun is out, I’m lightly sunburned for the first time this year, and I’m feeling like Curly McLain because yesterday the Crabs dug out their first home win of the season!

Some new exoskeletons have joined our consortium of crustaceans since we last saw them: Dom Souto, a catcher and infielder from UC Berkley; Evan Gibbons, Nick Tabura (pitchers) and Dawsen Bacho (catcher), all from Sacramento State; and Ubaldo Lopez, a Dartmouth infielder and 2019’s winner of Longest Migration, all donned Crabs uniforms for the first time this week.

It seems to have helped. The Crabs clawed off two victories in the hostile, near-boiling waters of Redding. The Seattle Studs, however, are a different beast and proved it again this weekend, winning two out of three games in the series for the second year running. (Side note: The Studs are one of the oldest collegiate semi-pro teams in the country and are named after the Cheney Lumber Company, who copyrighted the 2x4s commonly used in home building. They are not, as I assumed, named after an ungelded male horse.)

Friday’s game was one of those where it was close until it wasn’t. The Studs and Crabs each scored two runs in the second inning, with Ubaldo “Ivy League” Lopez mashing a two-run homer for the Crabs’ part. From there it was a pitching duel, with only the rare inning getting past the fourth batter. Until the seventh inning, that is. One early error and the Studs seized the opportunity and put five runs on the board and that was that: 7-2 Studs, and the Crabs drop to 2-4 on the season —a 33 percent win rate, roughly equivalent to a 16-33 season.

Saturday was one of the quickest games I’ve ever seen, clocking in just under two and a half hours. We were in the bottom of the fourth inning at 7:45 p.m., an average of 10 minutes per inning. That’s nuts.

In the top of the third with one out, a Stud reached first on a dropped third strike. For those unfamiliar: If you strike out, but the catcher drops the ball, you are allowed to bust ass to first base. If you make it there before the someone throws you out, you are safe. It’s incredibly rare and one of the stranger rules in baseball, but it happened Saturday night. The Stud stole second a few pitches later, and was ultimate brought home on a deep sacrifice fly: 1-0 Studs on zero hits.
Davonte Butler showing off the Crabs' camo uniforms. - MATT FILAR
  • Matt Filar
  • Davonte Butler showing off the Crabs' camo uniforms.
Davonte Butler was throwing darts in his second start, and by the seventh inning looked poised to pitch a no-hitter and lose, a rare feat. But he was spared, the seventh was his last appearance, relieved by Dalton Smith. The bad guys snuck another run in and while the Crabs would score one of their own in the ninth, a two out rally in the final inning is a tough draw for anytime. Final score: 2-1 Studs.

Before Sunday’s game, I was able to speak with Manager Robin Guiver about the Crabs uncharacteristically rough start.

“It’s been hard. We started the season missing about half our roster, playing really good teams, but we’re starting to fill out now. We’ve got, like, 10 hitters now instead of eight, so our pitchers don’t have to hit anymore. Guys can play more of their main positions. But no excuses, we have to play better. And we will.”

Days like Sunday are made for baseball. Sunny but not overly hot, minimal wind, no clouds but the chemtrails being dispersed overhead. The only better way to spend a Sunday like that than at a ballpark is working in a lab with Norman Borlaug on a wheat strain that will literally save billions of lives. And that already happened.

New Crab Evan Gibbons got his first start and threw five strong innings, allowing only one run and four hits. And, for the first time in the series, solid pitching had
Damian Henderson slides past an errant throw in Sunday's game. - MATT FILAR
  • Matt Filar
  • Damian Henderson slides past an errant throw in Sunday's game.
bats behind its back. The Studs scored one run early and the Crabs responded by driving in two of their own in the second. They would score one run in each of the next two innings and clamp down to ride a 4-1 lead all the way through the ticker tape. They won, they fucking won. The floodgates are open, Ladies and Germs.

Hecklers were in fine form all weekend, fine form indeed. One Studs player, the catcher, was sucking on what appeared to be a lollipop all weekend, and that proved to be an endless font for the first base line.

Heckle of the Series
goes to the erudite gentleman who organized and led the whole bleachers on a spirited rendition of “The Lollipop Song” (many thanks to The Chordates).

Cheers and Jeers
Cheers to yours truly for making Gordon, Crab Grass Band conducted and noted stoic, laugh with a heckle.

Jeers, in fact Double Jeers. to me for having such a precious ego I had to openly Cheers myself.

Cheers to the whole Crabs' fanbase, for being so polite and accommodating to those trying to exit and enter these new, confounding bleachers. Let’s all agree to be judicious and thoughtful in our risings and sittings, yeah? Minimize trips. If you’re going to buy a beer, get two. If you think you may get snacky, head over to the concession stand and procure some sustenance before buying your beers. Don’t be that guy who’s getting up every 10 minutes to buy one thing.

Naughty List
Two young bucks were cast from the left field viewing area for insisting upon using foul language. I get it, sprites, curse words are cool. But knowing your audience is way cooler. Stay in school.

Three boots, zero fatalities.
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Friday, June 7, 2019

Remembering the Lost Crew of Coast Guard 6549

Posted By on Fri, Jun 7, 2019 at 1:12 PM

Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay crewmembers gather to honor and remember the crew of CG-6549. - USCG
  • USCG
  • Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay crewmembers gather to honor and remember the crew of CG-6549.
The Coast Guard held a ceremony today in memory of the four crew members of CG-6549 who lost their lives during a rescue mission off of Cape Mendocino in 1997.

Lt. Jeffrey F. Crane, 35, of Marshfield, Massachusetts; Lt. j.g. Charles W. Thigpen IV, 26, of Riverside; Petty Officer 3rd Class Richard L. Hughes, 33, of Black Canyon, Arizona; Petty Officer 3rd Class James G. Caines, 26, of Hinesville, Georgia, died 22 years ago on June 8 when the MH-65 Dolphin helicopter they were traveling in went down in heavy winds.
This photo shows the CG-6549 Memorial at Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay. The memorial honors the crew of CG-6549 who were lost on June 8, 1997 in an effort to rescue mariners in distress approximately 60 miles West of Cape Mendocino, California - USCG
  • USCG
  • This photo shows the CG-6549 Memorial at Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay. The memorial honors the crew of CG-6549 who were lost on June 8, 1997 in an effort to rescue mariners in distress approximately 60 miles West of Cape Mendocino, California
The crew was responding to Canadian vessel in distress in heavy seas and 45-knot winds. Another Coast Guard Air Station Humboldt Bay helicopter, a Coast Guard Air Station Sacramento HC-130 Hercules aircraft and the Coast Guard Cutter Edisto were also responding to the call when they lost track of CG-6549.

Scatter debris from the helicopter was found in the area and the main fuselage was recovered on the ocean floor over a month later, according to the Coast Guard.

All aboard the vessel were safely rescued.

“The crew of Coast Guard 6549 made the ultimate sacrifice in an attempt to save the lives of those in peril on the sea," said Cmdr. Brendan Hilleary, the Sector Humboldt Bay response chief. "Let us always remember these men that their sacrifice may stand as an inspiration to all of us who continue to stand the watch.”
The memorial to the crew of Coast Guard 6549. - USCG
  • USCG
  • The memorial to the crew of Coast Guard 6549.
Read the full Coast Guard release below:

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Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Humboldt Area Foundation Hires New Chief Executive Officer

Posted By on Wed, Jun 5, 2019 at 1:10 PM

SUBMITTED
  • Submitted

Humboldt Area Foundation hired Bryna Lipper as the foundation’s new Chief Executive Officer. Lipper is coming to Humboldt County with a master’s degree in Public Administration from Harvard University and a history in philanthropy: She was the acting director for the Office for International and Philanthropic Innovation at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and later co-founded the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities initiative, serving as the initiative’s senior vice president from 2013 to 2018.


“Lipper was the candidate most qualified to take Humboldt Area Foundation to the next level,” Board Chair Kathryn Lobato said in the release. “Her presentation to the board included very deep and strategic thinking about the Foundation and how we work. Her energy, enthusiasm and experience in managing complexity will be great assets to the Foundation.”


Lobato made the announcement today after a six-month hiring process with more than 90 applicants from across the country. Lipper was among six applicants who were invited to visit and interview with staff in Bayside and the Wild Rivers Community Foundation in Crescent City. Humboldt Area Foundation’s board of directors — who worked closely with staff, community members and local consultants during the hiring process — voted unanimously to hire Lipper.

Read the full press release below: 

Humboldt Area Foundation Selects Bryna Lipper as New Chief Executive Officer

BAYSIDE, CALIF. (June 5, 2019) – Humboldt Area Foundation board chair Kathryn Lobato announced today that the board has chosen Bryna Lipper as its new chief executive officer. The decision came after a six month hiring process which saw more than 90 candidates apply from across the country. Lipper was one of six candidates invited to visit and interview with staff in Bayside and at the Wild Rivers Community Foundation in Crescent City.

“Lipper was the candidate most qualified to take Humboldt Area Foundation to the next level,” said Lobato. “Her presentation to the board included very deep and strategic thinking about the Foundation and how we work. Her energy, enthusiasm and experience in managing complexity will be great assets to the Foundation.”

Lipper holds a master’s degree in Public Administration from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. Her previous experience in philanthropy includes co-founding the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities initiative and serving as the initiative’s senior vice president from 2013 to 2018. Prior to that Lipper served as acting director for the Office for International and Philanthropic Innovation at the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. Lipper has stated that she is looking for her “forever home” where she can make a long-term commitment and positive impact.

Humboldt Area Foundation’s board of directors worked closely with staff, community members and local consultants throughout the hiring process, eventually reaching a unanimous decision to hire Lipper. Lipper will be moving from the Boston area to Arcata next month and start at the Foundation August 1.

Patrick Cleary, who served as Executive Director of the Foundation for the past six and a half years, will stay on part-time as Director of Community Prosperity and Investments. This new role will involve overseeing investment portfolios and advising and managing complex gifts.

About Humboldt Area Foundation:
Vera Vietor established the Humboldt Area Foundation in 1972. Since then, more than $80 million in grants and scholarships have been awarded in Humboldt, Del Norte, Curry and Trinity Counties. Humboldt Area Foundation promotes and encourages generosity, leadership and inclusion to strengthen our communities.

For more information on services provided by the Foundation please visit the Humboldt Area Foundation website at hafoundation.org or call (707) 442-2993.
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North Coast Night Lights: Eureka Slough Railroad Bridge

Posted By on Wed, Jun 5, 2019 at 12:23 PM

DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
I remember when the rails in Humboldt County rumbled to the passage of great trains rolling regularly through the county. Looking back, I took far too little advantage of the photographic opportunities they afforded while their time and mine here overlapped. Now we have them in memory only, and photographing the remnants of their steel carriages and rusting rails evokes ghosts of a bygone day.

With thoughts of capturing some of that once mighty line’s remains in the stark light of the modern night I found myself on the old railroad bridge over the Eureka Slough at the north end of Eureka, Humboldt County, California. Here the Old meets New, as this section of the former track is slated to become part of the Humboldt Bay Trail, connecting Eureka with Arcata for non-motorized traffic
(https://humboldtgov.org/humboldtbaytrail).

In photography’s early days images were monochromatic, reproducing all the vibrant colors of a scene as a range of gray values from white to black. Film was an ideal medium for capturing history, and the early history it recorded lives on today as black and white images. For over a hundred years photography recorded a world without color for posterity.
A night on the old Railroad bridge over the Eureka Slough at the north end of Eureka, Humboldt County, California. Trains thundered down these tracks regularly back in the day. Photographed June 7, 2018. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • A night on the old Railroad bridge over the Eureka Slough at the north end of Eureka, Humboldt County, California. Trains thundered down these tracks regularly back in the day. Photographed June 7, 2018.

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Wednesday, May 29, 2019

North Coast Night Lights: Memorial Day Flag

Posted By on Wed, May 29, 2019 at 11:39 AM

DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
There will be many words written and sentiments expressed in honor of Memorial Day, but none will be as significant as the thoughts and feelings, wishes and prayers we hold within ourselves. One’s heart is a special place, and when we had our moments of silence this weekend it was in order to bring to that special place those parts of the outside world that strike us to our core, to make them forever a part of ourselves and to better ourselves through them. When we better ourselves, it improves the world.

I was a college student at Humboldt State University in 1991 when the Gulf War broke out, our first war against Saddam Hussein. As always, times of war bring with them much on which to reflect. I thought about this as I watched our country’s people respond in so many varying ways. While I tend to do most of my reflecting on such things internally, the gamut of human expression is wide and other people will express themselves in any number of ways.

Some will raise their voices visually. Not long after the Gulf War started in 1991, a striking visual beacon was raised against the night sky along U.S. Highway 101 between Arcata and McKinleyville: a gigantic flag flying along the freeway, hoisted by crane and stretched taught by a cable anchored to a roller. Impressive by day, the giant flag’s illuminated Stars and Stripes stood out spectacularly against the backdrop of night. It drew my photographic eye like a moth to a flame. I wanted to photograph it. I had no thought of speaking any messages with a photograph, only of crafting something visually appealing.
A giant U.S. flag flies beside U.S. Highway 101 between Arcata and McKinleyville, Humboldt County, California. 1991. Shot on 35mm film, this is an in-camera double exposure on a single negative; I made one exposure of the whole scene with the crane carrying the flag twisting in the wind. Then, without advancing the film, I took a telephoto shot of the flag filling the frame with its stripes flowing softly upward. The two images overlapped on the negative to produce this image. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • A giant U.S. flag flies beside U.S. Highway 101 between Arcata and McKinleyville, Humboldt County, California. 1991. Shot on 35mm film, this is an in-camera double exposure on a single negative; I made one exposure of the whole scene with the crane carrying the flag twisting in the wind. Then, without advancing the film, I took a telephoto shot of the flag filling the frame with its stripes flowing softly upward. The two images overlapped on the negative to produce this image.


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