April 09, 2021 Slideshows

Godwit Days Birding Festival 

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Photo by Mark A. Larson
The long-billed curlew is a very appropriately named shorebird.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
A male (left) and female northern shoveler show off their outsized bill that is used to strain out food from the water.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
A flock of godwits and willets soar over one of the ponds.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
Nesting behavior begins in late March and April for Canada geese.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
Wood ducks appear in the oxidation ponds in April.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
The northern pintail is "considered by many to be the most elegant of all our ducks" (Burton and Anderson).
Photo by Mark A. Larson
A rare sighting for me of an immature black-crowned night heron.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
The hyperactive snowy egrets, whomove around looking for prey, have yellow feet and a black bill while the great egrets have black feet and a yellow bill.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
The adult Black-crowned night heron in breeding plumage.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
Great egrets stand and wait patiently for fish to swim by and then plunge after their meal.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
The power-line towers are frequently used as perches by raptors such as this red-tailed hawk.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
Keep your eyes open to see river otters swimming in the ponds at the Marsh in pursuit of their next meal.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
Northern harriers have a distinctive swooping, low-level flight pattern while hunting prey.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
Great egrets occasional go after prey on land; in this case, it had stalked and killed a vole.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
A pine siskin was feeding on teasel seeds.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
A House finch showed off its red head.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
A great blue heron made a successful catch of a fish on a very windy day.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
The hyperactive and shy marsh wren is very vocal with its song as it establishes nesting territory.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
This "little brown job (LBJ)," likely a song sparrow, has a beautiful call.
Photo by Mark A. Larson
A large murmuration of godwits and other shorebird species moved over the mud flats at low tide.
More slideshows
Thadeus Greenson, Mark McKenna12 images
Jennifer Fumiko Cahill12 images
Thadeus Greenson17 images
Kimberly Wear11 images
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Photo by Mark A. Larson
The long-billed curlew is a very appropriately named shorebird.

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