Community

Friday, February 17, 2017

Ready for Primetime

Posted By on Fri, Feb 17, 2017 at 10:59 AM

award_westminster_.png

Amid all the wagging cuteness and elegance on display at the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show last week, a local pup turned some heads.

More Than Ready, an Irish setter owned by Fortuna’s Tom and Anita Gage that came into the competition ranked 18th in the nation for owner handler dogs, took home a prestigious Award of Merit in the Irish setter best of breed competition. The award is a big win for the Gages and caught the notice of The New Yorker reporter Jia Tolentino. Anyone who took a class from Tom Gage, a retired Humboldt State Univeristy English professor, should recognize him in Tolentino’s depiction:
"Applause rang out; a breed competition had just concluded. A woman in a pink suit ran to greet her husband with brimming, joyful eyes. Her name was Anita Gage, and her Irish setter, Ready—official name: More Than Ready—had just won an Award of Merit. She and her husband, Tom, had travelled for fifteen hours to get to New York from California. Tom, an English professor, told me later, “The beauty of the Irish setter has caught the eye of painters for centuries.” Somehow, we got on the subject of Turkish politics, and for the rest of the dog show, as handlers napped in camping chairs and the animals lined up, Noah’s Ark style, to exit through the loading dock, the two of us talked about Fethullah Gülen."

Check out Tolentino’s full article here, and watch Anita Gage and Ready in action below. (Anita is the handler in pink wearing the No. 10 arm band.)


  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Food Sovereignty, Tribal Sovereignty

Posted By on Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Potawot Community Garden farm stand. - COURTESY OF POTAWOT COMMUNITY GARDEN, UIHS
  • Courtesy of Potawot Community Garden, UIHS
  • Potawot Community Garden farm stand.
When the Northern California Tribal Courts Coalition (NCTCC) was awarded a grant to improve tribal health last year, it didn’t hesitate in identifying food as the keystone. Spearheaded by Program Director Cynthia Boshell, NCTCC will roll out its first Tribal Youth Food Sovereignty Camps later this month. The all-day camps will consist of hands-on education, discussion and participation in growing and cooking native foods. In order to serve youth on the coast and inland, the camp will be repeated on consecutive days: Wednesday, Feb. 22 in Potawot; Thursday, Feb. 23 in Klamath and Friday, Feb. 24 in Orleans.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, February 13, 2017

Eureka Rallies Behind Planned Parenthood

Posted By on Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 1:37 PM

A crowd of more than 200 pro-choice and pro-Planned Parenthood supporters carry signs, chant and wave to passing drivers on Fifth Street outside the Humboldt County Courthouse on Saturday afternoon. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • A crowd of more than 200 pro-choice and pro-Planned Parenthood supporters carry signs, chant and wave to passing drivers on Fifth Street outside the Humboldt County Courthouse on Saturday afternoon.

The Humboldt County Courthouse lawn was filled Saturday with more than 200 people waving signs and chanting in a show of support for Planned Parenthood, which has come under threat with the new administration and Congress. Many passing motorists honked and waved in shows of support, though some offered a thumbs-down condemnation. Local photographer Mark Larson was there and shared the following slideshow.

Slideshow
Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally
Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally

Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally


By Mark Larson

Click to View 16 slides


  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Friday, February 10, 2017

Building a More Inclusive University

Posted By on Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 2:29 PM

FILE
  • File
Richard Boone walked back and fourth in front of a group of campus community members who gathered in Humboldt State University’s Goodwin Forum on Thursday. Behind Boone, the university’s dean of natural resources and sciences, was a large projection screen that read, “Campus wide discussions: Inequalities, justice and inclusion.”

Boone, who was recently appointed to his post in July of 2016, led the discussion on creating a more inclusive and safer campus community. All students, staff, faculty and administrators were invited to have a dialogue on how the school can be more inclusive to undocumented students, people of color and the LGBTQ community.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Customers Rally Behind El Pueblo Market Hit by Fire

Posted By on Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 5:14 PM

Customers took to Facebook to show support for the El Pueblo Market, which was destroyed in an early morning fire. The store was known for its authentic Mexican pastries. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Customers took to Facebook to show support for the El Pueblo Market, which was destroyed in an early morning fire. The store was known for its authentic Mexican pastries.
Traffic was snarled along Broadway in Eureka for several hours this morning as 30 firefighters battled a massive fire that destroyed the El Pueblo Market, which was known for its authentic Mexican pastries and other traditional foods.

No one was injured in the early morning blaze, which caused an estimated $750,000 in damage to the store. The cause of the fire is under investigation, according to a Humboldt Bay Fire release. Crews were still at the scene this afternoon working with the Humboldt County Arson Task Force to determine the fire's origin.

Several customers took to El Pueblo’s Facebook page to offer their sympathies and let the owners know they are behind the business that started in 1993.

‎ “I am sorry for your loss and Eureka's. I have wanted to stop and buy pan dulce. I will drop by when you rebuild,” Laura Eaton Zerzan Jones wrote on the El Pueblo Market page.

Another, by Heather Bergen, read: “So sad to learn what happened to your business. Hope you are back in business soon. Thank you for being a part of our community.”

The fire came on top of what was already a difficult start to the week for the business. According to the Eureka Police Department, officers responded to the store on Monday and Tuesday due to break-ins.

Read the Humboldt Bay Fire release below:

At approximately 5:30am on February 8th Humboldt Bay Fire was dispatched to a structure fire at 3600 Broadway Avenue with smoke coming from the building. The initial dispatch included two duty Chiefs, a squad, two engines and a truck. The first arriving unit reported heavy smoke visible from the door of a commercial market.

Units set up for fire attack and deployed multiple lines to attack the fire. A primary search was conducted to determine if any occupants were inside the building. The tiller ladder truck was set up to access the roof and coordinate venting the heat, smoke and gases from the interior. A second alarm was requested to move another HBF unit to the fire scene and an Arcata Fire Protection District engine into Eureka to assist in coverage. Fire conditions rapidly changed and it was apparent this was a well-established fire toward the rear of the building. Interior access was very difficult. A commercial second alarm was called for to bring in another engine and truck from mutual aid agencies.

Smoke conditions changed rapidly and indicated a deterioration of interior conditions, accompanied by fire ventilating through the roof away from ventilation crews. All units were removed from the interior of the building to attack the fire from the exterior in case of structural collapse and significantly high heat and no visibility.

Additional fire apparatus from Arcata and Fortuna responded to the scene to assist with water supply and attacking the fire. Samoa Fire units provided station coverage to maintain emergency response services to the Eureka area. The fire was controlled after approximately two hours with areas still actively burning due to collapsed structural members and debris. Crews are still on scene overhauling the fire and investigating the cause and origin working with the Humboldt County Arson Task Force. A total of 30 firefighters from four agencies operated on the fire scene, and several more provided station coverage.

Property damage is estimated at $750,000 as the building and contents are a total loss. Adjoining occupancies were not directly damaged by the fire but did require assistance in smoke removal.

No injuries to occupants or firefighters were reported.

Rapidly growing fires can occur in any structure at any time of day or night due to accidents, negligence or gross disregard for the safety of others. Working alarm and suppression systems including fire alarms and sprinkler systems are a great benefit to individuals, businesses and the community as they protect property, contents and assets. Please call 441-4000 to learn more!


  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sunday, February 5, 2017

California Doubles Down on Sanctuary Status, Arcata Mulls Next Move

Posted By and on Sun, Feb 5, 2017 at 10:07 AM

THINKSTOCK
  • Thinkstock

An executive order taking aim at sanctuary cities that President Donald Trump signed in his first days in office has cities, states and counties throughout the nation scrambling in all directions — some distancing themselves from the term “sanctuary” and others running toward it.

California is placing itself firmly in the latter category. Meanwhile, North Coast municipalities are taking a more cautious approach.

Trump’s orderlambasted as an executive overreach and unconstitutional by some — is already the target of a lawsuit filed by the city of San Francisco this week. The order threatens to withhold federal funding from cities, counties and states that hinder efforts to capture and deport undocumented immigrants, who it contends are a threat to public safety.

But the order stops short of offering an official definition of what a “sanctuary jurisdiction” is and ignores the fact that the vast bulk of federal funding that trickles down to local jurisdictions comes through congressional appropriations, not the executive branch.


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, February 3, 2017

A Troubled SoHum Road Finally Fails, Funding to Fix Uncertain

Posted By on Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 4:35 PM

Wilder Ridge Road, taken last year. - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • Wilder Ridge Road, taken last year.

Residents of the Wilder Ridge/Honeydew area, a remote region of Humboldt County on the Lost Coast, have taken to social media over the last few months to post post pictures of their failing roads, including the extremely rough ride through Humboldt Redwoods State Park, where bathtub-size potholes have bent frames and popped tires. That road is scheduled to be fixed in mid-summer, due to some accounting magic on the part of California State Parks, but Wilder Ridge Road, which connects Wilder Ridge with the nearest store, school and post office, faces greater uncertainty. A portion of the road that has been threatening to slide for several years, at Landergen Road just south of Honeydew, has been closed indefinitely.

"It is buckled all across and sunk about 16 inches and Landergen has a drop off about 3 feet right above it," said Teresa Davey, a Wilder Ridge resident who was called to pick up her young daughter from school before the road was closed entirely. The Journal interviewed Davey almost exactly a year ago, when we investigated the roughly $200 million in deferred maintenance the county has accrued for road repair. At that time, Davey said she would probably have to park a car on either side of the slip and hike with her daughter across the slide should it fall out.

Things have not improved since then, for the road or for Davey, who said she wishes the county had fixed the failing section of road when there was better weather.

"Now they were out here in the pouring down rain trying to figure out what to do," said Davey, who is working with the school's principal, who also lives on Wilder Ridge, to ferry kids across the slide so they can attend school. The only other alternate route for children attending Honeydew Elementary is via Garberville and U.S. Highway 101, 81 additional miles that would take an additional three to four hours to traverse.

But Tom Mattson, the director of Public Works, said funding has yet to come through to fix that or other rural roads. In previous interviews, Mattson has said there is not enough money reaching his department via gas tax to make needed infrastructure repairs. Measure U, a half-cent sales tax that would have earmarked money for road repair, was rejected by Humboldt County voters in November.

Reached by email this afternoon, Mattson said he has not yet received word if emergency funding from the state will be coming through to fix the Wilder Ridge slide. The county had applied for this funding in January after making a disaster declaration due to the impact of heavy winter rains.

"No funding has been made available yet, although some 30 California counties have declared emergencies. Until we know there is funding to fix it we cannot give an estimated timeline on when it will be fixed," said Mattson, adding that his department has made a request to the Bureau of Land Management to see if an access road owned by that agency can be made available.

A more recent photo of the slip on Wilder Ridge, where the road has been reduced to one lane. - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • A more recent photo of the slip on Wilder Ridge, where the road has been reduced to one lane.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

T-shirts, Get Your T-shirts!

Posted By on Fri, Feb 3, 2017 at 3:23 PM

tshirt_fb.gif

Did the Eureka Women’s March leave you feeling empowered? Want to hold onto that feeling and commemorate it? Want to support a local artist and a good cause at the same time? If so, you’re in luck.

In the wake of the march that organizers billed as the largest in Eureka’s history — with some estimating as many as 8,000 people in the streets Jan. 21 — Journal cartoonist Terry Torgerson penned a drawing of the Carson Mansion festooned with a pink “pussy ears” hat emanating rays of light. The cartoon has been so popular that we here at the Journal thought some might want one of their own. So we’ve reached out to a local T-shirt maker and mocked up the above design.

We’re going to be selling the shirts for $15 — a $6 markup from the cost of making them, some of which will go to Torgerson, as artists need all the help they can get these days, and the rest goes to the North Coast Rape Crisis Team, which offers comprehensive services — including prevention education, outreach and a 24-hour hotline (445-2881) — to victims of sexualized violence, because, you know, regardless of politics, that should be a cause and a service we can all stand behind.

If you’d like to get your hands on one of these shirts, it’s easy. Just call Sarah at 442-1400, extension 312, before Feb. 15 and she’ll take down your order, credit card number and contact info. Or, stop by the office (310 F St. in Eureka) and ask for Sarah. Then, we’ll let you know when the shirts are ready for pickup.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Arcata Introduces Online Crime Tracking

Posted By on Tue, Jan 31, 2017 at 4:04 PM

A screenshot of the Citizen RIMS program. - CITY OF ARCATA WEBSITE
  • City of Arcata website
  • A screenshot of the Citizen RIMS program.
Information on everything from missing person cases and recent police responses to crime stats for the city of Arcata are now available with the click of a mouse using a new mapping system that tracks incidents.

“Having an informed and involved community will help the Arcata Police Department be proactive in our attempt to reduce crime,” Arcata Police Chief Tom Chapman said in a release today announcing the Citizen RIMS program. “I am excited to launch this program to help the citizens of Arcata have a better understanding of what is occurring in their neighborhoods.”

As well as looking up calls for service and reported crimes, residents and others can also sign up for alerts, view arrest logs or check out a list of vehicles that have been reported stolen.

Read the full Arcata Police Department news release below:

Arcata Police Department introduces Citizen RIMS, an online crime reporting tool providing near-real time information on crimes and arrests in Arcata. The program allows you to track crime trends and keep up with enforcement efforts in your neighborhood.
The Citizen RIMS software is developed by Sun Ridge Systems and is integrated with APD’s computer aided dispatch system. Citizens are now able to see active calls for service happening right now, what’s happened in the past 24 hours, maps of incidents over a certain time period, maps of specific crime types, arrest logs for the past 30 days, recently stolen vehicle lists, missing persons lists, and most wanted lists.
Website visitors can also subscribe to a free email service and receive new incident and crime data on a daily or weekly basis. “Having an informed and involved community will help the Arcata Police Department be proactive in our attempt to reduce crime,” says Arcata Chief of Police Tom Chapman. “I am excited to launch this program to help the citizens of Arcata have a better understanding of what is occurring in their neighborhoods.”
Find out more about Citizen RIMS at www.cityofarcata.org/206/Police, or by calling the Arcata Police Department at 707-822-2428.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Monday, January 30, 2017

The Next Generation March on Wells Fargo: 'Divest' the DAPL

Posted By on Mon, Jan 30, 2017 at 10:50 AM

Four protesters brought a large white bucket filled with molasses, which mimicked the look of oil as they let it drip down their arms in protest of Wells Fargo. - SAM ARMANINO
  • Sam Armanino
  • Four protesters brought a large white bucket filled with molasses, which mimicked the look of oil as they let it drip down their arms in protest of Wells Fargo.
A group of seven young protesters gripped a long white banner reading, “Divest,” which stretched across G Street in Arcata. As the youth leaders marched north, they yelled, “Water is what?” “Water is life,” the fellow protesters responded.

The protesters marched from the Arcata Plaza to Wells Fargo on Saturday, led by Indigenous youth from the Karuk, Hoopa and Yurok tribes. After gathering, the group of more than 100 marched to the local branch of one of the largest banks financing the North Dakota Access Pipeline.

Hoopa Valley tribal member Nah-Tes Jackson was the first to speak to the crowd of 100 or so protesters on the Arcata Plaza on Saturday. - SAM ARMANINO
  • Sam Armanino
  • Hoopa Valley tribal member Nah-Tes Jackson was the first to speak to the crowd of 100 or so protesters on the Arcata Plaza on Saturday.
“We are all connected in the same journey,” Nah-Tes Jackson, a Hoopa tribal member, said after he shared his own experience of protesting in Standing Rock for four months. The protest and march came three days after President Donald Trump inked an executive order to rekindle the pipeline project, as well as the Keystone XL.

On the plaza prior to the march, three native youths stepped nervously in front of the crowd as it continued to expand. Kis-dyan-te’ Joseph, a 16 year old from the Hoopa Shoshone Piute and Karuk tribes, lead a Brush Dance song she discovered while protesting in Standing Rock.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Recent Comments

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2017 The North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation

humboldt