Food

Wednesday, September 8, 2021

California Can Keep Thirstiest Crops, State Ag Chief Tells ‘State of Mind’ Podcast

Posted By on Wed, Sep 8, 2021 at 11:57 AM

Almond trees begin to blossom in Shafter on Feb 16, 2021. Almonds come from the pits of drupes which is the fruit grown from almond trees. They are in the same classification as peach trees. - PHOTO BY SHAE HAMMOND FOR CAL MATTERS
  • Photo by Shae Hammond for Cal Matters
  • Almond trees begin to blossom in Shafter on Feb 16, 2021. Almonds come from the pits of drupes which is the fruit grown from almond trees. They are in the same classification as peach trees.
The head of California’s agriculture agency said on the California State of Mind podcast that even devastating drought doesn’t mean the state must uproot its thirstiest crops.

Instead says Karen Ross, head of state Department of Food and Agriculture, improvements in water usage among some of the state’s biggest water consumers will help solve the problem.

“Yes, we can continue to grow almonds and these other (water-intensive) crops,” Ross said on the podcast’s newest episode. “We need to do even more plant breeding to be able to increase the drought resiliency of the varietals we grow.”

When tomato growers switched to drip irrigation, they reduced water use by 40 percent while increasing productivity by 50 percent, Ross said. Industries like dairy have also reduced water use.

“We must do that,” Ross said. “These resources are precious. We have to make sure we’re using every drop as wisely as possible.”

Also up for discussion: Agricultural multinationals use 80 percent of California’s water for its crops, a number that has drawn attention to the state’s resource management amid a devastating drought.

Listen to the “California State of Mind” episode, co-hosted by Nigel Duara and guest co-host Randol White, on Apple podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Follow @yourgoldenstate, @CalMatters and @CapRadioNews on Twitter to engage with our show every week and see the top California news of the day.

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Monday, August 30, 2021

Schools Across Humboldt Serving Free Meals to Students, No Application Needed

Posted By on Mon, Aug 30, 2021 at 11:42 AM

Schools across Humboldt County are serving free breakfasts and lunches to students at no charge this year.

No applications are required to qualify for the meals, which are extentions of the Seamless Summer Feeding Option program. For more specific information, parents or guardians can contact individual campuses, according to a news release from the Humboldt County Office of Education.

Read the full release and find a list of participating schools and districts below:

The following school districts/school sites have amended their policy for serving meals to students under the extended Seamless Summer Feeding Option for the 2021-2022 school year. All students will be served lunch and/or breakfast at no charge at the following sites:

Alder Grove Charter School, Arcata School District, Big Lagoon Union School District, Blue Lake Union School District, Bridgeville School District, Coastal Grove Charter School, Cuddeback Union School District, Cutten School District, Eureka City Schools Unified District, Ferndale Unified School District, Fieldbrook School District, Fortuna Elementary School District, Fortuna Union High School District, Freshwater School District, Fuente Nueva Charter School, Garfield School District, Humboldt County Office of Education, Hydesville School District, Jacoby Creek School District, Klamath-Trinity Joint Unified School District, Loleta Union School District, Mattole Unified School District, McKinleyville Union School District, Northern Humboldt Union High School District, Northern United Humboldt Charter, Orick School District, Pacific Union School District, Pacific View Charter School, Peninsula Union School District, Rio Dell School District, Scotia Union School District, South Bay Union School District, Southern Humboldt Unified School District, Trinidad Union School District, and Union Street Charter School.

Effective July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022, children are eligible for free meals at no charge.

Households are not required to submit an Application for the above mentioned school sites.

For additional information, please contact the school district where your student attends.

Nondiscrimination Statement

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html External link opens in new window or tab., and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3) email: program.intake@usda.gov.

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Wednesday, July 21, 2021

The Megadrought is Just One Factor Driving Up the Price of Your Bread

Posted By on Wed, Jul 21, 2021 at 8:53 AM

A perfect storm of trouble—extreme dry conditions, a volatile commodity market, and climbing expenses—have millers and bakers passing on rising costs to customers.

Last spring, pandemic-related supply chain issues led to too little flour on supermarket shelves, just as cooped-up consumers turned to home baking for comfort. The problem was never a shortage of flour or wheat. Rather, the challenge involved a slow pivot to retail packaging, transportation and logistics delays, grocery store labor shortages, and panicked pandemic buying.

This year, there’s new trouble. Historic drought conditions have already destroyed or damaged crops in the West, Northern Plains, and Southwest, key U.S. growing regions for certain types of wheat. According to a July 6 report from the USDA, approximately 98 percent of the country’s spring wheat production is in an area experiencing drought conditions. 

Thanks to carryover inventory from 2020, there’s still plenty of wheat to go around. But the drought is just one of many factors playing havoc with the prices mills pay for wheat: Rising costs across supply chains, as well as volatile commodity grain markets exacerbated by drought conditions elsewhere in the world, are making flour more costly to produce. You may not see more expensive flour at the supermarket (though it’s possible). But you’ll likely pay more for loaves, pastries, and sweets at your favorite bakery. 



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Tuesday, June 8, 2021

Will California Public Schools Continue Free Lunches for All?

Posted By on Tue, Jun 8, 2021 at 5:17 PM

Food Service Manager Nakheu Saephanh hands out boxes of food to family members at La Escuelita in Oakland on June 7. Oakland Unified has been providing boxes for pickup or delivery — seven days worth of breakfast, lunch and snack — to all OUSD students since Spring of 2020. - ANNE WERNIKOFF/CALMATTERS
  • Anne Wernikoff/CalMatters
  • Food Service Manager Nakheu Saephanh hands out boxes of food to family members at La Escuelita in Oakland on June 7. Oakland Unified has been providing boxes for pickup or delivery — seven days worth of breakfast, lunch and snack — to all OUSD students since Spring of 2020.

Early in the pandemic, the only source of milk for some struggling families was from school lunches, recalls Stacy Johnson, director of nutrition services at Glendora Unified School District.

Even for families who weren’t as strained financially — or for families of picky eaters — getting meals during lockdown was something to get excited about: A chance to get out of the house, and to see teachers and friends.

And while the days of empty grocery store shelves and lockdowns have passed, for many, the benefit of meals at schools continues.  

At Sellers Elementary in Glendora, east of Los Angeles, that was evident by the busy meal service last Friday. At pickup time, parents walked younger students home carrying bags filled with food, enough to last through the weekend, while older students jammed the bags into their backpacks.

“My kids eat at school here during the year at the cafeteria when it’s open just because they love the experience of seeing other kids and going through the line,” Julie, a parent of students who asked to be identified only by her first name, said Monday.

Before the pandemic, in January 2020, the district served more than 35,000 lunches to students. In April 2021, with the return of in-person classes, 50,822 lunches were picked up. The district, where about 29% of the 7,200 students were eligible for free and reduced meals last year, continues to serve take-home lunches to students as it wraps up its school year. 

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Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Restaurants Need Workers. Would an Employee Vaccine Mandate Bring Them Back?

Posted By on Wed, May 12, 2021 at 7:51 AM

As they struggle to rehire, owners are navigating whether to require, encourage or reward staff COVID vaccinations.

Before implementing a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for employees at his 15 Chicago restaurants, Fifty/50 Restaurant Group co-founder Scott Weiner did his due diligence. He consulted a lawyer, discussed the idea with his staff, and developed a policy around the requirement. 

“I’ve been hearing for nine months across the industry and within my company that service industry employees don’t feel safe. One thing I can do at this point to make all employees and guests feel safe is require the vaccine,” Weiner said.

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Tuesday, April 20, 2021

'People and Planet Before Profit:' Post-Capitalism Conference Set to Kick Off

Posted By on Tue, Apr 20, 2021 at 2:00 PM

Can you imagine a world after capitalism? David Cobb can, and he wants you to join him.

“We need a system that puts people and planet before profit,” Cobb says in a recent phone interview with the Journal.

The good news, Cobb says, is that the core elements of the solidarity economy he and others believe will bring about a more equitable and just world don’t need to be imagined — they can be looked at, felt, experienced and replicated. And that’s one of the core messages of the Post-Capitalism Conference, a four-day virtual forum that begins Thursday and is hosted by Cooperation Humboldt, the nonprofit Cobb cofounded, and sponsored by Humboldt State University’s Native American Studies, Politics, Sociology and Environmental Studies departments, HSU’s California Faculty Association and the Environmental Justice/Climate Justice hub at University of California at Santa Barbara.

Cobb said the four-day event will focus on tangible solutions to pervasive problems, with discussions on universal basic income, worker-owned cooperative companies, community land trusts, public banking and food sovereignty designed to showcase work that’s currently being done to bring about a more equitable world.

“This is actually happening,” he said. “There’s a new economic system that’s being created right now but we don’t actually see it because it’s not being talked about.”

The conference is designed to meet people where they are, Cobb said, offering more detailed panel discussions — like Thursday’s “Regenerative Economic Development to Re-Indigenize” — for those already steeped in the concepts of decolonization and land trusts, alongside ones offering more broad-strokes introductions to larger concepts — like Thursday’s “From Where We Are to Where We Want to Be: How Do We Get There.” The idea, Cobb said, is to bring together a group of knowledgeable academics, theorists and practitioners to provide insight and information that will help guide people on their own paths to understanding the underlying ideas and putting them into practice.

The COVID-19 pandemic’s impacts on the conference are also profound, Cobb said. First, he said the virtual nature of the conference will allow people across the nation and world to participate free of charge, but it’s also allowed organizers to tap leaders at the forefront of various movements to participate from around the country. That means the conference will feature names like famed Marxian economist and author Rick Wolff, public banking pioneer Trinity Tran and Emily Kawano, the co-director of the Wellspring Cooperative Corporation in Massachusetts and coordinator of the U.S. Solidarity Economy Network.

“We have some really famous players — and also some people who frankly should be more famous,” Cobb said, pointing to Ramon Torres, who led the formation of Familias Unidas por Justicia, an indigenous farmworker labor union in Washington, and later founded a worker-owned cooperative berry farm.

But Cobb said the pandemic has also laid the nation’s gross economic disparities bare, leaving families struggling for food and housing, while the billionaire class has grown markedly richer. This, Cobb said, has increased the critical eye on the nation’s economic systems and how to change them.

“A decade ago, things like universal basic income and public banking weren’t — or didn’t seem — possible,” he said. “We now have an opportunity to dream big and think about systemic, transformational change.”

The conference will also put a spotlight on some issues of keen local interest — the food sovereignty movement, cannabis equity programs and the interconnectedness between white supremacy and capitalism. Cobb said he’s proud of the lineup that organizers have put together, noting it is “intentionally and deliberately multi-racial, multi-ethnic and multi-cultural,” with more female than male speakers.

Get the full schedule of events, presenter biographies and all the details on how to participate here. And check out the press release from HSU below

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Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Cooperation Humboldt Plants Fruit Trees for Everyone

Posted By on Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 1:50 PM

Eva Hogue, a Cooperation Humboldt garden installer, planting a fruit tree. - COOPERATION HUMBOLDT
  • Cooperation Humboldt
  • Eva Hogue, a Cooperation Humboldt garden installer, planting a fruit tree.
Cooperation Humboldt's mission to make food more available to all is steadily growing, with the local nonprofit planting an additional 130 fruit trees throughout the county this year.

“We believe that nutritious food is a fundamental human right, and our projects aim to put that belief into practice in very tangible ways,” said Tamara McFarland, who coordinates the Cooperation Humboldt's food program. “Growing public food in common spaces is an important step toward our goal to return Humboldt County to the regenerative, life-sustaining food forest and ecological haven that it once was.”

This year marks the third round of fruit tree planting. In 2019, 23 trees were planted and 56 trees last year, totaling around 209 public fruit trees. Once the trees begin fruiting, neighbors will be able to visit the tree and harvest.

Cooperation Humboldt's mission is to create a more equitable economy and empower people to learn skills that were once necessary for basic survival, like gardening and harvesting.

“Cooperation Humboldt's community fruit tree program has helped Two Feathers NAFS move toward Food Sovereignty, which we believe is an inherent right of Native Peoples — to self-determine food systems that rebalance healthy communities and Mother Earth," said Amy Mathieson, a family support coordinator and member of the Food Sovereignty Team at Two Feathers Native American Family Services (NAFS). "Over 40 youth joined us in both Hoopa and McKinleyville to plant 20 trees. They were able to learn how they can be active participants in Food Sovereignty, but just as importantly they were able to connect with nature, their community, Two Feathers staff, and each other. These connections are vitally important to the mental health and wellness of our youth and families.”

Through their food programs, Cooperation Humboldt has provided Little Free (Blue) Pantries to facilitate neighborhood food sharing, converted unused front lawns into gardens, empowered inexperienced gardeners to learn to grow food through free mini gardens, published the annual Community Food Guide and offered a variety of educational opportunities relating to food production.

To learn more about Cooperation Humboldt and their work, visit their website at www.cooperationhumboldt.org.

Read the full press release below.
LOCAL GROUP PLANTS FRUIT TREES FOR THE FUTURE

EUREKA, CA (March 31, 2021) –Local nonprofit social change organization Cooperation Humboldt has kicked off 2021 by planting over 130 fruit trees throughout Humboldt County. The trees were planted in publicly accessible locations with the specific intent of making food available to anyone who wants it. Everyone who received a tree has agreed to share its fruits with their neighbors once the trees begin to produce, and signage will be added to that effect.

“We believe that nutritious food is a fundamental human right, and our projects aim to put that belief into practice in very tangible ways,” says Tamara McFarland, who coordinates the organization’s food program. “Growing public food in common spaces is an important step toward our goal to return Humboldt County to the regenerative, life-sustaining food forest and ecological haven that it once was.”

“This opportunity means much more than just planting fruit trees for me. It is so valuable to connect with people by growing something together to empower our community,” reports Saimie Koontz, a garden installer for Cooperation Humboldt. “Working towards food sovereignty during a pandemic gives me hope for a stronger, kinder Humboldt.”

Amy Mathieson, Family Support Coordinator and Member of the Food Sovereignty Team at Two Feathers Native American Family Services (NAFS) shares, “Cooperation Humboldt's community fruit tree program has helped Two Feathers NAFS move towards Food Sovereignty which we believe is an inherent right of Native Peoples - to self-determine food systems that rebalance healthy communities and Mother Earth. Over 40 youth joined us in both Hoopa and McKinleyville to plant 20 trees. They were able to learn how they can be active participants in Food Sovereignty, but just as importantly they were able to connect with nature, their community, Two Feathers staff, and each other. These connections are vitally important to the mental health and wellness of our youth and families.”

This year’s undertaking builds on the success of the organization’s first two rounds of planting, which resulted in 23 trees planted in 2019 and 56 trees in 2020. A map of all locations can be viewed at https://tinyurl.com/coop-humb-fruit-trees. The significant growth of the program this year was due to Cooperation Humboldt’s participation in the 2020 Disaster Recovery COVID National Dislocated Worker Grant (NDWG). The grant provides disaster-relief and humanitarian assistance employment to dislocated workers to minimize the employment and economic impact of the COVID Pandemic, and is administered through the Smart Workforce Center at The Job Market.

Cooperation Humboldt’s food team also provides Little Free Pantries to facilitate neighborhood sharing, converts unused front lawns into productive gardens, empowers inexperienced gardeners to learn to grow food through their free mini gardens, publishes the annual Community Food Guide, and offers a variety of educational opportunities relating to food production. Learn more at cooperationhumboldt.org.

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Friday, March 26, 2021

A Sanctuary Garden

Posted By on Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:26 AM

Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden. - CENTRO DEL PUEBLO
  • Centro del Pueblo
  • Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden.
Tomorrow at 1:30 p.m., Centro del Pueblo and Cooperation Humboldt will be holding a ceremony to consecrate the Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden (11th and F streets) as a sanctuary for all people. 

The ceremony will feature music, food for those experiencing food insecurity, a land acknowledgement and the "ceremonial planting of seeds important to the Mixtec people."

Centro del Pueblo has created a gardening program called "Comida del Pueblo" which aims to empower the county's Latinx community to learn and share their gardening knowledge and reconnect with their Indigenous roots. 

Both Cooperation Humboldt and CDP have recently taken stewardship of the community garden and are now "caring for the wonderful native plants, fruit trees, herbs, and perennials that Open Door Community Health Centers planted during the years that they tended the garden."

Read the full Cooperation Humboldt press release below.

EUREKA, CA (Mar. 23, 2021) – On Saturday, March 27 at 1:30 p.m. Centro del Pueblo and Cooperation Humboldt will consecrate the Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden on the corner of 11th and F Streets as a Sanctuary for all people. There will be music, food for people experiencing food insecurity, a land acknowledgement, and the ceremonial planting of seeds important to the Mixtec people. Masks and physical distancing are required.

Cooperation Humboldt and Centro del Pueblo recently began stewardship of the Community Garden. They are now caring for the wonderful native plants, fruit trees, herbs, and perennials that Open Door Community Health Centers planted during the years that they tended the garden. They strive to create a space of learning, empowerment, nutrition, and regeneration. The garden is located on unceded ancestral Wiyot territory, on property owned and generously leased to Open Door at an affordable rate by the Arcata Presbyterian Church. Pastor Dan Link is a strong advocate for care and compassion for everyone in our community.

According to Cooperation Humboldt Food Team Anchor Tamara McFarland, “Cooperation Humboldt believes that access to nutritious and culturally appropriate food is a human right. We work to create a world where no one will ever go hungry due to lack of wealth or income. Growing public food in common space is an important step toward our goal to return Humboldt County to the regenerative, life-sustaining food forest and ecological haven that it once was.”

Cooperation Humboldt seeks to empower residents with the material, resources, skills and knowledge they need to grow more of their own food. They create structures for resource sharing, cultivate strong partnerships with others working for food sovereignty. They strive to shift community consciousness around food, from seeing it as a commodity to treating it as a fundamental human right.

In early Spring 2020, as the pandemic struck, Cooperation Humboldt realized the need to shift their efforts quickly to get food resources to those who needed them the most. This led to the launch of their Mini Gardens project, and within six months they delivered and installed 260 complete small garden setups to low-income residents. This project teaches participants to grow more of their own food and to share their new skills with friends and family. This year, their goal is to deliver and install at least 520 more mini gardens.

Anyone can donate nonperishable food or personal care items to Cooperation Humboldt’s network of 25 Little Free Pantries in Arcata and Eureka, and anyone can take what they need, 24 hours a day. Their impact has gone far beyond charity by strengthening relationships among neighbors, challenging assumptions about who gives and who takes, and exploring what it means to be in community with one another. This year, they plan to Install at least 10 more Pantries.

For the past three winters, Cooperation Humboldt has planted free fruit trees in public locations in partnership with community members and organizations willing to make the fruit available to anyone who wants some. This spring, they have already planted more than 100 public fruit trees.

For more information contact:
Tobin McKee - Cooperation Humboldt Program Administrator
(707) 407-7300
tobin.mckee@cooperationhumboldt.com
Tamara McFarland - Cooperation Humboldt Food Team Anchor
(707) 599-2951
tamara.mcfarland@cooperationhumboldt.com
Karina Coronado - Centro del Puelo
(707) 683-5293
kcoronado2015@gmail.com
Brenda Perez - Centro del Pueblo
(707) 683-5293
brenda.p.m@gmail.com
Pastor Dan Link - Arcata Presbyterian Church
360-969-6564
dannilink@gmail.com
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Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Food for People Begins Construction on the 14th Street Site

Posted By on Wed, Mar 3, 2021 at 12:54 PM

ffp-tzr.jpg
Food for People has announced that construction on its 14th Street facility, which was the epicenter of a sewer disaster that destroyed the building and everything inside last year, is set to begin in the coming weeks.

Right before the COVID-19 pandemic began impacting everyone's lives on Feb. 28, 2020, a city sewer drain pipe burst at FFP's 14th street facility that closed down the facility as "hopes, dreams, money, paperwork, food, trash cans, and so much more floated out the front door of Food for People, the Food Bank for Humboldt County, on a river of city sewer water."

But using leased office spaces and warehouses FFP was able to stay in business and help the many people who were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic through mobile food drives, networks of food pantries and other services.

The new building will include new additions like more warehouse space, expand job training, expand cold storage for more food, increase space and resources for disaster and emergency response and open the doors for a large among others.

"The California Center for Rural Policy’s most recent Food Access Report found that Humboldt County experiences the third-highest rate of food insecurity of California’s 58 counties," the release states, "Food for People already serves 10 percent of our County’s population, distributing 2 million pounds of food annually – but this represents only half of the people in our county experiencing poverty, an issue that has been further strained by the pandemic and accompanying economic downturn."

Food for People’s goal is to open their facility for full use next fall with the help of meeting their fundraising goal of $5 million but "thanks to the generous support of lead donors and our community they have already received $4 million towards the project" and only have $1 million to go.

Find out more at RebuildFoodforPeople.org or by contacting Food for People’s Development Director Carly Robbins at (707)445-3166 ext. 306 or crobbins@foodforpeople.org.

Read the full press release below.
Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

Food for People is Rebuilding - One Year after the Sewer Disaster
Carly Robbins, Development Director

Can you believe it’s been one year since the sewer disaster at Food for People? Are you scratching your head wondering how you never heard the story?

On February 28, 2020, hopes, dreams, money, paperwork, food, trash cans, and so much more floated out the front door of Food for People, the Food Bank for Humboldt County, on a river of city sewer water. It was a blow to their operations, especially as COVID-19 found its way to our community, stressing our local economy and food system. But worry not, Food for People rebounded quickly with the use of several leased spaces and has been working fast to distribute emergency foods to people seeking assistance across Humboldt County, including those newly impacted by the pandemic.

Now, one year later their Eureka Food Pantry continues to serve food at the temporary location at 2112 Broadway, and the rest of their operations that serve the whole Humboldt County area including the Network of 17 food pantries, Mobile Produce Pantry, Backpacks for Kids and other child nutrition programs, Senior & Homebound services, and CalFresh application assistance, are currently operating out of several leased warehouse and office spaces. Services have adapted and increased to meet the need in our community as many people struggle financially to deal with the hardships 2020 presented. But, it is only a temporary solution to a bigger issue. In order to meet the needs of the community now and into the future, Food for People needs a permanent home to address the severe food insecurity experienced by many locally. Hunger is a prevalent issue in our region. The California Center for Rural Policy’s most recent Food Access Report found that Humboldt County experiences the third-highest rate of food insecurity of California’s 58 counties. Food for People already serves 10% of our County’s population, distributing 2 million pounds of food annually – but this represents only half of the people in our county experiencing poverty, an issue that has been further strained by the pandemic and accompanying economic downturn.

But things are looking up! Back at 14th street, the water has been drained, and Food for People is on a new journey. The damaged building has been entirely demolished and construction of a new and improved facility is set to start in the next few months.

The new building will allow for exciting additions to Food for People’s services:

  • Additional warehouse space will enable Food for People to better support and enhance their countywide hunger relief services.
  • Make it possible for them to expand services and build space for partners to help connect people with a wider array of community support services that promote long-term stability and lead to a better quality of life.
  • Expand Job Training to improve employment prospects for people experiencing adversity by providing essential work skills.
  • Improve the quality of food provided by significantly expanding cold storage to prioritize healthy foods, safely accept and store more donated perishable foods and reduce food waste.
  • Increase space and resources for Disaster and Emergency Response to serve everyone impacted by the pandemic, wild fires, or any other natural disasters that might occur – which has never been more important.
  • Open the doors for a large, on site Choice Pantry to provide people with enough space to choose healthy foods with greater dignity to meet their personal dietary and cultural needs.

Food for People’s goal is to open their new doors for full use next fall. To make this possible, they are working to raise $5 million. Thanks to the generous support of lead donors and our community they have already received $4 million towards the project.

You can support this effort! Let’s put the dark days of 2020 behind us and look to a brighter future. Find out more at RebuildFoodforPeople.org or by contacting Food for People’s Development Director Carly Robbins at (707)445-3166 ext. 306 or crobbins@foodforpeople.org.

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Sunday, February 21, 2021

'Comida del Pueblo'

Posted By on Sun, Feb 21, 2021 at 6:25 AM

Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden. - CENTRO DEL PUEBLO
  • Centro del Pueblo
  • Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden.
Centro del Pueblo is launching a new gardening program this spring that would empower Humboldt County’s Latinx community to learn and share their gardening knowledge says Karina Coronado, a Centro del Pueblo volunteer who is spearheading the program.

“Comida del Pueblo” will provide herbs and vegetables for micro-gardening, spaces in community gardens for full gardening and offer skill-share classes outdoors, following social distancing guidelines.

Centro del Pueblo began planting seeds for starters that they will give to participants and is currently reaching out to other organizations to collaborate with for more gardening opportunities.

“I think this is a very special opportunity that I get to be a part of,” Coronado says. “There’s so much knowledge to share especially during a pandemic.”

Adan Cervantes Perez, who is also spearheading the effort, would like the program to be an opportunity for families to share intergenerational knowledge and experiences with their children.
CENTRO DEL PUEBLO
  • Centro del Pueblo


“I’m from Puebla, Mexico, I’ve been here in the U.S., California for 20 years and I’ve noticed that a few kids have lost a lot of their heritage, that they only know a few things from their culture, the rice, beans, corn but not how it’s cultivated and made,” Perez says in Spanish. “From the bottom of my heart, through the program, I would just like to share the knowledge that I learned from my hometown here so that we don’t lose those customs.”

The program would make access to food easier for the Latinx community but the most important goal of “Comida del Pueblo” is to establish a knowledge-sharing network of food and medicine cultivators to teach families about the importance of food.

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