Food

Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Cooperation Humboldt Plants Fruit Trees for Everyone

Posted By on Wed, Mar 31, 2021 at 1:50 PM

Eva Hogue, a Cooperation Humboldt garden installer, planting a fruit tree. - COOPERATION HUMBOLDT
  • Cooperation Humboldt
  • Eva Hogue, a Cooperation Humboldt garden installer, planting a fruit tree.
Cooperation Humboldt's mission to make food more available to all is steadily growing, with the local nonprofit planting an additional 130 fruit trees throughout the county this year.

“We believe that nutritious food is a fundamental human right, and our projects aim to put that belief into practice in very tangible ways,” said Tamara McFarland, who coordinates the Cooperation Humboldt's food program. “Growing public food in common spaces is an important step toward our goal to return Humboldt County to the regenerative, life-sustaining food forest and ecological haven that it once was.”

This year marks the third round of fruit tree planting. In 2019, 23 trees were planted and 56 trees last year, totaling around 209 public fruit trees. Once the trees begin fruiting, neighbors will be able to visit the tree and harvest.

Cooperation Humboldt's mission is to create a more equitable economy and empower people to learn skills that were once necessary for basic survival, like gardening and harvesting.

“Cooperation Humboldt's community fruit tree program has helped Two Feathers NAFS move toward Food Sovereignty, which we believe is an inherent right of Native Peoples — to self-determine food systems that rebalance healthy communities and Mother Earth," said Amy Mathieson, a family support coordinator and member of the Food Sovereignty Team at Two Feathers Native American Family Services (NAFS). "Over 40 youth joined us in both Hoopa and McKinleyville to plant 20 trees. They were able to learn how they can be active participants in Food Sovereignty, but just as importantly they were able to connect with nature, their community, Two Feathers staff, and each other. These connections are vitally important to the mental health and wellness of our youth and families.”

Through their food programs, Cooperation Humboldt has provided Little Free (Blue) Pantries to facilitate neighborhood food sharing, converted unused front lawns into gardens, empowered inexperienced gardeners to learn to grow food through free mini gardens, published the annual Community Food Guide and offered a variety of educational opportunities relating to food production.

To learn more about Cooperation Humboldt and their work, visit their website at www.cooperationhumboldt.org.

Read the full press release below.
LOCAL GROUP PLANTS FRUIT TREES FOR THE FUTURE

EUREKA, CA (March 31, 2021) –Local nonprofit social change organization Cooperation Humboldt has kicked off 2021 by planting over 130 fruit trees throughout Humboldt County. The trees were planted in publicly accessible locations with the specific intent of making food available to anyone who wants it. Everyone who received a tree has agreed to share its fruits with their neighbors once the trees begin to produce, and signage will be added to that effect.

“We believe that nutritious food is a fundamental human right, and our projects aim to put that belief into practice in very tangible ways,” says Tamara McFarland, who coordinates the organization’s food program. “Growing public food in common spaces is an important step toward our goal to return Humboldt County to the regenerative, life-sustaining food forest and ecological haven that it once was.”

“This opportunity means much more than just planting fruit trees for me. It is so valuable to connect with people by growing something together to empower our community,” reports Saimie Koontz, a garden installer for Cooperation Humboldt. “Working towards food sovereignty during a pandemic gives me hope for a stronger, kinder Humboldt.”

Amy Mathieson, Family Support Coordinator and Member of the Food Sovereignty Team at Two Feathers Native American Family Services (NAFS) shares, “Cooperation Humboldt's community fruit tree program has helped Two Feathers NAFS move towards Food Sovereignty which we believe is an inherent right of Native Peoples - to self-determine food systems that rebalance healthy communities and Mother Earth. Over 40 youth joined us in both Hoopa and McKinleyville to plant 20 trees. They were able to learn how they can be active participants in Food Sovereignty, but just as importantly they were able to connect with nature, their community, Two Feathers staff, and each other. These connections are vitally important to the mental health and wellness of our youth and families.”

This year’s undertaking builds on the success of the organization’s first two rounds of planting, which resulted in 23 trees planted in 2019 and 56 trees in 2020. A map of all locations can be viewed at https://tinyurl.com/coop-humb-fruit-trees. The significant growth of the program this year was due to Cooperation Humboldt’s participation in the 2020 Disaster Recovery COVID National Dislocated Worker Grant (NDWG). The grant provides disaster-relief and humanitarian assistance employment to dislocated workers to minimize the employment and economic impact of the COVID Pandemic, and is administered through the Smart Workforce Center at The Job Market.

Cooperation Humboldt’s food team also provides Little Free Pantries to facilitate neighborhood sharing, converts unused front lawns into productive gardens, empowers inexperienced gardeners to learn to grow food through their free mini gardens, publishes the annual Community Food Guide, and offers a variety of educational opportunities relating to food production. Learn more at cooperationhumboldt.org.

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Friday, March 26, 2021

A Sanctuary Garden

Posted By on Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 11:26 AM

Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden. - CENTRO DEL PUEBLO
  • Centro del Pueblo
  • Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden.
Tomorrow at 1:30 p.m., Centro del Pueblo and Cooperation Humboldt will be holding a ceremony to consecrate the Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden (11th and F streets) as a sanctuary for all people. 

The ceremony will feature music, food for those experiencing food insecurity, a land acknowledgement and the "ceremonial planting of seeds important to the Mixtec people."

Centro del Pueblo has created a gardening program called "Comida del Pueblo" which aims to empower the county's Latinx community to learn and share their gardening knowledge and reconnect with their Indigenous roots. 

Both Cooperation Humboldt and CDP have recently taken stewardship of the community garden and are now "caring for the wonderful native plants, fruit trees, herbs, and perennials that Open Door Community Health Centers planted during the years that they tended the garden."

Read the full Cooperation Humboldt press release below.

EUREKA, CA (Mar. 23, 2021) – On Saturday, March 27 at 1:30 p.m. Centro del Pueblo and Cooperation Humboldt will consecrate the Arcata Community Health and Wellness Garden on the corner of 11th and F Streets as a Sanctuary for all people. There will be music, food for people experiencing food insecurity, a land acknowledgement, and the ceremonial planting of seeds important to the Mixtec people. Masks and physical distancing are required.

Cooperation Humboldt and Centro del Pueblo recently began stewardship of the Community Garden. They are now caring for the wonderful native plants, fruit trees, herbs, and perennials that Open Door Community Health Centers planted during the years that they tended the garden. They strive to create a space of learning, empowerment, nutrition, and regeneration. The garden is located on unceded ancestral Wiyot territory, on property owned and generously leased to Open Door at an affordable rate by the Arcata Presbyterian Church. Pastor Dan Link is a strong advocate for care and compassion for everyone in our community.

According to Cooperation Humboldt Food Team Anchor Tamara McFarland, “Cooperation Humboldt believes that access to nutritious and culturally appropriate food is a human right. We work to create a world where no one will ever go hungry due to lack of wealth or income. Growing public food in common space is an important step toward our goal to return Humboldt County to the regenerative, life-sustaining food forest and ecological haven that it once was.”

Cooperation Humboldt seeks to empower residents with the material, resources, skills and knowledge they need to grow more of their own food. They create structures for resource sharing, cultivate strong partnerships with others working for food sovereignty. They strive to shift community consciousness around food, from seeing it as a commodity to treating it as a fundamental human right.

In early Spring 2020, as the pandemic struck, Cooperation Humboldt realized the need to shift their efforts quickly to get food resources to those who needed them the most. This led to the launch of their Mini Gardens project, and within six months they delivered and installed 260 complete small garden setups to low-income residents. This project teaches participants to grow more of their own food and to share their new skills with friends and family. This year, their goal is to deliver and install at least 520 more mini gardens.

Anyone can donate nonperishable food or personal care items to Cooperation Humboldt’s network of 25 Little Free Pantries in Arcata and Eureka, and anyone can take what they need, 24 hours a day. Their impact has gone far beyond charity by strengthening relationships among neighbors, challenging assumptions about who gives and who takes, and exploring what it means to be in community with one another. This year, they plan to Install at least 10 more Pantries.

For the past three winters, Cooperation Humboldt has planted free fruit trees in public locations in partnership with community members and organizations willing to make the fruit available to anyone who wants some. This spring, they have already planted more than 100 public fruit trees.

For more information contact:
Tobin McKee - Cooperation Humboldt Program Administrator
(707) 407-7300
tobin.mckee@cooperationhumboldt.com
Tamara McFarland - Cooperation Humboldt Food Team Anchor
(707) 599-2951
tamara.mcfarland@cooperationhumboldt.com
Karina Coronado - Centro del Puelo
(707) 683-5293
kcoronado2015@gmail.com
Brenda Perez - Centro del Pueblo
(707) 683-5293
brenda.p.m@gmail.com
Pastor Dan Link - Arcata Presbyterian Church
360-969-6564
dannilink@gmail.com
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Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Food for People Begins Construction on the 14th Street Site

Posted By on Wed, Mar 3, 2021 at 12:54 PM

ffp-tzr.jpg
Food for People has announced that construction on its 14th Street facility, which was the epicenter of a sewer disaster that destroyed the building and everything inside last year, is set to begin in the coming weeks.

Right before the COVID-19 pandemic began impacting everyone's lives on Feb. 28, 2020, a city sewer drain pipe burst at FFP's 14th street facility that closed down the facility as "hopes, dreams, money, paperwork, food, trash cans, and so much more floated out the front door of Food for People, the Food Bank for Humboldt County, on a river of city sewer water."

But using leased office spaces and warehouses FFP was able to stay in business and help the many people who were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic through mobile food drives, networks of food pantries and other services.

The new building will include new additions like more warehouse space, expand job training, expand cold storage for more food, increase space and resources for disaster and emergency response and open the doors for a large among others.

"The California Center for Rural Policy’s most recent Food Access Report found that Humboldt County experiences the third-highest rate of food insecurity of California’s 58 counties," the release states, "Food for People already serves 10 percent of our County’s population, distributing 2 million pounds of food annually – but this represents only half of the people in our county experiencing poverty, an issue that has been further strained by the pandemic and accompanying economic downturn."

Food for People’s goal is to open their facility for full use next fall with the help of meeting their fundraising goal of $5 million but "thanks to the generous support of lead donors and our community they have already received $4 million towards the project" and only have $1 million to go.

Find out more at RebuildFoodforPeople.org or by contacting Food for People’s Development Director Carly Robbins at (707)445-3166 ext. 306 or crobbins@foodforpeople.org.

Read the full press release below.
Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

Food for People is Rebuilding - One Year after the Sewer Disaster
Carly Robbins, Development Director

Can you believe it’s been one year since the sewer disaster at Food for People? Are you scratching your head wondering how you never heard the story?

On February 28, 2020, hopes, dreams, money, paperwork, food, trash cans, and so much more floated out the front door of Food for People, the Food Bank for Humboldt County, on a river of city sewer water. It was a blow to their operations, especially as COVID-19 found its way to our community, stressing our local economy and food system. But worry not, Food for People rebounded quickly with the use of several leased spaces and has been working fast to distribute emergency foods to people seeking assistance across Humboldt County, including those newly impacted by the pandemic.

Now, one year later their Eureka Food Pantry continues to serve food at the temporary location at 2112 Broadway, and the rest of their operations that serve the whole Humboldt County area including the Network of 17 food pantries, Mobile Produce Pantry, Backpacks for Kids and other child nutrition programs, Senior & Homebound services, and CalFresh application assistance, are currently operating out of several leased warehouse and office spaces. Services have adapted and increased to meet the need in our community as many people struggle financially to deal with the hardships 2020 presented. But, it is only a temporary solution to a bigger issue. In order to meet the needs of the community now and into the future, Food for People needs a permanent home to address the severe food insecurity experienced by many locally. Hunger is a prevalent issue in our region. The California Center for Rural Policy’s most recent Food Access Report found that Humboldt County experiences the third-highest rate of food insecurity of California’s 58 counties. Food for People already serves 10% of our County’s population, distributing 2 million pounds of food annually – but this represents only half of the people in our county experiencing poverty, an issue that has been further strained by the pandemic and accompanying economic downturn.

But things are looking up! Back at 14th street, the water has been drained, and Food for People is on a new journey. The damaged building has been entirely demolished and construction of a new and improved facility is set to start in the next few months.

The new building will allow for exciting additions to Food for People’s services:

  • Additional warehouse space will enable Food for People to better support and enhance their countywide hunger relief services.
  • Make it possible for them to expand services and build space for partners to help connect people with a wider array of community support services that promote long-term stability and lead to a better quality of life.
  • Expand Job Training to improve employment prospects for people experiencing adversity by providing essential work skills.
  • Improve the quality of food provided by significantly expanding cold storage to prioritize healthy foods, safely accept and store more donated perishable foods and reduce food waste.
  • Increase space and resources for Disaster and Emergency Response to serve everyone impacted by the pandemic, wild fires, or any other natural disasters that might occur – which has never been more important.
  • Open the doors for a large, on site Choice Pantry to provide people with enough space to choose healthy foods with greater dignity to meet their personal dietary and cultural needs.

Food for People’s goal is to open their new doors for full use next fall. To make this possible, they are working to raise $5 million. Thanks to the generous support of lead donors and our community they have already received $4 million towards the project.

You can support this effort! Let’s put the dark days of 2020 behind us and look to a brighter future. Find out more at RebuildFoodforPeople.org or by contacting Food for People’s Development Director Carly Robbins at (707)445-3166 ext. 306 or crobbins@foodforpeople.org.

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Sunday, February 21, 2021

'Comida del Pueblo'

Posted By on Sun, Feb 21, 2021 at 6:25 AM

Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden. - CENTRO DEL PUEBLO
  • Centro del Pueblo
  • Brenda Perez with Adan Cervantes Perez at a community garden.
Centro del Pueblo is launching a new gardening program this spring that would empower Humboldt County’s Latinx community to learn and share their gardening knowledge says Karina Coronado, a Centro del Pueblo volunteer who is spearheading the program.

“Comida del Pueblo” will provide herbs and vegetables for micro-gardening, spaces in community gardens for full gardening and offer skill-share classes outdoors, following social distancing guidelines.

Centro del Pueblo began planting seeds for starters that they will give to participants and is currently reaching out to other organizations to collaborate with for more gardening opportunities.

“I think this is a very special opportunity that I get to be a part of,” Coronado says. “There’s so much knowledge to share especially during a pandemic.”

Adan Cervantes Perez, who is also spearheading the effort, would like the program to be an opportunity for families to share intergenerational knowledge and experiences with their children.
CENTRO DEL PUEBLO
  • Centro del Pueblo


“I’m from Puebla, Mexico, I’ve been here in the U.S., California for 20 years and I’ve noticed that a few kids have lost a lot of their heritage, that they only know a few things from their culture, the rice, beans, corn but not how it’s cultivated and made,” Perez says in Spanish. “From the bottom of my heart, through the program, I would just like to share the knowledge that I learned from my hometown here so that we don’t lose those customs.”

The program would make access to food easier for the Latinx community but the most important goal of “Comida del Pueblo” is to establish a knowledge-sharing network of food and medicine cultivators to teach families about the importance of food.

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Sunday, February 7, 2021

From the Journal Archives: Crabby Patty Cravings

Posted By on Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 12:00 PM

The Krusty Krab has nothing on classic egg foo yung with Dungeness. - PHOTO BY WENDY CHAN
  • Photo by Wendy Chan
  • The Krusty Krab has nothing on classic egg foo yung with Dungeness.
Editor's note: Looking for a new way to prepare that fresh crab the North Coast is blessed with this time of year? Wendy Chan has you covered with her Crab Foo Yung recipe from the Journal's achieves, a dish inspired by all those times her sons watched SpongeBob SquarePants while growing up.

The Krabby Patty from SpongeBob SquarePants has been stuck in my head for years. From the time my kids enjoyed watching SpongeBob, I heard "Krabby Patty" over and over. I assumed it was a crab cake patty because there was a crab walking around in the show. I swear, for all these years I thought it was crabby with a "C," not "Krabby," until I Googled it yesterday. When I told my boys, now grown, they laughed. Jay said it's a secret formula so no one actually knows what the patty is made of, but it looks like a meat patty. Well, my version of a crabby patty looks like the classic Chinese egg foo yung my dad used to make in the morning before the restaurant he worked at opened. There were always at least a few dozen on the grill. They were big sellers with combination plates but I always liked mine with seafood.

Since our crab season is finally here, I'm jumping with joy. I love fresh crab for sandwiches, sautéed with ginger and scallions, in crab cheese puffs and crab foo yung. For the past weeks I have been going to the dock and Wild Planet often to buy live crab. The meat is firm and sweet, a true delight for those of us living by the coast. Here, I'm sharing two of my favorite easy recipes with you. Let's get cracking.

Crab Foo Yung

Serves 4.

Ingredients:

2 cups fresh cooked crab meat

4 eggs, beaten

2 cups chopped bean spouts

½ cup finely chopped yellow onion

1 cup finely chopped celery

1 teaspoon minced ginger

½ cup chopped green onion

Salt and pepper to taste

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

Black sesame seeds for garnish (optional)

Blanch the bean sprouts, celery and yellow onion in boiling water for 2 minutes. Drain them in a colander and set them aside to cool completely. Then place them in a mixing bowl, adding the crab meat, eggs, ginger, green onion, salt and pepper. Stir and mix well. Heat up a flat bottomed pan over medium-high heat and add 1 tablespoon of oil. Once the oil is hot, spoon in about 3 heaping tablespoons of crab mixture per patty. Fry only a few patties per batch, leaving at least an inch of space between them. Cook for about 2 minutes until golden, turning halfway through. Add oil to the pan as needed. Serve plain, with a sprinkle of black sesame seeds, topped with gravy or with ketchup, the way my kids like them.

Crab Cheese Puffs

Makes about 24-28 puffs.

Ingredients:

For the filling:

2 cups fresh crab meat

1 cup cream cheese at room temperature

¼ cup shredded mozzarella

¼ cup chopped green onion

1 to 2 finely chopped Tien Tsin or Chinese red chilis (optional)

1 tablespoon sugar

1 teaspoon white pepper

For the wrappers:

1 package wonton wrappers

1 beaten egg for sealing wrappers

6 cups vegetable oil for frying

Using your hands, mix all the filling ingredients together. Let the mixture sit for 20 minutes. Cover a baking sheet with wax paper or sprinkle it with flour. Place 1 tablespoon of the filling in the center of each wrapper. Brush the edges of the wrapper with egg and fold it diagonally into a triangle, pinching to seal it tightly. Place the sealed puffs on the baking sheet, leaving space between them.

In a deep pot, heat the oil until a cooking thermometer reads 330 F. Fry a few at a time for less than 1 minute per side until golden and puffy. Remove and let them cool on a wire rack or plate lined with paper towels. Serve with sweet and sour or sweet chili sauce.

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Wednesday, January 20, 2021

A 'Selfless' Life Cut Short: Esteban Gonzalez's unlikely journey into the hearts of Arcata

Posted By on Wed, Jan 20, 2021 at 4:53 PM

Esteban Gonzalez poses for a picture for the Journal’s 2016 Best of Humboldt edition. - FILE
  • File
  • Esteban Gonzalez poses for a picture for the Journal’s 2016 Best of Humboldt edition.
Esteban Gonzalez, an Arcata restaurant owner beloved by many, known in equal parts for his tireless work ethic, his good food and willingness to offer a hand up to anyone who needed it, died Jan. 12 of pneumonia. He was 55.

Amid an outpouring of support in the wake of his death, Gonzalez is being hailed in social media posts as a “local legend” and a “pillar” of the Arcata community, remembered as a ray of positivity who smiled easily and was quick to share what he had, whether it be a piece of wisdom or a burrito. Arcata Main Street set up a GoFundMe page Jan. 17 with the goal of raising $1,000 to benefit Gonzalez’s family. When this edition of the Journal went to press two days later, the page had collected more than $24,000, with donations continuing to pour in.

The Mad River Union reported Gonzalez’s death stemmed from complications related to COVID-19, though the Journal was unable to independently confirm that reporting.

That Gonzalez’s life saw him become a community fixture in Arcata is a testament to the power of a dream, having the courage to chase it relentlessly and what can be accomplished when hard work becomes a daily ritual.

Continue reading »

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Monday, January 11, 2021

Rough Seas Delaying Crab Pot Deployment

Posted By on Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 5:16 PM

Crab should be coming soon. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Crab should be coming soon.
It’s beginning to look a lot like local Dungeness crab will soon be heading to tables across Humboldt County now that price negotiations have been settled, according to multiple media reports.

But all things being Humboldt, dangerous conditions, including a gale warning, an atmospheric river ladened with rain and heavy seas are delaying the deployment of pots until later in the week.

“We have come up with a gentleman’s agreement to set gear on Thursday at 8 a.m.,” said Harrison Ibach, president of the Humboldt Fishermen’s Marketing Association, told the Times-Standard.

A gale warning from the Eureka office of the National Weather Service, in effect now until 3 a.m. Wednesday from Point St. George to Cape Mendocino, states “strong winds will cause hazardous seas which could capsize or damage vessels and reduce visibility.”

A westerly swell is expected to peak Tuesday at 17 to 18 feet but another one is expected to move through local waters Friday into Saturday, bringing 15 to 16 foot seas. Heavy rain is also expected to hit northern Humboldt, Del Norte County and the King Range, periods of which are “most likely during the day on Tuesday,” NWS states.

🦀Setting soon!!! We are excited to say we should be setting crab gear as soon as next week. The ocean is still rough...

Posted by Ashley’s Seafood on Friday, January 8, 2021

And, amid all of this, King Tides are expected to cause some minor coastal flooding Tuesday and a high surf advisory will be in effect from 7 a.m. Tuesday to 8 a.m. Wednesday, with breaking waves in the 22- to 25-foot range.
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Tuesday, December 22, 2020

Eureka Natural Foods' Change 4 Change Program Raises $5,000 for Food for People

Posted By on Tue, Dec 22, 2020 at 2:30 PM

L to R: Craig Calvin - McKinleyville Store Manager, - Carly Robbins - Food For People Development Director, - Anne Holcomb - Food For People Executive Director, - Truman Felt - McKinleyville cashier who raised the most funds at $501, - Stacey Wolfe - McKinleyville cashier who the third most amount at $248.
  • L to R: Craig Calvin - McKinleyville Store Manager,Carly Robbins - Food For People Development Director,Anne Holcomb - Food For People Executive Director,Truman Felt - McKinleyville cashier who raised the most funds at $501,Stacey Wolfe - McKinleyville cashier who the third most amount at $248.

Eureka Natural Foods and its customers raised $5,000 for Food for People through the Change 4 Change program, where the rounding up of a few cents on the dollar during checkout adds up to a huge difference in the lives of others. 

"Within one week the community came together and raised $5,000 to help eliminate hunger and improve the health of the community," a press release from Eureka Natural Foods states. "This is the most amount that has been raised during a Change 4 Change. Currently as the world spins, this means more to Eureka Natural Foods and Food for People than ever. A rough year, but now the light we all have been waiting for. Seeing the community raise this amount during a time of need for all, it is truly a cherished moment."

Food for People works to alleviate local hunger and improve the health of the community through its 18 programs and strong community partnerships. The nonprofit distributes nearly 2 million pounds of food annually to the county’s most
vulnerable members.

For more, read the full press release below:
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Saturday, December 12, 2020

Commercial Crab Season Set to Open Dec. 23

Posted By on Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 6:25 PM

Commercial Dungeness crab season to open Dec. 23. - C. JUHASZ/CDFW WEBSITE
  • C. Juhasz/CDFW website
  • Commercial Dungeness crab season to open Dec. 23.
Get that butter ready.

The commercial Dungeness crab season is slated to start statewide on Dec. 23 after being delayed due to meat quality in the Humboldt region and whale entanglement concerns farther south.

“Our recommendation was to open this Wednesday (Dec. 16),” said California Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Charlton H. Bonham in a news release. “But after hearing from parts of the fleet expressing a variety of views, and review of additional scientific information provided by Working Group experts, we decided on an additional seven-day delay.

"This gives the fleet extra time to get ready and get their gear in the water, certainty in that we’re opening statewide, hopefully the chance to get part of the holiday market and an additional seven days for any remaining whales to migrate," he continued. "We support any additional measures the fleet or specific ports wish to take to minimize entanglements and also understand the additional hardships resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. CDFW staff, collaborators and partners have worked hard to collect data to inform a unified statewide opener.”

Read the CDFW release below: 
Proving that the Risk Assessment Mitigation Program is successfully striking a balance between the needs of the commercial Dungeness crab fleet and protection of marine life, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will open the commercial season statewide on Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2020, allowing the fleet a chance to get Dungeness crab on California tables before the holiday season ends.

This statewide opener ends delays in place due to mea
t
dcrab.png
quality in the northern management area (NMA) and the potential for whale entanglement in the central management area (CMA). It also gives the fleet ample time for planning and gear preparation and promotes an orderly start to the fishery. For the NMA Fishing Zones 1 and 2, the pre-soak period will begin Sunday, Dec. 20 at 8:01 a.m. and for the CMA, Fishing Zones 3, 4, 5 and 6, the pre-soak period will begin Tuesday, Dec. 22 at 6:01 a.m.

Available data indicates some whales remain in the fishing grounds but risk is declining and CDFW supports a balanced approach to managing risk and providing opportunity for the commercial fishery that is grounded in expert science. Whale entanglement risk still exists, but it is low. Thus, the opening declaration is accompanied by an notice to the fleet to use best fishing practices and avoid areas where whales may be congregating including around the canyon edges of Monterey, and between the Farallon Islands and Point Reyes.

Crabbers are encouraged to review the Best Practices Guide and remember to minimize knots and line scope when fishing. Recent survey data indicate most whales have started their annual migration out of the fishing grounds. Based on these data, CDFW made a preliminary recommendation to open the fishery statewide on Wednesday, Dec. 16.

The Whale Entanglement Working Group evaluated all available data and did not provide a consensus recommendation to open or delay. After the Working Group meeting, the majority of ports requested further delay of the opener.

“Our recommendation was to open this Wednesday,” said CDFW Director Charlton H. Bonham. “But after hearing from parts of the fleet expressing a variety of views, and review of additional scientific information provided by Working Group experts, we decided on an additional seven-day delay. This gives the fleet extra time to get ready and get their gear in the water, certainty in that we’re opening statewide, hopefully the chance to get part of the holiday market and an additional seven days for any remaining whales to migrate. We support any additional measures the fleet or specific ports wish to take to minimize entanglements and also understand the additional hardships resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. CDFW staff, collaborators and partners have worked hard to collect data to inform a unified statewide opener.”

Since late October, CDFW in partnership with researchers, federal agencies and the fishing industry has conducted surveys from the Oregon state line to the Channel Islands to observe marine life concentrations. Based on recent aerial surveys and observation data, whales have begun to migrate out of California waters to their winter breeding grounds, which in turn reduces the risk of entanglement when the commercial fishery opens.

Through the course of the crab season, CDFW will engage regularly with the Working Group to review scientific information and advice efforts to minimize the risk of whale and sea turtle entanglements while maximizing fishing opportunity. Based on that process, CDFW may take additional management actions in response to future risk assessments. For more information related to the risk assessment process or this delay, please visit CDFW’s Whale Safe Fisheries page. For more information related to the risk assessment process or this delay, please visit CDFW’s Whale Safe Fisheries page or for more information on Dungeness crab, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/crab.
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Monday, December 7, 2020

How to Help: The Humboldt Holiday Food Drive

Posted By on Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 11:09 AM

ffp-tzr.jpg
The Humboldt Holiday Food Drive is happening this week to benefit Food for People, which is seeing an increased need this year amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Non-perishable food items can be dropped off at:

• Eureka Co-op, Fourth and B streets in Eureka: Monday, Dec. 7, from 11 a.m. to  1 p.m. or 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

• Wildberries, 747 18th St. in Arcata: Tuesday, Dec. 8, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. or 3 p.m. – 6 p.m.

• Safeway, 2555 Harris St. in Eureka: Thursday, Dec. 10, 3:00 p.m. to 6 p.m, which will see KHUM and state Sen. Mike McGuire teaming up for a drive up and donate event.

Food for People is encouraging those who are able to make a tax-deductible donation or to host a virtual food drive to raise funds, noting that it can purchase three bags of food for what the average person would pay for one using its wholesale buying ability, in effect tripling the contribution.

Also, the nonprofit that serves more than 12,000 people a month has limited space to store food donations due to devastating damage at its main building caused by the sewer back up in late February, just before COVID shutdowns began.

Visit the Food for People website here to find out more ways to help or to receive assistance.
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