August 21, 2018 Slideshows

Klamath Salmon Festival 2018 

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Photo by Mark Larson
Hundreds lined up to eat the freshly cooked Klamath River salmon served by students from Del Norte County.
Photo by Mark Larson
Jordee Gulley, of Hawkin's Bar, was announced as first place in the Noo-Rey-O-Won-Ee (beautiful girl inside and out) contest and Sofia Gomez-Ferris (not pictured), of Eureka, received second place.
Photo by Mark Larson
Joseph Nix, of Hoopa, played in his family and friend's flatbed entry prior to the annual parade.
Photo by Mark Larson
Donovan Gensaw, of Klamath, placed more fresh salmon skewered on a redwood stick to cook around the open fire.
Photo by Mark Larson
Players in the stick game try to wrestle down their opponents to give an advantage to teammates who try to hook the tossel across the end line.
Photo by Mark Larson
Under the supervision of adult coaches, young players worked to hook the "tossel" with their sticks and fling it up or down river toward their team's end line for a goal.
Photo by Mark Larson
The stick game tournament featured teams in different age brackets under the supervision of adult coaches. Here the young player worked to hook the "tossel" with his stick and fling it up or down river toward his team's end line for a goal.
Photo by Mark Larson
Even Bigfoot showed up to participate in the early morning Ney-Puey Color Run.
Photo by Mark Larson
The traditional color guard with military veterans led off the annual parade and were followed by advocants of various causes with banners.
Photo by Mark Larson
Parading not far from the actual Klamath River, these advocates for the on-going process to remove dams on the river carried their banner near the front of the annual parade.
Photo by Mark Larson
Karianna John (4), of Reno, walked in the parade dressed in her role as Tiny Tot Princess of the Sacred Vision Powwow at the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation in Wadsworth, Nevada.
Photo by Mark Larson
Shane Quinn and others from the Yurok Tribal Fisheries Program brought to the annual parade the "K-mos Tamers" river monster from ancient folklore.
Photo by Mark Larson
Margo Robbins, of Weitchpec, carried a hazel-stick basket to symbolize the positive effects of natural wildfire (the post-fire hazel sprouts grow long and straight) on the Cultural Fire Management Council's entry in the annual parade.
Photo by Mark Larson
In a Gensaw family tradition for the Salmon Festival, Sam and Donovan Gensaw helped their grandfather Danny Gensaw cook fresh salmon over an open fire.
Photo by Mark Larson
Frank Gensaw, of Klamath, helped filet the fresh Klamath River salmon prior to it being skewered on redwood sticks and placed to cook around the edge of an open fire.
Photo by Mark Larson
Karuk tribal member Denna Dodds, of Arcata, worked on her storage basket in the basket-weaving area. In a new addition to this year's event, seven expert traditional basket weavers from different local tribes worked in a tent area filled with ceremonial regalia, basketry and other cultural objects.
Photo by Mark Larson
Hand game players on the "hiding" team drum and sing in support of their team leader, as they also attempt to distract the "guessing" team opponent.
Photo by Mark Larson
Not just filets were cooked in a Gensaw family tradition for the Salmon Festival. Sam and Donovan Gensaw helped their grandfather Danny Gensaw monitor the cooking of fresh salmon over an open fire.
Photo by Mark Larson
Yurok tribal member Lena Hurd, of Cave Junction, demonstrated her basket-weaving skills.
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