Media

Saturday, April 13, 2019

KHSU Protesters at the Arcata Farmers Market

Posted By on Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 6:40 PM

Demonstrators unhappy with the firing of KHSU staffers and the suspension of local programming gathered into a protest walk around the farmers market area. - PHOTO BY MARK LARSON
  • Photo by Mark Larson
  • Demonstrators unhappy with the firing of KHSU staffers and the suspension of local programming gathered into a protest walk around the farmers market area.

More than 100 protestors gathered on the Arcata Plaza on Saturday morning to share their frustrations, sadness and anger about Humboldt State University's decision on Thursday to cut the community programming volunteers and most of the staff at KHSU-FM. (The remaining two staff members David Reed and Natalya Estrada have since resigned, as well.) The protesters mingled and shared theories about HSU's motives, before organizing into a protest march around the farmers market area on the plaza. See photos in the slideshow below.

"The fact that they did this right after the recent fund drive shows what a bad neighbor HSU has become," said Rick Levin, a former underwriter, volunteer musician for live shows and on-air helper during pledge drives. "And now they're blaming the community for not supporting it enough."

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Last Employee Leaves KHSU

Posted By on Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 3:09 PM

khsu_2018_cymk_transparent.png
KHSU’s Morning Host Natalya Estrada submitted her resignation to the university today, leaving the public radio station without a single employee just two days after the administration announced an across-the-board “reorganizing” that included laying off most of the staff and “indefinitely suspending” community-based programming.

Her departure follows that of David Reed — Humboldt State’s appointed choice to take over KHSU — who stepped down Friday, saying he declined the interim post and had not been consulted before the university sent out an announcement outlining changes at the station.

In a column sent to local media, Estrada explained her decision and her views on the events that have unfolded at the station in recent months, culminating in Thursday’s sweeping move, which the university said would result in “significant savings” with the intended goal of “preserving quality programming for the North Coast.”

Read previous Journal coverage here and here.

“Thank you all for letting me into your morning commute, for telling me your stories of hope, tragedy, triumph and love. Thank you for letting me speak your truths through an omni-directional microphone,” Estrada wrote. “Thank you for letting me take your photos and for calling me in the morning to let me know it’s White-THORN not Whitehorn. I will forever hold KHSU in my heart and memory as a place of acceptance, peace and home to the hardest working folks I’ve ever met.”


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Friday, April 12, 2019

Reed Steps Down at KHSU

Posted By on Fri, Apr 12, 2019 at 10:01 AM

KHSU's studio. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • KHSU's studio.
David Reed, one of two KHSU employees who were left with jobs after a sweeping shakeup at the university radio station yesterday, has resigned.

In a Facebook post, Reed said that he stepped down as of 7:30 a.m. and he had “declined the offer to be KHSU's acting director, an appointment that was made without consulting me.”

His information has been removed from KHSU’s website.

Reed’s decision comes in the wake of Humboldt State University’s decision to eliminate most of the station’s staff and “indefinitely suspend” most of the volunteer-run programing that was the hallmark of KHSU for decades.

Read more Journal coverage of the upheaval that left staff, volunteers and the community reeling here and here.

“To all of you who supported me and the station in my last 10 years, thank you from the bottom of my heart. Thank you especially to those of you who volunteered to be on the pledge drive last week,” Reed wrote. “We all made great community radio together, with your support. You can be proud of that.”
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Thursday, April 11, 2019

HSU Announces Staff Eliminations, Major Changes at KHSU

Posted By on Thu, Apr 11, 2019 at 10:35 AM

khsu.jpg
Humboldt State University today announced major changes and the elimination of seven positions at its public radio station KHSU, including General Manager Peter Fretwell, whose tenure was fraught with controversy after the sudden firing of longtime program and operations director Katie Whiteside in May.

Along with the staff reductions, which the university release states will result in “significant savings,” all volunteer-run programs are under “indefinite suspension,” according to the release.

No administrators are quoted in this morning’s announcement, which states the goal of “reorganizing and streamlining operations” is “preserving quality programming for the North Coast.”

KHSU’s roots date back to the 1930s and one of its iterations — KHSC — became the first licensed non-commercial FM station in the California university and state college systems.

But recent troubles, triggered by Whiteside’s firing and the ensuing fallout, along with what many saw as major incursions into operations by university staff have caused friction at the station and in the community.

Read more about those issues in previous Journal coverage here, here and here.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

A 'Dark Day' at KHSU

Posted By and on Thu, Apr 11, 2019 at 4:00 AM

KHSU staff and volunteers speak with passersby shortly after learning Humboldt State University administrators had decided to gut the station's staff and suspend almost all volunteer programming indefinitely. - THADEUS GREENSON
  • Thadeus Greenson
  • KHSU staff and volunteers speak with passersby shortly after learning Humboldt State University administrators had decided to gut the station's staff and suspend almost all volunteer programming indefinitely.
The first sign arrived yesterday afternoon, when KHSU staff members received an email from Craig Wruck informing them there would be a mandatory meeting for all paid staff today at 9 a.m.

“I apologize for the extremely short notice, but this is an important meeting,” Wruck wrote.

When staff arrived for the meeting this morning at the new studio space in Feuerwerker House, however, they were separated. Morning Edition host Natalya Estrada and Development Director David Reed were sent to another building on campus, where they were informed of the changes and the fact that they would be the only staff members spared in the reorganization, with Reed being named interim station director. Meanwhile, Wruck was informing the balance of the staff that their positions were being eliminated, effective immediately.

As this was happening, 32-year volunteer Ed Campbell, who hosts “A Wandering Ear,” showed up to prepare for his 10 a.m. show to find his keycard no longer worked.

KHSU's studio. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • KHSU's studio.
He knocked and Wruck reportedly agreed to let him in to do his classical music show. He played about an hour’s worth of music before putting on Russian composer Igor Stravinsky’s “Requiem Canticles.” As it played, he walked out, later explaining that Wruck and administrators could deal with the dead air. Campbell said he chose “Requiem Canticles” as the last thing he’d ever play over the station’s airwaves because it was the last significant piece Stravinsky composed and has “a bunch of finality to it.”

Outside, KHSU Producer Jessica Eden smiled and hugged volunteers who stopped by to inquire what was going on. A University Police Department patrol car sat parked nearby.

“It was a great station and we really put our hearts into it for years and years,” Eden said. “They’ve just destroyed a beautiful community resource. Shame on them.”

The upheaval included Peter Fretwell, whose tenure as general manager was fraught with controversy after the sudden firing of longtime program and operations director Katie Whiteside in May.

Along with the staff reductions, which the university press release states will result in “significant savings,” all volunteer-run programs are under “indefinite suspension.”

Eden pointed out that administrators announced this decision just days after KHSU finished a community pledge drive trumpeting how listener’s donations would support local programing. The pledge drive hadn’t fully met its goal but was widely considered to have been successful, staff said, noting that some donors and sustaining members who had walked away from the station last May in the wake of the controversial firing of longtime program and operations director Katie Whiteside firing had come back.

“Then they do this right after they took people’s money,” one volunteer grumbled.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

HSU's El Leñador Wins Multiple Awards

Posted By on Tue, Mar 19, 2019 at 3:07 PM

El Leñador 2018 issues. - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • El Leñador 2018 issues.
Humboldt State University’s El Leñador newspaper won six first place awards in the 2019 California College Media Association statewide awards competition this year.

“I can’t be more proud of our El Leñador staff,” Jose Herrera, current editor-in-chief said in the press release. “The awards are a sign that we are doing incredible work covering the community.”

Founded in 2013, the bilingual El Leñador “focuses on covering Latinx and diverse community at HSU and Humboldt County,” the press release said. The bilingual newspaper won its first-place awards for Best Photo Series, Best Feature Photograph, Best Feature, Best Illustration, Best Website, and Best Inside Spread/Page Design and placed in six other additional categories. In 2016, El Leñador was named best non-weekly student newspaper by Excellence in Student Media Awards.

“These awards are a testament to the appreciation and value of news that is diverse and inclusive,” Andrea Juarez, the newspapers faculty advisor said. “El Leñador staff are passionate about producing news that is impactful and matters.”


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Monday, March 18, 2019

North Coast Night Lights: Here at the Edge

Posted By on Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 10:57 AM

DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
The vastness of things often comes home to me while I’m photographing at the edge of the continent or beneath the stars. To the east is the grounding solidity of the great North American land mass, to the west the immense Pacific Ocean stretches far beyond the horizon, and above, the field of stars. And there I am, just a tiny thing standing unnoticed.

Right next to that thought is the realization that it’s all relative. How very small these things are, like landmasses. Or the planet itself. Think about it: If you stood far enough out from our globe that the Earth was about golf ball size in your view, how small would be that film of atmosphere clinging to its surface? Could you even see it? At that scale, it wouldn’t take much to wipe it right off …
Lights from shore illuminate this great chunk of rock here where the wild coastline intersects with humanity. Above, a satellite’s eye in the sky so high crawled slowly past Orion. Humboldt County, California. February 22, 2019. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • Lights from shore illuminate this great chunk of rock here where the wild coastline intersects with humanity. Above, a satellite’s eye in the sky so high crawled slowly past Orion. Humboldt County, California. February 22, 2019.
It’s easy to get lost in a feeling of tininess when I realize that everything we understand about the universe is, in fact, a ridiculously minuscule amount of information next to what’s out there not yet understood, most of which will never be known by us. We learn and grow in our understanding of the universe around us all the time as we observe and experiment, but we will never be able to fit into our heads, nor into all the computer banks our civilization will ever produce, a complete model that describes it all. There are a lot of variables.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, January 25, 2019

'Sweet Victory' for SpongeBob Fans at the Super Bowl? Stay Tuned

Posted By on Fri, Jan 25, 2019 at 1:48 PM

Stephen Hillenburg - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • Stephen Hillenburg
Fans of SpongeBob SquarePants aren’t looking back in their months-long effort to have “Sweet Victory” sung during half time at the Super Bowl as an ode to Stephen Hillenburg, creator of the fantastical world Bikini Bottoms, who died Nov. 27.

More than 1 million people have signed the Change.org petition to honor the 57-year-old Humboldt State University graduate, who announced last March that he had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a neurodegenerative disease more commonly known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease.

“As some of you may or may not know, Stephen Hillenburg — the creator of SpongeBob SquarePants — has passed away recently,” the petition reads. “As a tribute to his legacy, his contributions to a generation of children and to truly showcase the greatness of this song, we call for Sweet Victory to be performed at the Halftime Show.”


Half time headliner Maroon 5 set the Twittersphere a twitter earlier this month when the band released a Super Bowl teaser that includes a brief appearance by SpongeBob. (Check out the 32 second mark.)



Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

Local Healthcare Company Focus of WaPo Story

Posted By on Wed, Dec 26, 2018 at 10:03 AM

Michael Fratkin. - TOBIN PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Tobin Photography
  • Michael Fratkin.
In case you missed it, The Washington Post recently put a spotlight on local palliative care company ResolutionCare.

The Post’s story, which published Dec. 15, uses the story of Hoopa brothers-in-law Gordon Surber and Mark Hailey — both of whom have been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease — to explore the impact of palliative care and the inequities of how insurers cover the costs. The story notes that while Congress has mandated that insurers provide coverage for hospice care, they have not taken similar steps for palliative care.

“Like hospice, palliative care includes a physician’s help in managing pain and other symptoms, the services of a social worker and a home health nurse, and spiritual counseling,” the article states. “Unlike hospice, it can be provided at any stage of illness and it can be offered alongside curative care.”


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sunday, December 23, 2018

A Hostage For 5 Years, Former HSU Professor Alann Steen Dies

Posted By on Sun, Dec 23, 2018 at 1:26 PM

Alann Steen (left) in 1992 at HSU as a Hadley Lecture speaker, following his release from captivity, with Mark Larson (center) and Howard Seemann of the journalism department. - COURTESY OF MICHAEL HARMON
  • Courtesy of Michael Harmon
  • Alann Steen (left) in 1992 at HSU as a Hadley Lecture speaker, following his release from captivity, with Mark Larson (center) and Howard Seemann of the journalism department.
Alann Steen, a former Humboldt State University journalism professor who was catapulted into the international spotlight when he was held hostage in Beirut for nearly five years, has died. He was 79.

Steen, who also earned double master’s degrees at HSU after a six-year stint in the U.S. Marines Corps, which included being briefly deployed outside of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis, was living in Washington state at the time of his death.

According to an obituary by his family, Steen was surrounded by “his girls” who “loved him more than words can express” when he succumbed to cancer after a “short but heroic battle” on Dec. 13.

Steen departed HSU to teach at Chico State University before leaving to become a journalism professor at Beirut University College in 1983. He was kidnapped from the campus Jan. 24, 1987, with three of his colleagues before being released Dec. 3, 1991.

The father of three and grandfather of four was the “eighth longest-held Western hostage freed” in Lebanon at the time of his release, which was the result of “complex negotiations” done by United Nations that also included exchanges of prisoners held by Israel for Israeli servicemen missing in Lebanon, according to a New York Times article.

In a December 1991 interview with the Journal, Steen said he never gave up hope during his captivity.


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Recent Comments">

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2019 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation