Media

Thursday, July 11, 2019

EPD Identifies Juvenile Responsible for Hate Group Fliers, Says no Immediate Threat of Violence

Posted By on Thu, Jul 11, 2019 at 3:35 PM

FILE
  • FILE
UPDATE:
The Eureka Police Department has issued a press release with some additional information, which can be found here.

PREVIOUSLY:
The Eureka Police Department has identified a male juvenile believed to be responsible for posting white supremacist recruiting fliers around town, interviewed him and determined there doesn’t appear to be an immediate physical threat to the community.

“He was identified with the assistance of family,” EPD Chief Steve Watson said. “In fact, a family member brought him in here very concerned. The family is very upset to find out what happened and to find out their son was involved in this. They did the right thing, which we very much appreciate.”

Watson said there's no indication that the hate group referenced on the flier has much of a local foothold.

“It does not appear at this stage as if there is some large, active group here in Humboldt County,” Watson said. “He may have acted alone.”

EPD became aware of the fliers yesterday, after a picture of one posted in the Henderson Center area in the morning began circulating on social media. Emblazoned with the image of an assault rifle, the flier read: “White youth! This entire system hates you and wants to see our race dead organize with us and bring an end to it.” The flier included an email address and the name of a hate group tied to a blog spot web page started earlier this month that included a manifesto outlining its ideology, which is militant, anti-establishment, anti-Semitic and overtly racist. Among other things, the site contained references to America being “infested” by minorities, saying the country was “never meant to be a melting pot” but a “shining beacon of true Aryan spirit.”

Watson said EPD identified the juvenile believed to be responsible — who Watson described as being “multi-racial” — last night and interviewed him this morning.

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Wednesday, July 10, 2019

KHSU Hit by Cyber Attack

Posted By on Wed, Jul 10, 2019 at 12:29 PM

KHSU's studio. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • KHSU's studio.
The dead air you’ve been hearing on KHSU is the result of a ransomeware attack that disabled most of the station’s programming systems and storage servers, according to Humboldt State University.

A university spokesperson tells the Journal the university does not yet know whether the cyber attack on the station was the result of a broader fishing effort, a targeted ransom attack or an act of sabotage potentially carried out by someone upset with the university’s decision to eliminate the vast majority of the station’s staff and local programming back in April.

According to a press release, the servers affected by the attack did not house sensitive information and while these kinds of malware attacks often come with a ransom request, the university has not “received a specific payment demand.”

Noting that KHSU is federally licensed, the university press release notes the incident was reported to federal law enforcement and the Federal Communications Commission.

In the meantime, KHSU programming — which has consisted of feeds from affiliates in Sacramento and Chico since the station’s gutting — continues to be interrupted.

“The university hopes to have this resolved as soon as possible as it rebuilds programming and improves the security of KHSU,” the press release states.

See the full press release copied below:

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Sunday, June 30, 2019

HSU Professor's Book Nabs Prestigious International Award

Posted By on Sun, Jun 30, 2019 at 11:47 AM

Cutcha Risling Baldy accepting her award. - SUBMITTED
  • submitted
  • Cutcha Risling Baldy accepting her award.
Humboldt State University Native American Studies department chair and Journal contributor Cutcha Risling Baldy’s first book was just honored at the Native American Indigenous Studies Conference in New Zealand.

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We are Dancing for You: Native Feminisms and the Revitalization of Women’s Coming-of-age Ceremonies was named the Best First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies on Friday night at the conference, which draws more than 1,000 scholars working in the fields of Native American and Indigenous studies throughout the world.

If Risling Baldy’s book sounds familiar, it should. The Journal ran an excerpt from it as our Aug. 2, 2018, cover story, “The Flower Dancers.” We suggest you check out the excerpt here and pick up a copy, available at local book stores. And check out Risling Baldy’s other columns for the Journal here, including her most recent offering, “How We Let This Happen,” which takes on issues of concentration camps detaining migrant children and the genocide of Native people in California.

And please join us in giving Risling Baldy a hearty congratulations on this prestigious honor.
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Monday, June 17, 2019

Journal Named a Finalist for two National Awards

Posted By on Mon, Jun 17, 2019 at 10:44 AM

SHUTTERSTOCK
  • Shutterstock
The accolades keep coming. We were proud to report last month that the Journal took home a dozen awards from the California Newspaper Publishers Association’s annual statewide contest, and we’re prouder today to announce that we’ve been named a finalist in two categories in the esteemed national Association of Alternative Newsmedia’s annual throwdown.

The association, which counts dozens of alternative weeklies, including the Journal, as its members, with a combined print and online circulation of more than 38 million, hosts the annual contest, which sees papers from throughout the country compete in an array of categories. And while most newspaper contests break their entries into circulation categories — meaning papers compete against others roughly their size, AAN’s contest has no such distinctions, which leaves the plucky Journal to compete against behemoths like the Chicago Reader, Philadelphia Weekly and Baltimore City Paper. This makes the awards all the more coveted and all the more elusive.

So it’s with great pride that we report that the Journal was chosen as a finalist from dozens of entries in the categories of Best Column and Best Special Section.

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Monday, May 20, 2019

The New Yorker Does Humboldt

Posted By on Mon, May 20, 2019 at 12:42 PM

SCREENSHOT
  • Screenshot
Humboldt County just got The New Yorker treatment.

The lead story on the magazine’s website today, “How Legalization Changed Humboldt County Marijuana,” takes a deep dive into Humboldt County’s cannabis industry, its roots and its future. Spoiler alert: The piece isn’t entirely optimistic.

“Before legalization, people grew cannabis however they could and developed methods to avoid getting caught by law enforcement,” writes Emily Witt. “Regulation demands a different set of skills. Instead of loading their crop into duffel bags and sending it out of state, they have to learn branding and marketing. Legalization brings with it the costs of taxes, permitting, compliance and new competitors. It has also occasioned a rapid drop in price. Now Humboldt County is experiencing not only an economic crisis but also an existential one. What happens to a group of people whose anti-government ethos was sustained by an illegal plant that is now the most regulated crop in California?”
It’s a good question.

It’s always interesting when a national heavyweight reports on Humboldt County, allowing us to see our issues and ourselves through an outsider’s eyes.

Take Witt’s description of Garberville:

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Tuesday, May 7, 2019

NCJ Snags a Dozen Awards at Statewide Journalism Contest

Posted By on Tue, May 7, 2019 at 12:08 PM

Journal staff (from left) Cassie Curatolo, Jennifer Fumiko Cahill, Kimberly Wear, Kyle Windham, Judy Hodgson, Thadeus Greenson, Kali Cozyris, Lynn Leishman, Sam Leishman, Melissa Sanderson (with Whitney), Mark Boyd, Deborah Henry, Iridian Casarez, Marna Batsell, Bryan Walker and Amy Waldrip. Not pictured: Chuck Leishman, Holly Harvey, Jonathan Webster, Miles Eggleston, Jacqueline Langeland, Tyler Tibbles and Zach Lathouris. - ZACH LATHOURIS
  • Zach Lathouris
  • Journal staff (from left) Cassie Curatolo, Jennifer Fumiko Cahill, Kimberly Wear, Kyle Windham, Judy Hodgson, Thadeus Greenson, Kali Cozyris, Lynn Leishman, Sam Leishman, Melissa Sanderson (with Whitney), Mark Boyd, Deborah Henry, Iridian Casarez, Marna Batsell, Bryan Walker and Amy Waldrip. Not pictured: Chuck Leishman, Holly Harvey, Jonathan Webster, Miles Eggleston, Jacqueline Langeland, Tyler Tibbles and Zach Lathouris.

The California Newspaper Publishers Association held its annual awards gala over the weekend and we are pleased to announce the Journal took home 12 awards, including top honors in four categories.

The association, which was founded in 1888 and has more than 500 member papers throughout the state, holds the annual California Journalism Awards contest to showcase and honor the state’s best journalism in a variety of categories across several circulation divisions. Submissions are graded by a panel of judges from CNPA member papers’ newsrooms, with the top five in each category receiving honors.

Here’s a quick rundown of the categories in which the Journal received an award — finishing in the top five — and a brief explanation of the work and who created it. We are proud of our winning writers, designers and illustrators, and those sales and administrative staff who do the unseen hard work that makes each issue possible. And we offer a huge thank you to the community of readers who support us, without whom none of this would be possible.

A brief look at the awards:

First Place Arts and Entertainment Coverage to Journal Arts and Features Editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill, Calendar Editor Kali Cozyris, a small army of freelancers and the Journal’s production staff. This is the fourth time the Journal has taken home top honors for arts and entertainment coverage in the last five years. One of this year’s judges notes: “A very nice local A&E section with sharp graphic design, lively writing and headlines, and very comprehensive coverage of community events. Nicely done.”

First Place Profile Story for Thadeus Greenson’s “A Giant Falls Among the Redwoods,” a profile of the late John Hudson, a Purple Heart war veteran, caregiver, advocate, community organizer and Sister of Perpetual Indulgence.

First Place Special Section for the June 7 Media Literacy Issue, which featured a variety of news and opinion pieces aimed at helping readers better understand how the Journal — and media in general — operates.

First Place for Special Publication for the summer/fall edition of Humboldt Insider. One judge’s take: “Publication is very well done and serving the area with quality writing, useful information and great graphic design and promotions.”


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Thursday, April 18, 2019

Letter from Legislators: KHSU Gutting a 'Slap in the Face'

Posted By on Thu, Apr 18, 2019 at 11:19 AM

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Adding to a growing list, current and former North Coast legislators are calling on the California State University Chancellor’s Office to suspend any decision-making on the future of KHSU until new top administrators arrive at Humboldt State University.

HSU President Lisa Rossbacher and Vice President of Advancement Craig Wruck, who oversees KHSU, are both slated to retire this year.

State Sen. Mike McGuire, Assemblymember Jim Wood, retired state Sen. Wes Chesbro and retired Assemblymember Patty Berg penned a strongly worded letter that describes HSU’s decision to gut the public radio station as “a slap in the face to Humboldt County and the North Coast.”

“The reckless manner and timing of HSU shutting down this amazing station could not have been worse and it’s time for the long-term decision making by a short-term administration to stop,” the letter states. “Major decisions made behind closed doors, and with zero transparency, simply do not work for this community. It hurts the credibility of the University and makes everyone’s job harder (especially the incoming President). There was absolutely no reason for this situation to unfold as it has and we want it to stop.”

Find previous Journal coverage on the situation here, here, here and here or pick up this week's edition.

Read the full letter below:

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Wednesday, April 17, 2019

KHSU Dismantling Rebuked, KEET Board to Discuss Possible Radio Venture

Posted By on Wed, Apr 17, 2019 at 1:54 PM

KHSU's studio. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • KHSU's studio.
The recent turmoil at KHSU and the possibility of exploring a radio endeavor will be one of the discussion topics at KEET’s Board of Directors meeting Thursday but no decisions are slated to be made at this point, according to station Executive Director David Gordon.

Meanwhile, the Humboldt State University Department of Journalism and the University Senate have both come out against the administration’s decision to dismantle the campus public radio station, which stunned staff and the community.

In a Facebook posts and in an interview with the Journal, KEET’s Gordon emphasized that KHSU is just one topic on the agenda for the board’s regularly scheduled meeting and that time for public comment and seating will be limited.

“It’s just basically do we have any interest in pursuing any sort of radio venture,” Gordon said, noting recent events brought the issue to the forefront.


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Saturday, April 13, 2019

KHSU Protesters at the Arcata Farmers Market

Posted By on Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 6:40 PM

Demonstrators unhappy with the firing of KHSU staffers and the suspension of local programming gathered into a protest walk around the farmers market area. - PHOTO BY MARK LARSON
  • Photo by Mark Larson
  • Demonstrators unhappy with the firing of KHSU staffers and the suspension of local programming gathered into a protest walk around the farmers market area.

More than 100 protestors gathered on the Arcata Plaza on Saturday morning to share their frustrations, sadness and anger about Humboldt State University's decision on Thursday to cut the community programming volunteers and most of the staff at KHSU-FM. (The remaining two staff members David Reed and Natalya Estrada have since resigned, as well.) The protesters mingled and shared theories about HSU's motives, before organizing into a protest march around the farmers market area on the plaza. See photos in the slideshow below.

"The fact that they did this right after the recent fund drive shows what a bad neighbor HSU has become," said Rick Levin, a former underwriter, volunteer musician for live shows and on-air helper during pledge drives. "And now they're blaming the community for not supporting it enough."

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Last Employee Leaves KHSU

Posted By on Sat, Apr 13, 2019 at 3:09 PM

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KHSU’s Morning Host Natalya Estrada submitted her resignation to the university today, leaving the public radio station without a single employee just two days after the administration announced an across-the-board “reorganizing” that included laying off most of the staff and “indefinitely suspending” community-based programming.

Her departure follows that of David Reed — Humboldt State’s appointed choice to take over KHSU — who stepped down Friday, saying he declined the interim post and had not been consulted before the university sent out an announcement outlining changes at the station.

In a column sent to local media, Estrada explained her decision and her views on the events that have unfolded at the station in recent months, culminating in Thursday’s sweeping move, which the university said would result in “significant savings” with the intended goal of “preserving quality programming for the North Coast.”

Read previous Journal coverage here and here.

“Thank you all for letting me into your morning commute, for telling me your stories of hope, tragedy, triumph and love. Thank you for letting me speak your truths through an omni-directional microphone,” Estrada wrote. “Thank you for letting me take your photos and for calling me in the morning to let me know it’s White-THORN not Whitehorn. I will forever hold KHSU in my heart and memory as a place of acceptance, peace and home to the hardest working folks I’ve ever met.”


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