Monday, May 31, 2021

A Bit of Glory on the Plaza

Posted By on Mon, May 31, 2021 at 9:57 AM

June Moxon’s cheshire grin helps The Enchanted Slipper gloriously slip through the course. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • June Moxon’s cheshire grin helps The Enchanted Slipper gloriously slip through the course.

If this Memorial Day weekend has felt decidedly glory-less, with the Kinetic Grand Championship cancelled due to COVID-19 yet again, well, you're not alone. But a handful of Kinetic diehards took matters into their own hands Saturday, holding the Glorious and Official Unofficially Sanctioned 2021 Kinetic Grand Championship, which featured a handful of sculptures making a quick jaunt around the Arcata Plaza. Fortunately, local photographer Mark McKenna was there to capture the moment, and the glory.

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Sunday, May 30, 2021

North Coast Night Lights: iPhone 12 Pro Night Mode vs Nikon D750, D850

Posted By on Sun, May 30, 2021 at 12:29 PM

banner-2021-05-20_d850_trinidad-lighthouse_05.jpg
Before I purchased an iPhone 12 Pro, I was curious about the “night mode” that Apple had introduced in the previous model — how good was it? How would it stack up against my Nikons for the kind of nighttime photography I love so well? The reviews were very favorable, and many included amazing nighttime photographs shot using night mode. Could professional-level nighttime photography be built into such a small and useful device as an iPhone? I wanted to know. So I found out for myself.

This review is an entirely subjective comparison between the Apple iPhone 12 Pro night mode and the Nikon D750 and D850 DSLR's*. I wanted to find out how night mode performed the way that I would like to use it, which right now is nighttime landscape photography. Bear in mind that the iPhone 12 Pro is the current “Pro” model as of this writing (May of 2021), while the Nikon D750 was introduced seven years ago in 2014 and the Nikon D850 was introduced in 2017.

Night mode is amazingly capable and fun, but it also has some serious limitations. In some situations, it is remarkably good, but in the extreme low light of a moonlit landscape it will lose a lot of detail and produce a lot of digital noise.

The iPhone 12 Pro’s Night mode did very well on Arcata’s well-lit H Street at the Arcata Minor Theatre. With enough light from the city’s lights and passing cars, there was very little problem with noise (the grainy look). Compared to the Nikons, though, detail was lost in the highlights and shadows — note how the theatre’s name is blown out on the marquee. In all examples here, the size of the detail images reflect the higher resolutions of the Nikon D750 and D850, respectively. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • The iPhone 12 Pro’s Night mode did very well on Arcata’s well-lit H Street at the Arcata Minor Theatre. With enough light from the city’s lights and passing cars, there was very little problem with noise (the grainy look). Compared to the Nikons, though, detail was lost in the highlights and shadows — note how the theatre’s name is blown out on the marquee. In all examples here, the size of the detail images reflect the higher resolutions of the Nikon D750 and D850, respectively.

Using the iPhone’s built-in Camera app, night mode becomes available when the iPhone’s light meter detects a low light situation. In night mode, the camera will take a series of shots of the scene using different exposure settings, and then intelligently create the best image that it can from the series (an example of “computational photography”). The photographer can choose the duration of the night mode process, but one cannot adjust the actual shutter speeds involved.

The 68 percent waxing gibbous moon and the lights from Trinidad behind me were insufficient illumination for all but the brightest surfaces of the lighthouse for the iPhone 12 Pro Night mode. Compared to the Nikons, the image suffers when there is too little light. It looks ok on the phone, where it is small, and maybe it would be fine as a small image on social media, but it’s far too noisy (the grainy look) for me to print it as an enlargement. It simply needs more light; no doubt it would look better with a larger moon, but I doubt even full moonlight is enough. I look forward to trying this with a full moon. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • The 68 percent waxing gibbous moon and the lights from Trinidad behind me were insufficient illumination for all but the brightest surfaces of the lighthouse for the iPhone 12 Pro Night mode. Compared to the Nikons, the image suffers when there is too little light. It looks ok on the phone, where it is small, and maybe it would be fine as a small image on social media, but it’s far too noisy (the grainy look) for me to print it as an enlargement. It simply needs more light; no doubt it would look better with a larger moon, but I doubt even full moonlight is enough. I look forward to trying this with a full moon.
Longer durations allow objects that are in motion — like the cars and clouds shown — to blur as they move through the frame, but one has no control over the actual aperture, ISO and shutter speeds involved in any of the shots that make up the final night mode image; these will be automatically set by the camera.

Night mode shines best outside at night in fairly well-lit environments like city streets or similar areas such as the Woodley Island Marina examples included. It is also best if you can mount the iPhone on a stable tripod, but it will perform admirably even hand-held in those situations if you’re steady, as my 5-second and 10-second hand-held examples attest.

An 84 percent waxing moon and the lights of Eureka’s Woodley Island Marina provided enough light for the iPhone 12 Pro’s Night mode to make a good image. In fact, it looks great at first glance. But zooming in (see the Details), one sees that the highlights are blown out again. In editing, I was unable to bring up the shadows very much without exposing lots of noise. As expected, the Nikons both did really well with the shadows, highlights, and noise, partly because I could control the actual shutter speed, and partly because I could select a low ISO (lower ISO yields less noisy images). The iPhone’s Camera app doesn’t allow me to adjust those parameters. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • An 84 percent waxing moon and the lights of Eureka’s Woodley Island Marina provided enough light for the iPhone 12 Pro’s Night mode to make a good image. In fact, it looks great at first glance. But zooming in (see the Details), one sees that the highlights are blown out again. In editing, I was unable to bring up the shadows very much without exposing lots of noise. As expected, the Nikons both did really well with the shadows, highlights, and noise, partly because I could control the actual shutter speed, and partly because I could select a low ISO (lower ISO yields less noisy images). The iPhone’s Camera app doesn’t allow me to adjust those parameters.

Night mode falls utterly flat for my purposes when photographing landscapes, even under an 84 percent waxing gibbous moon. It leaves most of the shadows dreadfully  underexposed and full of noise. One can eliminate the noise in Adobe Lightroom, but it requires a very heavy setting that wipes out far too much detail, leaving the images looking unnaturally smooth, like plastic. Indeed, in other reviews I have seen online, the landscape photos have just that look. In my Trinidad Lighthouse image, I deliberately left most of the noise in to preserve more image detail. Editing is always a matter of personal taste.

What one considers “good enough” is both subjective and dependent on the intended use. I would not want to depend on the iPhone 12 Pro’s night mode to produce a nighttime image that I intended to print very large. There is simply too much noise when it is underexposed. Under ideal conditions, it can capture images that would make decent enlargements, but the real world often deals less than ideal conditions.

The iPhone 12 Pro whupped the pants off of my Nikons when it came to hand-holding it for long shutter speeds. Under a nearby streetlight and the 84% waxing gibbous moon, it performed admirably with me hand-holding the phone for both 5-second and 10-second exposures. I attribute this to a combination of the Night mode’s computational photography, in which it combines details from many exposures into the result, and to the built-in optical image stabilization of the iPhone’s camera. The Nikon, having no image stabilization nor any computational photography abilities, relied entirely on my steady hand, which was not at all steady for a 5-second exposure, let alone the 10 second one. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • The iPhone 12 Pro whupped the pants off of my Nikons when it came to hand-holding it for long shutter speeds. Under a nearby streetlight and the 84% waxing gibbous moon, it performed admirably with me hand-holding the phone for both 5-second and 10-second exposures. I attribute this to a combination of the Night mode’s computational photography, in which it combines details from many exposures into the result, and to the built-in optical image stabilization of the iPhone’s camera. The Nikon, having no image stabilization nor any computational photography abilities, relied entirely on my steady hand, which was not at all steady for a 5-second exposure, let alone the 10 second one.

Is night mode a “professional” feature? I will say this: if you’re a professional and you find yourself out at night with something to photograph, and all you have is your iPhone 12 Pro, then it’s professional. A professional photographer wants to create the best images possible, and if one didn’t have a DSLR or modern mirrorless camera handy, then night mode could get one by in many cases.

In brighter nighttime situations such as scenes with city lights, night mode does amazingly well — extremely well for a phone camera. And if you need to hand-hold your camera for a several-second exposure, night mode on the iPhone 12 Pro will produce an image with very little motion blur — while my Nikons yielded extremely blurry images in the same situation. That could very well save professionals who find themselves without their real camera or a tripod.

But for all other low light occasions, if you also have your DSLR, a tripod, and the time, the DSLR will give you better results; the Nikons produced much larger, crisper, richer, and less noisy images. Except when it came to hand-holding the camera for multiple-second exposures, where the iPhone 12 Pro’s night mode did a phenomenally better job, there was really no contest.

The relative sizes of the images produced by the three cameras in this comparison have a bearing on how much the images can be enlarged as prints. Generally, higher resolution images produce better large prints — but size is not everything; even with a large enough image, if it is blurry or noisy it will produce a low quality enlargement. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • The relative sizes of the images produced by the three cameras in this comparison have a bearing on how much the images can be enlarged as prints. Generally, higher resolution images produce better large prints — but size is not everything; even with a large enough image, if it is blurry or noisy it will produce a low quality enlargement.

Notes: All images for this review were shot in RAW format (except for the iPhone angel photos; those were shot in Apple’s regular .HEIC format (I forgot to change it to RAW). Because editing is important to my process, all images have been edited with the attempt to show them at their best — just as I would for any other purpose — with particular attention to maintaining detail in highlights and shadows.

Untested: Night mode also works with the front-facing camera for selfies; it works in Portrait mode; and it works with the iPhone’s time-lapse video features.

* “DSLR” is short for “digital single lens reflex”; you may recall that 35mm cameras were SLRs (with the exception of point and shoot cameras). I used DSLRs in this comparison because that is what I have, but having seen many results from modern mirrorless cameras, I am sure most current models would produce results similar to my DSLRs; the differences between the mirrorless cameras and my cameras would be minor compared to the difference between my cameras and the iPhone 12 Pro’s night mode.

To keep abreast of David Wilson’s most current photography or purchase a print, visit or contact him at his website mindscapefx.com or follow him on Instagram at @david_wilson_mfx and on Twitter @davidwilson_mfx . David teaches Art 35 Digital Photography at College of the Redwoods.

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Friday, May 28, 2021

Jury Classifies Scott Eden a Sexually Violent Predator

Posted By on Fri, May 28, 2021 at 5:51 PM

Today a Humboldt County jury classified Scott Dean Eden, who spent time in and out of prison for two different sexually motivated crimes, as a sexually violent predator under the Sexually Violent Predator Act.

According to the Humboldt County District Attorney's press release, in 1990 Eden was found guilty of abducting a woman from a Eureka grocery store with the intent to commit rape and he served a five-year prison sentence. Then in 2003, Eden was convicted of two counts of spousal rape and one count of forcible sexual penetration with a foreign object, for which he served a 16-year prison sentence.

District Attorney Maggie Flemming filed a petition to classify Eden as a sexually violent predator under the SVP Act, after which a jury determines if the allegation is true.

Now that Eden has been classified as a sexually violent predator, he will be committed to the California State Department of State Hospitals for appropriate treatment and confinement in a secure facility until a judge concludes he no longer fits the sexually violent predator criteria.

Read the full press release below:


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Blue-green Algae Makes an Early Appearance

Posted By on Fri, May 28, 2021 at 4:32 PM

The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe’s Environmental Scientist Jacob Pounds samples the algae mats for analysis. - BLUE LAKE RANCHERIA
  • Blue Lake Rancheria
  • The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe’s Environmental Scientist Jacob Pounds samples the algae mats for analysis.
Anyone visiting lakes or rivers in the region is being cautioned to look out for blue-green algae after the Blue Lake Rancheria confirmed levels of cyanobacteria at two sample sites on the Mad River this week.

The samples were collected at a popular swimming location known as Pump Station 4 and downstream of the city of Blue Lake's sewer ponds.

“Cyanobacteria can be present in any fresh water body, and looks like dark green, blue-green, black, orange or brown scum, foam or mats on the riverbed or floating on the water,” a news release from the Department of Health and Human Services states. “Cyanobacteria can produce harmful compounds, such as toxins and taste and odor compounds, that cause health risks to humans and animals.”

The positive tests point to an early arrival of the blue-green algae that usual appears between late July and early August, which is considered to be due to drought conditions.

"Low levels of toxins have been detected in algae mat samples from the Mad River, collected by the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe's Environmental Department at two locations where potential algae blooms had been observed," a release from the Rancheria states. "The presence of these toxins, even at low levels, triggers a 'CAUTION' posting by Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services for these locations in preparation for the Memorial Day holiday weekend.   
"A caution level posting means that toxins are present, but currently in low concentrations. Users of the Mad River are advised to avoid all visible algal blooms and scum, especially the mats at the margin of the river. It is advised to keep pets out of the water at these sites."

Sampling done by the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board at Big Lagoon and Stone Lagoon found no signs of blue-green algae or toxins

Dogs and small children are the most likely to be affected by the algae, according to DHHS, which offered the following tips:

  • Keep children, pets and livestock from swimming in or drinking water containing algal scums or mats.
  • Adults should also avoid wading and swimming in water containing algal blooms. Try not to swallow or inhale water spray in an algal bloom area.
  • If no algal scums or mats are visible, you should still carefully watch young children and warn them not to swallow any water.
  • Fish should be consumed only after removing the guts and liver and rinsing fillets in tap water.
  • Never drink, cook with or wash dishes with water from rivers, streams or lakes.
  • Get medical attention immediately if you think that you, your pet or livestock might have been poisoned by cyanobacteria toxins. Be sure to tell the doctor or veterinarian about possible contact with cyanobacteria or algal blooms.
  • Join or support one of the many watershed and river organizations.

To learn more about cyanobacteria and harmful algal blooms, visit the state of California’s website at www.mywaterquality.ca.gov/habs/index.html.

To report a bloom, e-mail CyanoHAB.Reports@waterboards.ca.gov or call 844-729-6466 (toll free). Blooms can also be reported via the “bloomWatch” app, which is available for free download on iTunes or Google play.

For information on conditions occurring within Humboldt County, contact the Division of Environmental Health at 707-445-6215 or 800-963-9241. Photos of suspected blooms can also be emailed to envhealth@co.humboldt.ca.us.

Read the DHHS release below:

Public Health officials are reminding residents to keep an eye out for cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, while recreating at local rivers and lakes after samples with the toxin were collected at two locations on the Mad River.

The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe confirmed Thursday that its Environmental Department collected the samples with cyanobacteria at a popular recreational location known as Pump Station 4 and just west of the Blue Lake Rancheria past the sewer ponds. The North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board sampled Big Lagoon and Stone Lagoon where no cyanobacteria or toxins were detected, and no other locations have been sampled to date.

Typically, cyanobacteria warnings come out between late July and early August, coinciding with low flows and sustained high temperatures in the inland areas which may contribute to cyanobacteria growth in the river. However, this year’s low level of rainfall and low river levels appears to be leading to an early season and increase in algal blooms in some locations.

Cyanobacteria can be present in any fresh water body, and looks like dark green, blue-green, black, orange or brown scum, foam or mats on the riverbed or floating on the water. Cyanobacteria can produce harmful compounds, such as toxins and taste and odor compounds, that cause health risks to humans and animals. Warm water and abundant nutrients can cause cyanobacteria to grow more rapidly than usual causing “blooms.” These blooms are termed “harmful algal blooms.”

In previous years, cyanobacteria was confirmed in some water bodies within Humboldt and surrounding counties, including the Mad River, South Fork Eel River, Van Duzen River, Trinity River, Big Lagoon, Stone Lagoon, Clear Lake and Lake Pillsbury. It is difficult to test and monitor the many lakes and miles of our local rivers. Most blooms in California contain harmless green algae, but it is important to stay safe and avoid contact.

While most cyanobacteria do not affect animals or people, some are capable of producing toxins that can be harmful to animals and humans. Dogs and children are most likely to be affected because of their smaller body size and tendency to stay in the water for longer periods of time.

Officials recommend the following guidelines for recreational users of freshwater areas:

Keep children, pets and livestock from swimming in or drinking water containing algal scums or mats.

Adults should also avoid wading and swimming in water containing algal blooms. Try not to swallow or inhale water spray in an algal bloom area.

If no algal scums or mats are visible, you should still carefully watch young children and warn them not to swallow any water.

Fish should be consumed only after removing the guts and liver and rinsing fillets in tap water.

Never drink, cook with or wash dishes with water from rivers, streams or lakes.

Get medical attention immediately if you think that you, your pet or livestock might have been poisoned by cyanobacteria toxins. Be sure to tell the doctor or veterinarian about possible contact with cyanobacteria or algal blooms.

Join or support one of the many watershed and river organizations.

To learn more about cyanobacteria and harmful algal blooms, visit the state of California’s website at www.mywaterquality.ca.gov/habs/index.html.

To learn more about cyanobacteria and algae on the South Fork Eel River, visit www.eelriverrecovery.org/algae.

To report a bloom, e-mail CyanoHAB.Reports@waterboards.ca.gov or call 844-729-6466 (toll free). Blooms can also be reported via the “bloomWatch” app which is available for free download on iTunes or Google play.

For information on conditions occurring within Humboldt County, contact the Division of Environmental Health at 707-445-6215 or 800-963-9241. Photos of suspected blooms can also be emailed to envhealth@co.humboldt.ca.us.

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EPD Captain On Leave Amid Investigation

Posted By on Fri, May 28, 2021 at 3:12 PM

Patrick O'Neill - CITY OF EUREKA
  • City of Eureka
  • Patrick O'Neill
One of the Eureka Police Department’s two captains has been placed on paid administrative leave.

EPD Chief Steve Watson confirmed to the Journal that Capt. Patrick O’Neill is on leave, but declined to discuss why or in relation to what matter, saying he’s legally prohibited from doing so.

“The penal code and evidence code prohibit the city form publicly discussing any police officer’s performance or discipline,” Watson told the Journal. “Therefore, it is the city’s policy not to comment regarding ongoing investigations or identify officers who may be subject to disciplinary investigations.”

It’s unclear if the matters are connected, but O’Neill’s leave comes amid an internal affairs investigation conducted by a Bay Area law firm looking into inappropriate text messages sent between officers in a unit led by Sgt. Rodrigo Reyna-Sanchez, as first reported by the Sacramento Bee. The texts sent by Reyna-Sanchez and officer Mark Meftah included misogynistic, violent and vulgar language, and dehumanizing references to homeless residents.

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Public Health Confirms Six New Cases, One New Hospitalization

Posted By on Fri, May 28, 2021 at 2:36 PM

Humboldt County Public Health Microbiologist Annayal Yikum prepares patient samples for the COVID-19 testing process. - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • Humboldt County Public Health Microbiologist Annayal Yikum prepares patient samples for the COVID-19 testing process.
Humboldt County Public Health confirmed six new COVID-19 cases after laboratories processed just 24 samples with a test-positivity rate of 25 percent, bringing the week's case tally to 89. One new hospitalization was also reported.

Last week, the county confirmed 127 new cases and eight new hospitalizations.

The county announced Wednesday that it is hosting vaccine clinics today and June 2 at College of the Redwoods from 2 to 6 p.m., and another at Eureka High School from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 5. (Get more info on them in the press release copied below.) Yesterday, state officials announced vaccinated residents will be eligible to receive millions of dollars in prizes, including 10 payouts of $1.5 million each, in a drawing June 15.

The county also reported Tuesday that Humboldt remains in the state's orange "widespread" COVID-19 risk tier, despite rising numbers that land Humboldt County's case and test-positivity rates as the worst of California's 58 counties.

Officials are pointing to the local presence of the B.1.1.7 variant as a reason for the recent spike in cases, with Public Health reporting last week that genomic sequencing has identified more than 40 local cases of the variant, which is associated with a 50 percent increase in transmission and more severe illness.

According to a state database, eight people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 locally, including two receiving intensive care.

The county reported Friday that state officials believe California is on track to move beyond its current blueprint for COVID-19 restrictions June 15, after which almost all business sectors can resume usual operations with limited exceptions, mostly for large events with 5,000 attendees or more. But the reopening will add risk for non-vaccinated individuals, and the state is urging residents to get vaccinated as soon as possible.

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Hot Holiday Weekend in the Forecast

Posted By on Fri, May 28, 2021 at 12:27 PM

heat_forecast.png
Things are going to be heating up this holiday weekend, with inland temperatures forecast to hit the 90s to low 100s in inland areas, including Willow Creek, Hoopa and Orleans, starting Sunday and running through mid-week.

“The threat for heat related illness will be elevated Sunday through Wednesday for vulnerable people such as the elderly, young children, and those working and recreating for a prolonged amount of time outdoors,” a notice from the Eureka office of the National Weather Service states.

Coastal areas will be in the 60s to 70s.

While higher temperatures may make a trip to the river tempting, the NWS cautions that waters are still running swift and cold this time of year.
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A 'Way of Life at Risk': A Yurok Tribal Member's Congressional Testimony

Posted By on Fri, May 28, 2021 at 8:02 AM

Amy Cordalis - COURTESY OF THE YUROK TRIBE
  • Courtesy of the Yurok Tribe
  • Amy Cordalis
The catastrophic drought that is striking the West seems to have gotten the attention of Congress.

On May 25, North Coast Rep. Jared Huffman chaired a virtual bipartisan hearing on the status of drought conditions in an area that extends from the Rio Grande to the Pacific Northwest. Huffman is no stranger to environmental issues, being a member of several congressional committees and subcommittees that supervise federal water projects, fisheries management, coastal zone and oceans policy, and wildlife and endangered species.

The hearing of the Water, Oceans and Wildlife Subcommittee Huffman chairs, consisted of nine expert witnesses, who each gave five minutes of testimony. It was followed by two hours of discussion and questions from members of Congress, some thoughtful and some critical, and occasionally reminding the viewer of an overcrowded lifeboat.

One of the expert witnesses was Amy Cordalis, counsel for the drought-ravaged Yurok Tribe. Wearing a traditional Yurok woven cap, she described the effects of watching a river starting to disintegrate in front of her eyes.

“From time immemorial, the Yurok lifeway has centered around the Klamath River. Drought puts our natural resources and way of life at risk,” she said. “The Yurok Reservation is in one of the most remote areas in California. We are hundreds of miles away from state or federal offices. The tribal government responds to emergencies like drought. In the next few months, we anticipate hundreds of homes will be without drinking water because the streams will run dry.

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Thursday, May 27, 2021

Final Curtain Call for Dell'Arte's MFA Program

Posted By on Thu, May 27, 2021 at 4:11 PM

According to a press release sent out today, Dell'Arte International School of Physical Theatre is ending its MFA program, the final performances of which were for its Thesis Festival last week, reviewed here. The professional training program classes, however, will return in the fall. The statement lists financial issues and need to focus on "stated goals for the next few years," including a curriculum review, among reasons for the closure of the MFA program, which brought students from around the world to its classrooms and stages.
A performance by the first-year Dell'Arte Commedia students. - PHOTO BY MARK LARSON
  • Photo by Mark Larson
  • A performance by the first-year Dell'Arte Commedia students.

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Public Health Confirms 13 New COVID Cases

Posted By on Thu, May 27, 2021 at 3:28 PM

Humboldt County Public Health confirmed 13 new COVID-19 cases after laboratories processed 238 samples with a test-positivity rate of 5.5 percent, bringing this weeks tally to 83.

Last week, the county confirmed 127 new cases and eight new hospitalizations.

The county announced yesterday that it is hosting vaccine clinics today and June 2 at College of the Redwoods from 2 to 6 p.m., and another at Eureka High School from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 5. (Get more info on them in the press release copied below.) Earlier today, state officials announced vaccinated residents will be eligible to receive millions of dollars in prizes, including 10 payouts of $1.5 million each, in a drawing June 15.

The county also reported Tuesday that Humboldt remains in the state's orange "widespread" COVID-19 risk tier, despite rising numbers that land Humboldt County's case and test-positivity rates as the worst of California's 58 counties.

Officials are pointing to the local presence of the B.1.1.7 variant as a reason for the recent spike in cases, with Public Health reporting last week that genomic sequencing has identified more than 40 local cases of the variant, which is associated with a 50 percent increase in transmission and more severe illness.

According to a state database, eight people are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 locally, including two receiving intensive care.

The county reported Friday that state officials believe California is on track to move beyond its current blueprint for COVID-19 restrictions June 15, after which almost all business sectors can resume usual operations with limited exceptions, mostly for large events with 5,000 attendees or more. But the reopening will add risk for non-vaccinated individuals, and the state is urging residents to get vaccinated as soon as possible.

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