Friday, February 28, 2020

Humboldt County Resident Cleared of COVID-19 Virus

Posted By on Fri, Feb 28, 2020 at 4:40 PM

A testing kit. - CDC
  • CDC
  • A testing kit.

The Humboldt County patient who tested positive for COVID-19 no longer has symptoms of the virus and has been released from isolation, according to a press release from the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services.


The patient met all the conditions for clearance required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and had “undergone multiple tests that confirm infection is no longer present,” the release states.

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Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Stapp Sentenced to 11 Years in Fatal DUI Crash

Posted By on Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 4:09 PM

Humboldt County Superior Court Judge Lawrence Killoran sentenced a 25-year-old Fields Landing man to serve 11 years in prison today, months after he drunkenly crashed his truck into a Humboldt Hill house, killing Robert Beland, 64, who was sleeping in bed at the time.

Ryder Dale Stapp tried to flee the scene of the crash but was detained by bystanders until police arrived.

Stapp pleaded guilty to a charge of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated and hit and run resulting in death or serious bodily injury stemming from the June 28 crash. Six members of Beland's family and two friends addressed the court prior to sentencing, according to a press release from the Humboldt County District Attorney's Office.

See the full press release copied below:


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Test for Second Possible Coronavirus Case 'Indeterminate'

Posted By on Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 2:31 PM

A testing kit. - CDC
  • CDC
  • A testing kit.
A novel coronavirus test on a second person who was showing symptoms of the respiratory disease after returning from a trip to mainland China has come back “indeterminate,” according to the county Department of Health and Human Services.

“Regardless, we are managing the second individual exactly the same as the confirmed case as we have from the start,” Humboldt County Health Officer Dr. Teresa Frankovich said in a release.

The second individual and Humboldt County’s one confirmed case of coronavirus — or COVID-19 — are “doing well” and remain in isolation at home while being monitored by medical professionals from Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Branch Communicable Disease Surveillance and Control Unit.

Neither traveled through the Arcata-Eureka airport when they arrived back in late January. Both sets of results were “confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),” according to the county.

A CDC update today reported 53 coronavirus cases in the United States, most of which are travel related or due to person-to-person transmission by individuals in close contact — such as people living together — but states there is potential for a public health threat depending on what the virus does moving forward.

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Monday, February 24, 2020

Sheriff's Office IDs Man Killed in Southern Humboldt

Posted By on Mon, Feb 24, 2020 at 4:26 PM

sheriff.png
The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office has identified the man whose body was found on a property in the Ettersburg area on Feb. 18 as Southern Humboldt resident Jason Todd Garrett.

According to a release, the 33 year old died of a gunshot wound.

A suspect in Garrett’s shooting, Ryan Anthony Tanner, 32, was taken into custody after a daylong search on Feb. 17 that included a CHP helicopter and SWAT team members.

The sheriff’s office had responded to Tanner’s property after it “received information regarding a possible homicide” at a property on Crooked Prairie Road.

“This case is still under investigation,” a release states. “Further information will be released when available and appropriate.”

Read the full HCSO release below:


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North Coast Night Lights: Comet Hyakutake

Posted By on Mon, Feb 24, 2020 at 2:07 PM

DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
Gradually, particle by particle, it grew in size. Through the eons its body filled out, increasing mass infinitesimally with each random mote and flake that settled onto its surface.

In its youth it had prowled the blackness of space on the shadowy fringes of a huge vortex. With others of its kind, it had drifted lazily at a safe distance from the swirling chaos of the maelstrom, observing aloofly the orbits and eddies of ices, metals, rocks and gases in their mad circuits about the new, bright little star at the center.

Masses moving in the unceasing night caressed it with soft tendrils of gravity, tugging and pulling at it gently, continually altering its wanderings until at last it was coaxed into a lazy path downward toward the star at the center of the busy swirl. Eventually, the sun’s own gravitational influence embraced it tenderly and drew it in.

Perhaps never again would it know the relative peace of its birthplace. It had begun a new orbit, a new cycle that would plunge it inward through the busy minefield of giant planets and debris, toward the sun, around it, and back outward again. Over and over again it would repeat this cyclical, 17,000-year-long trek down to the star and back out. During this endless journey, it would be subjected not only to the tortures of the sun’s searing radiation at its closest approach, but to the immense gravitational pulls of the moving planets and the star about which they orbited. Its path would be influenced by the gravity of every body it passed.
Comet Hyakutake glowing with its distinctive greenish hue, as photographed from Fickle Hill Road above Arcata, California. Shot on Ektar 1000 color negative film, this is an in-camera double-exposure: first I photographed Comet Hyakutake. Then, on the same piece of film, I took another photo of my friend’s face in the dark, painting blue light only onto his profile with a tiny flashlight. Can you see his profile looking down toward the left? That is no “Horseshoe Nebula;” it’s his nostril! Above his nostril is the ridge of his eyebrow, and below the nostril are his lips, and at the bottom, his chin. Or maybe you had to be there. Anyway, it was all very cosmic. Humboldt County, California. March, 1996. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • Comet Hyakutake glowing with its distinctive greenish hue, as photographed from Fickle Hill Road above Arcata, California. Shot on Ektar 1000 color negative film, this is an in-camera double-exposure: first I photographed Comet Hyakutake. Then, on the same piece of film, I took another photo of my friend’s face in the dark, painting blue light only onto his profile with a tiny flashlight. Can you see his profile looking down toward the left? That is no “Horseshoe Nebula;” it’s his nostril! Above his nostril is the ridge of his eyebrow, and below the nostril are his lips, and at the bottom, his chin. Or maybe you had to be there. Anyway, it was all very cosmic. Humboldt County, California. March, 1996.
Now the comet plunged toward the sun again, the star’s radiation bombarding its crust and boiling away the softer areas across its revolving surface. Pockets of volatile gases burst forth continually under the bombardment, sending streamers and jets outward until the comet’s nucleus was immersed in a fuzzy cloud of its own sloughed materials. Its course was altered ever so slightly with each jet erupting from its surface, with each chunk blasted free. Its long tail took shape as it swung down closer to the sun, the solar wind pushing dust and gas particles away from it and outward from the sun in a long glowing trail.

It passed close to the third planet, closer than it ever had before. It was no stranger to this part of the neighborhood, for the comet had passed that big blue marble many times since it was first dislodged from its old home outside the solar system. The last time it had swung by Earth some 17,000 years before, humanity had comprised a scant few millions of souls. The peopling of the Americas had only recently begun with early migrations from Asia. People had set down their stone tools and gazed in wonder with their naked eyes, or perhaps hid in fear.
This Hyakutake fan art I made from my photo of the comet combined with other photographs of various places and objects I found on California’s North Coast. While I shot the original comet on 35mm film, I photographed the rest of the parts digitally some years later. Created September, 2008. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • This Hyakutake fan art I made from my photo of the comet combined with other photographs of various places and objects I found on California’s North Coast. While I shot the original comet on 35mm film, I photographed the rest of the parts digitally some years later. Created September, 2008.
Now, as Comet Hyakutake approached our planet again, Earth’s billions of inhabitants trained on it the latest technological instruments and lenses that the science of the late 20th century had to offer. Yet, advanced as we thought ourselves to be, this spectacular comet had come out of nowhere. We had failed to even notice it until it was fewer than three months from its peak visibility; it was discovered in January of 1996, and peaked by late March. And none of us will ever see that comet again.

I’m ready for another good comet.

Note: I’m not a scientist, and where informed scientific theory failed me — or rather where I failed science — I substituted with good old-fashioned creative license. We can call it science fiction. I hope you enjoyed the ride.

To keep abreast of David Wilson’s most current photography or peer into its past, visit or contact him at his website mindscapefx.com or follow him on Instagram at @david_wilson_mfx .
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Caution Urged After Mountain Lion Spotted at CR

Posted By on Mon, Feb 24, 2020 at 10:59 AM

College of the Redwoods is alerting staff and students about a mountain lion sighting. - CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE/FILE
  • California Department of Fish and Wildlife/File
  • College of the Redwoods is alerting staff and students about a mountain lion sighting.
College of the Redwoods is cautioning students and staff to “take care” near the Creative Arts Building and Botanical Gardens after a “large mountain lion” was spotted around 9:10 a.m. today, according to a Facebook post.

In an alert sent out, those on campus were asked to be “observant and cautious while in the area” and to report any further sightings to the CR Police Department at (707) 476-4111.

The school also provided a link to the California Department Fish and Wildlife website about mountain lions and living in the animal’s territory, which notes that attacks on humans are rare. 
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Friday, February 21, 2020

NCJ Preview with Access Humboldt

Posted By on Fri, Feb 21, 2020 at 5:55 PM

This week: Is Arcata ready to pay more taxes to keep the firefighters and stations it has, or make tough cuts to keep the costs down? It's on the March 3 ballot and we'll talk about emergency response and costs. Plus, Jesse Wiedel's gritty Heroin Hilton street art installation on an infamous Eureka building and how it vanished.
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Coronavirus Case Treated at St. Joe's on Sunday

Posted By on Fri, Feb 21, 2020 at 3:36 PM

A testing kit. - CDC
  • CDC
  • A testing kit.
St. Joseph Hospital treated the two individuals who were showing symptoms of a viral illness after traveling to mainland China — one of whom is Humboldt County’s first confirmed case of COVID-19, otherwise known as novel coronavirus.

According to the hospital, the patients were evaluated at St. Joseph’s emergency room on Feb. 16. Read the full press release below.

“After a thorough investigation, at this time, we have no evidence that any patients were exposed during the visit,” the release states. “There was no close or prolonged contact with anyone in the Emergency Department. We followed established protocols from the moment the patients arrived.”

That included being directed immediately to an isolation room that has negative pressure, controlling airflow to prevent the virus from spreading, according to the release. Both were treated and released the same day.

The county’s Department of Health and Human Services confirmed the region’s first coronavirus case yesterday. A second person has been tested after showing symptoms but the results are pending.

In the meantime, both individuals are under home quarantine, according to Humboldt County Health Officer Dr. Teresa Frankovich, who says the risk to the general public is low.

She says the second test results are expected sometime next week.


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Thursday, February 20, 2020

Coronavirus Case Confirmed in Humboldt

Posted By on Thu, Feb 20, 2020 at 4:16 PM

A testing kit. - CDC
  • CDC
  • A testing kit.
According to a DHHS press release, Humboldt County has its first confirmed case of COVID-19, more commonly referred to as coronavirus.

“It’s important to remember that the risk to the general public remains low at this time,” said Humboldt County Health Officer Dr. Teresa Frankovich. “Despite the fact that Humboldt County now has a confirmed case of COVID-19, there is no evidence to suggest that novel coronavirus is circulating in the community at large.”

The individual is a Humboldt County resident and a “close contact” is also being tested.

“Close contacts of these individuals will also be quarantined at home and monitored for symptoms by Public Health staff,” the release states. “With the amount of foreign travel by county residents, including travel to China, it is not surprising that a case has emerged locally. Additional cases may occur either in returning travelers or their close contacts. “

Read the full DHHS release below:
The Humboldt County Department of Health & Human Services Public Health Branch has received confirmation from the California Department of Public Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of one case of COVID-19 in a Humboldt County resident. A close contact who has symptoms is being tested as well.

This marks the first confirmed case of the novel coronavirus in Humboldt County. Presently, the ill individuals are doing well and self-isolating at home, while being monitored for symptoms by the Public Health Communicable Disease Surveillance and Control Unit.

Close contacts of these individuals will also be quarantined at home and monitored for symptoms by Public Health staff. With the amount of foreign travel by county residents, including travel to China, it is not surprising that a case has emerged locally. Additional cases may occur either in returning travelers or their close contacts.

“It’s important to remember that the risk to the general public remains low at this time,” said Humboldt County Health Officer Dr. Teresa Frankovich. “Despite the fact that Humboldt County now has a confirmed case of COVID-19, there is no evidence to suggest that novel coronavirus is circulating in the community at large.”

Frankovich added that transmission in the U.S. to date has been among close contacts and not among the general public.

Public Health suggests the following precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and all infectious diseases, including common illnesses like colds and flu:
• Stay home when you are sick
• If you have a fever, stay home or go home if you are already at work or school, and stay home for at least 24 hours after you no longer have a fever (without the use of fever-reducing medicine).
• Wash your hands frequently and particularly before eating or drinking.
• Promote good hand hygiene in your home by educating household members and making sure soap, hand sanitizers, and tissues are available.
• Avoid touching your face, particularly your eyes, nose and mouth.
• Encourage proper cough etiquette. Cough or sneeze into a tissue, sleeve or arm. Do not use your hands.
• Perform routine surface cleaning, particularly for items which are frequently touched such as doorknobs, handles, remotes, keyboards and other commonly shared surfaces.

The county’s Communicable Disease Surveillance and Control Unit will continue to provide updated information about COVID-19 to health care providers, hospitals and schools, as well as the general public.

For updated information about COVID-19, please continue to check the CDC website here.

If you are ill and in need of medical care and have been in China within the previous two weeks or have been in contact with an individual who has COVID-19, please contact your health care provider or emergency department before presenting for care.

Arrangements will be made to have you evaluated in the safest manner possible for health care staff and other patients.

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Lawson Report: Lack of Training, Crime Scene Management Hindered Investigation

Posted By on Thu, Feb 20, 2020 at 3:30 PM

David Josiah Lawson - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • David Josiah Lawson
A long-delayed National Police Foundation report released today commended the initial officers’ response to the fatal stabbing of Humboldt State University student David “Josiah” Lawson nearly three years ago but found a systemic failure by the police department’s then leadership to provide adequate training on crime scene management and command skills, which severely hindered the ensuing investigation.

The 65-page review’s executive summary states that the NPF’s assessment team “found that APD officers responded quickly and professionally to a highly chaotic scene — an event that would have been challenging for any agency of any size and sophistication. APD first responders focused their attention on providing lifesaving measures at the highly-charged scene.”

But it found the city “had not provided the appropriate level of organizational leadership, planning, and training to respond to, and investigate, this type of a complicated and chaotic homicide scene.”

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