Thursday, October 24, 2019

Update: Whale Euthanized

Posted By on Thu, Oct 24, 2019 at 12:48 PM

A humpback whale that was found beached just north of Samoa, California on Wednesday struggles in the surf. The whale had become tangled in fishing nets and a crab pot. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • A humpback whale that was found beached just north of Samoa, California on Wednesday struggles in the surf. The whale had become tangled in fishing nets and a crab pot.

Oct. 25 UPDATE:

At around 6 p.m. last night, a veterinarian with the Marine Mammal Center euthanized the whale that was stranded on the north side of Samoa beach Wednesday morning. The decision to euthanize the mammal came after the Sausalito veterinarian conducted physical examinations and blood tests to determine its health. (After the whale's death the teams were able to confirm it was female.)

Now, the teams are conducting a necropsy and external examination of the whale to try to find out more about what happened, said Dawn Goley, Humboldt State University professor and HSU Marine Mammal Stranding Program coordinator. Once they are done with the examinations, the teams will bury the whale on the beach.

“We’re really sorry it ended this way,” Goley said. “But this was the most humane way to go.”


UPDATE:

A specialist from the Marine Mammal Center in
Sausalito has determined that the whale beached just north of Samoa will not
survive or return to the water after assessing its condition and taking blood
tests, Humboldt State University professor and HSU Marine Mammal Stranding
Program Coordinator Dawn Goley said.

“We’re sorry for the outcome but right now we’re just planning for the next steps,” she said.

PREVIOUSLY:

The humpback whale that was found entangled in fishing nets on Samoa beach yesterday has now spent more than 24 hours out of water, which may greatly impact its health and survival according to Dawn Goley, a Humboldt State University marine biology professor who also works with the HSU Marine Mammal Stranding Network.


“It’s not good for a whale to be out of water, ever,” Goley said. “Land and gravity takes its toll. The force of the pull of [the whale’s] weight affects its organs. It’s very unlikely that this whale is going to survive.”


Goley was one of the first responders at the scene, coordinating with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Marine Fisheries Services. The MMSP team had first assessed the conditions of the whale and the entanglement of the net before contacting the NOAA to make a plan on how to disentangle it.


After about an hour, using specialized equipment the teams made careful cuts and were able to disentangle the whale from the net, they then began assessing its respiration and behavior to enact the best plan to return the whale to the ocean.

As of 10 a.m. this morning, the whale was alive and moving its fins. Goley said that if the whale isn’t able to swim away on it’s own they will not make any attempt to push the whale into the ocean, as it is dangerous for both the whale and people. Other ideas, like building trenches, also have profound risks, she added, saying that the waves on the North Coast play a role in the danger, calling them “treacherous.”

Helmet Allison Lui with HSU Marine Mammal Stranding Network throws sea water on a humpback whale that was found beached just north of Samoa, California on Wednesday. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • Helmet Allison Lui with HSU Marine Mammal Stranding Network throws sea water on a humpback whale that was found beached just north of Samoa, California on Wednesday.

“We’ve been in communication with NOAA and other organizations around the country who have had experiences with stranded whales to weigh out every option,” Goley said. “It might seem like we are not doing much, but we’re thinking of what’s best and safest for the whale and people.”

Goley said that they do not know what other factors played a role on the whale coming onto the shore. Besides the fishing net, they do not know what the whale’s conditions were when it first caught on the net. Goley said she’d like to thank the community for its support and suggestions, they are taking this situation one step at a time.


“We’re expecting the worst, but hoping for the best,” Goley said.



  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Fortuna Police: Evidence Indicates Students had the 'Means' to Carry Out Attack

Posted By on Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 2:30 PM

The two male Fortuna High School students arrested yesterday afternoon for allegedly plotting to harm fellow students may have had the means to carry out the attack, Fortuna Police Chief Bill Dobberstein told the Journal after a press conference this morning.

“There is some evidence that they did have the means,” Dobberstein said, adding the extent of those means is still under investigation.

The police chief declined to answer whether that meant access to firearms or other weapons, but said evidence collected last night at the suspects’ homes, one in Rio Dell and one in Fortuna, indicated the students may have had what they needed to follow through with their plot. Dobberstein also said at this point there are no additional suspects in the case and he doesn’t believe there is any ongoing threat to the public.
Fortuna Union High School District Superintendent Glen Senestraro spoke to parents about how they were notified of the incident and the short notice between the announcement and the press conference. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • Fortuna Union High School District Superintendent Glen Senestraro spoke to parents about how they were notified of the incident and the short notice between the announcement and the press conference.
At a joint press conference, Dobberstein and Fortuna Union High School District Superintendent Glen Senestraro stressed that they are limited in what they can release to the public at this point, noting the suspects are juveniles and have certain confidentiality protections and that they don’t want to jeopardize the ongoing investigation.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Alleged Plot to 'Harm' Students Thwarted at Fortuna High School

Posted By on Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 11:05 AM

FUHSD
  • FUHSD
Two minors are being held at Juvenile Hall after Fortuna police and Fortuna High School thwarted what they believe was a plot to “harm other students,” according to a joint press release.

According to the release, the high school received information of the possible plot yesterday afternoon. The two students were quickly detained, with “information found on their persons indicating the validity to the original report.” The students were taken into custody and search warrants were served at both their homes, according to the release.

Details are minimal at this point but the school and police department plan to hold a joint press conference at noon today. Police ask anyone with information pertinent to the investigation to call 725-7550.

See the full press release copied below:

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Monday, October 21, 2019

Endangered Sea Turtle Recovering After Washing Up in Humboldt

Posted By on Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 5:54 PM

An endangered Olive Ridley sea turtle is recovering at a Sausalito veterinary hospital after washing ashore at Bunkers Beach in Humboldt County, hundreds of miles north of its home.

Marine Mammal Center spokesperson Giancarlo Rulli tells the Journal that Donatello, as the adult female turtle has been dubbed, is currently receiving supportive care, which includes electrolyte fluids to help with hydration and heat support for hypothermia. She “showed positive signs” in a rehabilitative swim session today but, Rulli warns, the “long-term prognosis is still guarded.”
While Olive Ridley sea turtles typically weigh around 40 pounds, Donatello was emaciated when found, weighing in at an estimated 25 pounds. - ISHAN VERNALLIS
  • Ishan Vernallis
  • While Olive Ridley sea turtles typically weigh around 40 pounds, Donatello was emaciated when found, weighing in at an estimated 25 pounds.
The turtle was spotted by a beachgoer in the surf off Bunkers Beach, north of the North Jetty on Saturday. The beachgoer then called the Humboldt Wildlife Care Center and the Marine Mammal Center’s stranded animal hotline. Monte Merrick, the Wildlife Care Center’s director, said he was first to arrive on scene and was surprised to see the turtle, noting he’s never seen one on the North Coast, as they need tropical or subtropical water. The turtles generally keep to regions like Baja California, the Persian Gulf and the Carribean Islands. Consequently, Merrick said he struggled to identify exactly what he was looking at.

“It was obviously a sea turtle, that part I knew,” he said. “I have seen Finding Nemo.”

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Duluwat Island is Returned to the Wiyot Tribe in Historic Ceremony

Posted By on Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 2:40 PM

With five words, it became official — Duluwat Island is being returned to the Wiyot people, for whom it is the physical and cultural center of the universe, a sacred piece of land with the power to bring balance to all else.

“Unanimous yes vote. Motion carries,” said Eureka City Clerk Pam Powell, drawing a standing ovation from the hundreds of people who had filled the Adorni Center this morning to watch the city take the unprecedented step of returning 200 acres of land stolen generations ago to the Wiyot Tribe, which has called the North Coast home since time immemorial.
Wiyot Tribal Chair Ted Hernandez joins in the ceremonial Brush Dance. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • Wiyot Tribal Chair Ted Hernandez joins in the ceremonial Brush Dance.
This morning’s vote, which was years in the making and captured international headlines, paved the way for, about 90 minutes later, Eureka Mayor Susan Seaman and Wiyot Tribal Chair Ted Hernandez signing a deed of trust, formally transferring ownership of the largest island in Humboldt Bay.

The emotional ceremony saw multiple generations of local residents gathered in the Adorni Center to witness the historic vote, many wiping tears from their eyes.

“We knew that this day would come,” said Cutcha Risling Baldy, who chairs Humboldt State University’s Native American Studies Department and is of Hupa, Yurok and Karuk descent, adding that while Duluwat Island is perhaps most widely known for its worst day — Feb. 26, 1860, when a group of white men descended on the island while the Wiyot Tribe was in the midst of its World Renewal Ceremony and murdered as many as 250 people, mostly women, children and elders, under a cloak of darkness — she always saw the island as symbolic of so much more. “It wasn’t about what had happened there but what would happen there.”

Today marks the culmination of decades of work for the tribe, which first approached Eureka about repatriating the island in 1970. In 2000, through a series of fundraising events that ranged from Indian taco sales to art auctions, the tribe raised more than $100,000 to purchase 1.5 acres of the island from the city, a parcel that included the sacred village site of Tuluwat. Four years later, the city gave the tribe another 40 acres of the island, which for decades was commonly known locally as "Indian Island."

In the ensuing years, the tribe secured various grants and oversaw a massive environmental cleanup of the island, scrubbing it of the toxic legacies left by a lumber mill and boat repair facility that operated there for decades. The current effort to see the city of Eureka return the other roughly 202 acres of the island it owned gained a foothold in early 2014, when then Mayor Frank Jager — the grandfather of two Wiyot girls — attempted to help heal old wounds by drafting a letter of apology to the tribe on behalf of the city.

This is the letter former Mayor Frank Jager wrote to the Wiyot Tribe.
  • This is the letter former Mayor Frank Jager wrote to the Wiyot Tribe.
"In February 1860, 154 years ago, citizens from Eureka participated in what has been described as a massacre of unfathomable proportions," the letter began, going on to describe the attack on "that winter night long ago," when women and children were slaughtered. "As Mayor of Eureka, and on behalf of the city council and the people of Eureka, we would like to offer a formal apology to the Wiyot people for the actions of our people in 1860. Nothing we say or do can make up for what occurred on that night of infamy. It will forever be a scar on our history. We can, however, with our present and future actions of support for the Wiyot work to remove the prejudice and bigotry that still exist in our society today."

The letter was released to the public before undergoing a legal review by then City Attorney Cyndy Day-Wilson, who erroneously thought the letter could open the city up to potential financial liability and gutted the letter, removing any mention of who attacked the Wiyot people that day or anyone being sorry for it. (Multiple legal experts consulted by the Journal say Day-Wilson’s concerns were unfounded, as the brutal killings carried out by unknown people occurred 14 years before Eureka was officially incorporated as a city.)

But the letter — and Jager’s sentiments — opened the door to something bigger. A few months later, Natalie Arroyo and Kim Bergel won seats on the Eureka City Council and Duluwat Island and making amends with the Wiyot Tribe was at the forefront of their minds. Both asked the tribe what they could do as new council members to help the tribe and improve relations, and the tribe’s answer was consistent: “Give us back the island.”

After years of work behind the scenes, the council voted unanimously Dec. 4, 2018, to declare the island “surplus property” and directed City Manager Greg Sparks to negotiate its return to the tribe. It has taken a year — bogged down by issues with the State Lands Commission and the title company overseeing the transfer — but the island has now been returned to the tribe without condition.

Experts consulted by the Journal say the transfer is simply without precedent —  aside from the city’s turning over the 40 acres of the island back in 2004 but, they note, that came after the tribe purchased a piece of the property on the open market. Nonprofits and the federal government have returned land to Native people, but nobody consulted by the Journal could recall a local municipality repatriating hundreds of acres of land to a local tribe in the absence of a sale or lawsuit settlement.

“I think it’s a big deal,” said Bob Anderson, the director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington School of Law who for six years served in the Interior Department providing legal advice on issues of Indian law and sovereignty. “It sets an important precedent for other communities that might be thinking about doing this.”

Eureka City Councilmember Natalie Arroyo watches via FaceTime as City Manager Greg Sparks reads her letter commemorating the return of Duluwat Island. - THADEUS GREENSON
  • Thadeus Greenson
  • Eureka City Councilmember Natalie Arroyo watches via FaceTime as City Manager Greg Sparks reads her letter commemorating the return of Duluwat Island.
Councilmember Natalie Arroyo, who was unable to attend the ceremony since she's in Georgia serving on active duty orders with the U.S. Coast Guard, said in a letter read for her by Sparks that repatriating the island was simply the right thing to do.

“I will be so bold as to say that, while under current conditions Eureka owns the land on Tuluwat, it was truly never ours,” Arroyo wrote. “It is sacred, stolen land, and I firmly believe it is our moral obligation to return it. All pretty words aside, that is what the situation is in a nutshell.”

Baldy said she’s hopeful this is an idea that catches on, noting that when she speaks at various engagements she is often asked by well-meaning white people what they can do.

“I have one answer now: You need to give all the land back,” she said. “The least that anyone can do is return the land and now we know it’s possible. We’ve seen it. We’ve felt it.”

Wiyot tribal elder Cheryl Seidner has worked for the return of Duluwat Island for decades, carrying on the efforts of her parents. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • Wiyot tribal elder Cheryl Seidner has worked for the return of Duluwat Island for decades, carrying on the efforts of her parents.

In a powerful moment, Jager came to the stage this morning and read the unedited version of his apology but only after calling on his successors on the council to take one more step: to make Feb. 26 an official day of mourning in the city during which flags would fly at half staff in memory of the Wiyot people murdered in 1860.

Moments before signing the deed that would officially return the center of the Wiyot people’s universe to the tribe, Hernandez made clear that while today is a historic day, it’s not an ending but a continuation for the people who have been here for millennia. “We don’t stop here,” he said. “We move forward.”

Look for full coverage of the historic day in the print edition of this week’s Journal, which will be on newsstands Wednesday, and see past coverage here. And watch Seidner, surrounded by family, lead the room in song in the video below.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Humboldt Not Currently Included in PG&E Outage Warning

Posted By on Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 11:09 AM

No one wants to do this again. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • No one wants to do this again.
PG&E is warning of another round of Public Safety Power Shutoffs due to expected dry and windy conditions Wednesday and Thursday, but does not include Humboldt County on its list.

In a Facebook post, the Humboldt County Office of Emergency Services acknowledges the “healthy skepticism” local residents may have about the company’s announcement “since we were also not supposed to be impacted last time.”

That is, of course, referring to the Oct. 9 blackout that hit the entire county with little warning after PG&E realized late in the game that Humboldt was going to go dark. The action closed down many businesses, causing runs on food and gas, and left the region’s most vulnerable residents in a precarious situation — one that put lives at risk had the outage continued much longer.

“We will update as soon as any new information is available or if conditions change,” the OES post states.
PG&E’s release states any PSPS is “expected to be significantly smaller in terms of scope and impact” than the one that involved a huge swath of the state’s northern section.

“Portions of counties that may be impacted include, but are not limited to: Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, San Joaquin, Solano, Sonoma, Tehama, Yolo and Yuba,” according to the release.

The company says updates will be provided “several times a day.”

Read the full PG&E release below:


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Sunday, October 20, 2019

EPD Arrests Tennessee Man on Suspicion of Murder

Posted By on Sun, Oct 20, 2019 at 10:32 AM

Whited
  • Whited
Eureka police have arrested a 22-year-old Tennessee man on suspicion of the murder of Brett Keiling, who died after a Sept. 26 assault near the 400 block of Third Street.

Eureka detectives, working in conjunction with the city's Community Safety Enhancement Team, identified Connor Whited as a suspect in the case, obtained an arrest warrant and took him into custody Saturday without incident.

Whited is being held on $1 million bail after, according to EPD, the investigation determined the fatal assault was not a random act of violence and that Whited had targeted Keiling, 55, who had recently moved to the area from Indiana.

See the full press release from EPD copied below:


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Friday, October 18, 2019

Moonstone Grill Changes Hands

Posted By on Fri, Oct 18, 2019 at 4:33 PM

The iconic beachside restaurant Moonstone Grill, formerly owned by the same group that operates Plaza Grill and the Basement (formerly Abruzzi), is now a part of another cluster of establishments owned by the Tanski family, along with Gabriel's Italian Restaurant and the Wine Cellar.

According to Likhi Tanski, general manager at Gabriel's, “It’s kind of been in the works for a few months but the actual deal got done a couple of weeks ago.” The sale, in escrow now, was “set up through a mutual friend," he says, adding that it was mainly handled by his brother Ariel Tanski, who will take over as owner and chef. 
Window-side dining at Moonstone Grill. - PHOTO BY MARK MCKENNA
  • Photo by Mark McKenna
  • Window-side dining at Moonstone Grill.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

CalFresh Recipients Given Extra Time to Replace Food Lost to Blackout

Posted By on Fri, Oct 18, 2019 at 12:42 PM

The deadline for local CalFresh recipients who lost food during the Oct. 9 power outage to apply for replacement benefits has now been extended until Nov. 8, according to the California Heath and Human Services Agency.

Humboldt County residents can call (877) 410-8809 or go to the cou
Deadline extended for CalFresh recipients who lost food in the outage to apply for replacement benefits. - COURTESY OF THE NORTH COAST CO-OP
  • Courtesy of the North Coast Co-op
  • Deadline extended for CalFresh recipients who lost food in the outage to apply for replacement benefits.
nty Department of Health and Human Services office at 929 Koster St. in Eureka to start the process.

According to the CHHSA, recipients “will need to complete, sign and turn in a 'CF 303' form to request a replacement,” including contact information and a short description of how the food was lost and the time and date of the power outage.

For more information call (877) 847-3663 (FOOD) or visit CalFreshFood.org.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Author Chag Lowry to Talk About Yurok WWI Book at Multiple Events

Posted By on Thu, Oct 17, 2019 at 3:31 PM

https_images.saymedia-content.com_.image_mty2mje2otmzodiwmd.jpg
Formerly local author Chag Lowry, whose graphic novel Soldiers Unknown was the subject of the Journal’s Sept. 26 cover story, will be speaking at a couple local events this weekend.

Lowry, whose book tells the story of three young Yurok men drafted to serve in World War I, will be speaking at Humboldt State University at 1:30 p.m. Friday in room 162 the Behavioral and Social Sciences Building before a presentation and book signing at Northtown Books in Arcata at 7 p.m.

Then, on Saturday, Lowry will be speaking briefly at a screening of the film Wounded Knee to Standing Rock at 7 p.m. at the Eureka Theater.

For more about Lowry’s book and the inspiration behind it, see past Journal coverage here.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Recent Comments

Care2 Take Action?

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2022 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation