Monday, May 27, 2019

One Dead, One Hospitalized After Arcata Shooting

Posted By on Mon, May 27, 2019 at 9:45 AM

The scene of the shooting. - TONY WALLIN
  • Tony Wallin
  • The scene of the shooting.
One man is dead and another is hospitalized after a shooting near the intersection of Foster and Alliance in Arcata just before 10 p.m. Sunday.

The shooting reportedly occurred amid a marijuana sale-gone-wrong, when four Eureka men attempted to sell cannabis to a single buyer, Arcata Police Chief Brian Ahearn told Redwood News.

Ahearn said the buyer — a white male wearing a grey sweatsuit and a green camouflage jacket — pulled a handgun and opened fire, striking two of the sellers. The suspect then fled on foot and should be considered armed and dangerous, according to Ahearn.

As of 1 a.m. the suspect remained at large, Ahearn said.

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Sunday, May 26, 2019

Kinetic Race Rolls on For the Glory

Posted By on Sun, May 26, 2019 at 11:58 AM

The Lion Kings of Rock-n-Roll both rolled and rocked Dead Man’s Drop. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • The Lion Kings of Rock-n-Roll both rolled and rocked Dead Man’s Drop.
The Kinetic Grand Championship is in full swing, with racers braving blustery conditions to traverse sand, water and asphalt, all for the glory.

Local photographer Mark McKenna was on scene for yesterday's kickoff, from the revelry of the plaza and the dangers of Dead Man's Drop, all the way to Halvorsen Park, where the race's first leg came to a close. Check out his full slideshow below, and check back for more as the race continues its three-day trek toward Ferndale's Main Street.
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Saturday, May 25, 2019

Former Arcata Restaurant Owner Killed by New York Police

Posted By on Sat, May 25, 2019 at 9:23 AM

Luke Patterson - FACEBOOK
  • Facebook
  • Luke Patterson
Luke Patterson — the formerly local chef who opened Luke’s Joint and The Other Place in Arcata — was fatally shot by New York State Police around 2 a.m. Thursday while walking along Interstate 84 in the town of Montgomery, according to numerous news reports.

Patterson, 41, was unarmed but shot multiple times.

The New York Attorney General’s Office has announced it will investigate the shooting as a special prosecutor, as it does with all police killings of unarmed suspects in the state under an executive order signed by the governor in 2015.

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Friday, May 24, 2019

Remains Found on Beach in March Identified

Posted By on Fri, May 24, 2019 at 4:09 PM

sheriff.png
Remains found on a Big Lagoon State Park beach in March have been identified as those of a 46-year-old Alabama man, according to the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office.

While a sheriff’s office release states that the cause of Timothy Jason Moore’s death is unknown, “foul play is not suspected.”

Few other details, including why Moore was in Humboldt County, were released.

Read the HCSO release below:

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Indian Island Likely to Return to Wiyot Tribe Next Month

Posted By on Fri, May 24, 2019 at 3:45 PM

A view of Indian Island's Tuluwat site during a king tide. - FILE
  • File
  • A view of Indian Island's Tuluwat site during a king tide.

After an unexpected delay, the unprecedented repatriation of Indian Island to the Wiyot Tribe is poised to come before the Eureka City Council for final approval next month.

City Manager Greg Sparks said the return of the tribe’s sacred ancestral land — approved in principal by the council in principle Dec. 4 — was delayed due to an issue with the State Lands Commission, which is responsible for protecting natural and cultural resources, as well as public access rights on publicly owned land.

“We think we have resolved that,” Sparks said. “It seems like we’re just about there.”

Sparks said he is looking to get the matter back before the council next month, either on June 18 or at a special meeting.

The council voted unanimously Dec. 4 to declare more than 200 acres of city-owned land on the island “surplus property” and directed Sparks to negotiate its return to the Wiyot Tribe, for whom the island was home for at least 1,000 years, according to an archaeologist, and since time immemorial, according to the tribe. In Wiyot culture, the island — which is home to the sacred village Tuluwat, where the tribe held its annual World Renewal Ceremony — is the physical and cultural center of the universe.

The largest of three islands in Humboldt Bay, Indian Island is comprised mainly of tidelands and spans about 280 acres, stretching nearly a mile long and a half-mile wide. In late February of 1860, the island was the site of one of a series of coordinated attacks by white settlers on the Wiyot people, when militiamen invaded the island while the Wiyot men were away from the village gathering supplies and brutally massacred more than 60 unarmed women, children and elders.

The massacre came just weeks after Robert Gunther purchased the island from John T. Moore, who had legally seized the land from the tribe by submitting a claim with the federal government. The island then endured more than a century of environmental abuse. It was diked and drained to create grazing land, then became home to a number of lumber mills and a dry-dock boat repair shop, all of which left toxic legacies.
The Wiyot Tribe's acquisition of Indian Island - NORTH COAST JOURNAL/JONATHAN WEBSTER
  • North Coast Journal/Jonathan Webster
  • The Wiyot Tribe's acquisition of Indian Island
In 2000, after years of fundraising efforts, the Wiyot Tribe purchased a 1.5-acre parcel on the island that included Tuluwat from the city of Eureka for $106,000. Several years later, the city donated an additional 40 acres to the tribe, which secured a variety of grants to clean up the contamination left by the lumber mills and boat yard, and in 2014 tribal members gathered on Tuluwat to finish the World Renewal Ceremony that had been interrupted by the massacre.

The council’s decision in December to return the other 200 or so acres of city-owned land on the island free of charge is considered unprecedented, according to experts consulted by the Journal, all of whom said that while there are examples of the federal government, nonprofits and private landowners returning native land, they believed Eureka is the first local municipality to take such a step.

“I think it’s a big deal,” Bob Anderson, director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington School of Law who for six years served under Interior Secretary Bruce Babbit, providing legal advice on issues of Indian law and sovereignty, told the Journal in December. “It sets an important precedent for other communities that might be thinking about doing this. They can say, ‘Yes, it’s been done before in California.’ … This is a significant example of sort of forward-looking, modern good relationships between tribal government and non-tribal government. It seems this could be a shining example of what’s possible. It’s very important to Indian Country.”

Wiyot Tribal Chair Ted Hernandez was not immediately available to comment for this story but we'll update the post if we hear back from him.
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Thursday, May 23, 2019

Guy Fieri Makes His Mark on the Walk of Fame

Posted By on Thu, May 23, 2019 at 5:36 PM

A screenshot of Guy Fieri and his star. - WALK OF FAME VIDEO
  • Walk of Fame video
  • A screenshot of Guy Fieri and his star.
Celebrity chef Guy Fieri received his Walk of Fame moment this week in a celebration that saw the mayor of Flavortown lauded by actor Matthew McConaughey as the son of Ferndale took his place on the heralded walkway of terrazzo and bronze stars.

Fieri, a Food Network star who got his start selling pretzels in the Victorian Village, is perhaps best known for his television show "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives," which has included an episode on Humboldt County restaurants. (Read previous Journal coverage here.)

Check out all the action for yourself in this video of the Hollywood event.

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North Coast Night Lights: Rainy Night at 5th and F in Eureka

Posted By on Thu, May 23, 2019 at 10:35 AM

DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
Rain had come out of the blue and the weather was up in the air. I couldn’t find any stars anywhere, so I lit out to the downtown regions of Eureka, Humboldt County, California to find something interesting in the lights of civilization.

I had in mind finding a fire hydrant to work with as a foreground object in a city street scene. To me the fire hydrant in a city is akin to the lone fence post in the country, it’s one of those subjects that draws me somehow. Not that I have a lot of shots of them at all, but I do think about them. Actually, I’m not really sure I’ve ever focused on one in a composition, but I’ve been collecting images of them in my head.
Hmm, the stars gotta be around here somewhere ... rainy night self-portrait on the corner of 5th and F, Eureka, Humboldt County, California. A long exposure from the night of May 16, 2019. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • Hmm, the stars gotta be around here somewhere ... rainy night self-portrait on the corner of 5th and F, Eureka, Humboldt County, California. A long exposure from the night of May 16, 2019.
This night I had the bug to track one down and capture it in its native element. I found my candidate in one of the city’s neat yellow and cyan fire plugs down on the corner of 5th and F Streets. It had a certain character about it, and I liked the location for the lighting, the lines and the brick sidewalk.

Rain came and went all evening. Even between showers there seemed always to be some droplets floating in the air and landing on the lens. But the light quality from the city lights was beautiful, reflecting bright, rich colors off of the rain-soaked road’s gritty surface. Long exposures turned car lights to smooth streaks of light and color as they drove through the frame. I loved how the colors were working in the photographs.
The fire hydrant sitting on the corner of 5th and F Streets in Eureka, California. The light streaks in the image are from cars going by. In long exposures such as this, the cars moved almost entirely through the frame while the shutter was open, causing their lights to become streaks. The driving cars themselves are not bright enough to see. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • The fire hydrant sitting on the corner of 5th and F Streets in Eureka, California. The light streaks in the image are from cars going by. In long exposures such as this, the cars moved almost entirely through the frame while the shutter was open, causing their lights to become streaks. The driving cars themselves are not bright enough to see.
I’d brought a crystal ball I hadn’t used in ages to incorporate in a photograph somehow. There is something of a mild craze for photographing crystal balls these days, so it’s been in my mind’s eye of late. This crystal ball I bought for photography almost 25 years ago down at Globe Imports along the waterfront. (How many years has THAT place been gone?!) But unfortunately this night the rain was not cooperating, and I’d hardly played with it before I was driven back to the shelter of the car.
I set my crystal ball on the fire plug, holding it securely in place using a specialized compound: chewing gum (I packed it out, too). Looking through a crystal ball turns the world upside-down, but I thought that made the small scene inside it difficult to make out, so I flipped the crystal ball upside down so the scene inside was right side up. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • I set my crystal ball on the fire plug, holding it securely in place using a specialized compound: chewing gum (I packed it out, too). Looking through a crystal ball turns the world upside-down, but I thought that made the small scene inside it difficult to make out, so I flipped the crystal ball upside down so the scene inside was right side up.


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Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Council Delays Marketing Vote Amid Transparency Concerns

Posted By on Wed, May 22, 2019 at 6:56 PM

One of Eureka's tourist sights. - FILE
  • File
  • One of Eureka's tourist sights.
The Eureka City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to delay selecting a marketing services provider after questions were raised about the fairness of the process, with several council members pointedly voicing frustration at the lack of information provided to them, despite their requests.

So after several hours of discussion and public comment, the council opted to conduct another round of interviews with a new five-member panel to be selected by Mayor Susan Seaman. The item is scheduled to come back to the council June 18.

“One thing I really appreciate about being in office is public trust is everything. ... If we don’t have public trust, we don’t have anything,” Councilmember Kim Bergel said before the vote. “We’re not going to be able to move forward. It just trumps everything and the trust has been broken and that’s so unfortunate. So unfortunate. And so disappointing.”

At issue is a $370,000 annual contract to promote Eureka as a destination for visitors from near and far after the city decided earlier this year to end its decades-long association with the Eureka-Humboldt Visitors Bureau, primarily over a dissatisfaction with the bureau’s focus on selling the region’s redwoods as a tourism pull despite Eureka’s overwhelming role in bankrolling the countywide marketing effort.

After requesting proposals, two contenders made the final round for consideration — Humboldt Made, which currently runs a visitors’ center out of the Clarke Museum and spearheaded the Friday Night Market in Old Town, and the award-winning and highly regarded Virginia firm Eddy Alexander.

But, days before the staff recommended the council move forward with Humboldt Made in a narrow decision, Lost Coast Outpost published a series of text messages between the nonprofit’s Executive Director Alanna Powell and Rob Holmlund, the city’s direct of community development, that show she knew about staff plans to put marketing services out to bid before the issue went before the council and, in her role as the head of the visitor's center, had been asked to provide input on the request for proposals as it was being crafted by staff.

The disclosure led council members and members of the public to raise concerns about the selection process, which included a written proposal and two interviews with a 10-member panel.

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HSU Welcomes New President Tom Jackson Jr.

Posted By on Wed, May 22, 2019 at 4:56 PM

New President, Tom Jackson Jr. and his wife Mona Jackson. - IRIDIAN CASAREZ
  • Iridian Casarez
  • New President, Tom Jackson Jr. and his wife Mona Jackson.
The Humboldt State University bells rang loudly across campus, 12 rings, it was noon and a group of people were walking toward the library. Upon entering the jam-packed lobby filled with HSU faculty, students and community members , the crowd began to applaud: The new president had arrived.

Just a few hours after his announcement as the new president of HSU, Tom Jackson Jr. was ready to greet everyone who came to get a first impression. After about 20 minutes, Loren Blanchard, executive vice chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs for California State University, introduced Jackson and his wife.

“We welcome the opportunity not only to reside in this community but do all of the things we hope will happen over the next several years,” Jackson told the crowd. “So please, as we go through this process, I ask you seriously and deliberately to take the time to stop me and let’s chat. You could buy the cup of coffee (he said jokingly), but tell me your story because, for the two of us, that story is really what’s most important.”

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CSU Announces Hiring of HSU's First African-American President

Posted By on Wed, May 22, 2019 at 9:41 AM

Tom Jackson Jr. - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • Tom Jackson Jr.
The California State University Board of Trustees this morning appointed Tom Jackson Jr. as Humboldt State University’s next president.

A military veteran and Seattle, Washington, native, Jackson will be HSU’s first African-American president, coming from Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota, which he has helmed since 2014.

“There are few institutions that are as closely tied to the success of their respective communities as HSU,” Jackson said in a press release. “A degree from HSU can lift the life of the person earning it as well as the lives of their family, and those degree holders drive the success of the entire North Coast. I welcome the opportunity to work with HSU’s talented faculty and staff, alongside community members, to ensure that those life-altering opportunities are expanded for current and future students.”

At first glance, Jackson appears suited to address many of the challenges at HSU. According to a brief biography on the Black Hills State University website, Jackson is himself a first-generation college student, having graduated with an associate degree from Highline Community College in Washington before receiving a degree in business management from Minnesota’s Southwest State University. He went on to get a masters from Pennsylvania’s Shippensburg University before getting a doctorate in educational management from University of La Verne near Los Angeles. He will now be taking over HSU, which has put an emphasis on recruiting first-generation college students and in recent years has enrolled them in record numbers.

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