Wednesday, September 5, 2018

NYT Story Examines Heroin's Impact on Local Tribes and its Link to an Ailing River

Posted By on Wed, Sep 5, 2018 at 4:26 PM

The Klamath River near Ishi Pishi Falls. - FILE
  • File
  • The Klamath River near Ishi Pishi Falls.
The New York Times this week explores the devastating impacts of the nation's opioid crisis on Kaurk, Hoopa and Yurok tribal communities, placed in the context of their connection to the struggling health of the Klamath River — an integral link between the tribes as well as their past, present and future in the region.

It’s no secret that Humboldt County as a whole has been hit hard by the scourge of addiction with more opioid prescriptions than residents and an overdose death rate that is three times the state average and almost twice that of the nation — most involving methamphetamine or opiate intoxication.

But the tribal communities of Humboldt’s remote corners form an epicenter of that addiction epicenter, leaving few — if any — families untouched, a statistic that plays out across the nation.

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North Coast Night Lights: Trinidad Head Under a Full Moon

Posted By on Wed, Sep 5, 2018 at 10:47 AM

The full moon rises over Little Head, Trinidad Pier, and Trinidad Harbor. Trinidad Head is the silhouetted land mass on the right. - DAVID WILSON
  • David Wilson
  • The full moon rises over Little Head, Trinidad Pier, and Trinidad Harbor. Trinidad Head is the silhouetted land mass on the right.
Last weekend I had the pleasure of showing off Trinidad and Trinidad Head to an old family friend who was visiting from the prairie. Prairie folks don’t often see the edge of the continent, let alone this coastal gem that we have here on the Humboldt shore. Of course, my idea for a tour around the Head was to hike around it at night with my camera.

Trinidad Head extends into the ocean between Trinidad Pier and State Beach, a large forested promontory that shapes and protects Trinidad Harbor. A bulwark against the heaviest Pacific seas and weather, it also affords fantastic views from high above the ocean along a trail that skirts the formation’s perimeter while climbing a couple hundred feet of elevation.

My brother and I brought our friend to the base of the trail at State Beach after sunset Aug. 25. We each had flashlights, but with the light of the rising moon I knew it would never be completely dark. I was already powering up the trail to reach the big vistas near the top when immediately we were given a view back across the pier and harbor: a beautiful shot with the moon fresh above the horizon, its reflection skimming across the water to meet the glows of the row of lights on the pier. Setting up to take some photographs of that scene, I felt grateful that these unplanned gems so often present themselves when I go out.


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