Monday, October 10, 2016

Sheriff's Office Investigating County's 19th Homicide

Posted By on Mon, Oct 10, 2016 at 4:55 PM

cover-badge_.jpg
The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office is investigating another homicide, after a 23-year-old was stabbed to death in Weott on Friday night.

The homicide is the 19th recorded in the county so far this year, and comes in the midst of the county’s single grisliest annual homicide total in at least 30 years. It also puts the county on pace to record nearly 25 homicides this year.

Sheriff’s deputies responded to a report of a disturbance in the 400 block of Newton Road in Weott at about 10:40 p.m. Friday. While en route, deputies were advised that one of the subjects, a 23-year-old male, had been stabbed and driven to a local hospital, where he later died.

An investigation determined there was a physical altercation that led to the stabbing, according to the press release.

See the full release from the Sheriff’s Office copied below:


Homicide Investigation - Case 201605035
On Friday, October 7, 2016 at about 10:39 p.m. Humboldt County Deputies received a report of a disturbance on the 400 block of Newton Rd, Weott. While en route, Deputies were told one of the subjects, a 23 year old male, had been stabbed and driven to a local hospital. Deputies arrived at the Newton Rd residence to investigate the incident. Deputies determined there was a physical altercation between two males which resulted in the 23 year old male getting stabbed.
The 23 year old involved party was later pronounced deceased at the hospital.
Detectives were called to the crime scene and are investigating this incident.
Anyone with information for the Sheriff’s Office regarding this case or related criminal activity is encouraged to call the Sheriff’s Office at 707-445-7251 or the Sheriff’s Office Crime Tip line at 707-268-2539.


  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sunday, October 9, 2016

HumBug: Seasons Change

Posted By on Sun, Oct 9, 2016 at 3:00 PM

Tiny acmon blue butterfly. Each wing about the size of your little fingernail. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • Tiny acmon blue butterfly. Each wing about the size of your little fingernail.

Seasons change, and with them the insects we see. Headed toward winter now, there are fewer dragonflies. It seems the big common green darners are all gone now, migrated elsewhere. But on a recent stroll along the Van Duzen, I saw several others. A solitary dusty, old-looking western river cruiser and a couple too far off to identify.

Mylitta crescent butterfly, Each wing about as big as my thumbnail. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • Mylitta crescent butterfly, Each wing about as big as my thumbnail.

I saw several California sister butterflies. They all looked worn and tired, with faded and shredded wings. There were several small Mylitta crescent butterflies (Phyciodes mylitta), a few tiny gray (with a line of square orange dots) Acomon blues (Plebejus acmon). Interestingly enough this species may have several broods throughout the year and the colors vary from brilliant blue in spring, to dark gray later in the year. Their larvae form symbiotic relations with certain species of ant wherein the ants provide protection and the caterpillar secretes honeydew, which the ants consume.

Blazing star, about 4 inches across. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • Blazing star, about 4 inches across.

As there is every year, there was a single blazing star plant (Mentzelia laevicaulis) blooming on the river bar. Funny thing is that I see only a single one of this plant every year but in different places on the river bar.

Finally, near the end of my stroll, I noted one of the mosaic darner family of dragonflies patrolling a tiny sheltered side stream of the river. It never ceased its flight, only occasionally hovering for a few seconds. I don't know how long I spent trying all the tricks I know to get a good shot of it. When I posted it in an entomological site, I got a quick response that it was a shadow darner (Aeshna umbrosa). This large dragonfly is one of the most cold tolerant and is common throughout North America. It can often be seen late in the season patrolling along brushy riverbanks.




  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Fortuna Police Investigating Apparent Murder-Suicide

Posted By on Sun, Oct 9, 2016 at 10:42 AM

fortuna-police-department.jpg
UPDATE:
The Fortuna Police Department has identified the deceased as 50-year-old Steve Sisson and 81-year-old Jerry Sisson. No motive has yet been identified in the case.

PREVIOUSLY:
The Fortuna Police Department is investigating what it believes to be a murder-suicide that claimed the lives of a father and his son.

Police were called to a report of two unresponsive males at a home in the 1000 block of Emerald Lane yesterday afternoon and arrived to an 81-year-old Fortuna man and his son, 50, of Hydesville, dead of gunshot wounds. Police believed the son killed his father before turning the gun on himself.

Authorities aren't yet releasing names of the deceased. See the full press release from the Fortuna Police Department copied below.


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday, October 8, 2016

McKinleyville Man Killed in Morning Crash

Posted By on Sat, Oct 8, 2016 at 8:20 PM

chp-patch.gif
The California Highway Patrol is investigating a single car crash that left a pedestrian dead in McKinleyville before dawn today.

According to the CHP, Kevin Leigh Patton, 48, of McKinleyville, was travelling about 30 miles per hour westbound on Airport Road at about 5:10 a.m. in his 2005 Chevrolet Silverado. For unknown reasons, a pedestrian, 61-year-old Rocklin Luke Gulley, also of McKinleyville, walking eastbound on the on the north shoulder of the road stepped into the westbound lane of traffic, right in front of the Silverado. Gulley was struck and killed.

Neither alcohol nor drugs is suspected to have been a factor in the collision, which remains under investigation.

See the full press release from the CHP copied below:

On October 8, 2016, at approximately 0510 hours, CHP Officers responded to a traffic collision on Airport Road west of Central Avenue in Mckinleyville.  A 2005 Chevrolet Silverado, driven by Kevin Leigh Patton, age 48, of Mckinleyville, was traveling westbound on Airport Road at approximately 30 mph.  Rocklin Luke Gulley, age 61, of Mckinleyville, was walking eastbound near the north shoulder of Airport Road.  For reasons still under investigation, Gulley walked into the westbound lane of traffic and collided with the Chevrolet.  As a result of this collision, Gulley sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene by medical personnel.  Patton did not sustain any injuries as a result of the collision.  Alcohol and/or drugs are not suspected to have been a factor in this collision. 
 
The California Highway Patrol Humboldt Area is investigating this traffic collision. 


  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Friday, October 7, 2016

Starting the Conversation: HSU forum focuses on race, police

Posted By on Fri, Oct 7, 2016 at 11:47 AM

A packed house at the Kate Buchanan Room. - JAVIER ROJAS
  • Javier Rojas
  • A packed house at the Kate Buchanan Room.
Against the national backdrop of a recent spate of high profile shootings of unarmed black people by law enforcement, students, police and community members gathered on the Humboldt State University campus Thursday evening for a far-reaching conversation on race and policing.

Local law enforcement and members of the HSU black community sat side by side in the Kate Buchanan Room, discussing topics that ranged from police escalation to racism on campus.

A 13-person panel that included both Eureka and Arcata’s police chiefs, members of the African American Center for Academic Excellence and campus faculty answered questions from audience members throughout the two-hour forum titled “Black and Blue Dialogue.”

The audience filled the room to capacity, with speakers voicing concerns about police brutality and sharing first-hand accounts of racial bias. Among those was Gloria Brown, a child development major who spoke about the fears she faces just being around police.

The 13 person panel at the Black and Blue Dialogue takes questions from audience members. - JAVIER ROJAS
  • Javier Rojas
  • The 13 person panel at the Black and Blue Dialogue takes questions from audience members.
“I’m very cautious when I’m driving next to a police officer,” Brown said. “I just seem to get instantly nervous even if I’m at church, I just don’t feel comfortable if I see that badge.”

Brown wasn’t the only one who shared these concerns. Amy Salinas-Westmoreland, director for the HSU Multicultural Center, said a fear of police has become a basic instinct.

“It’s like something is constantly chasing you and, as an African-American, I fear for my students and staff of color on a daily basis,” Salinas-Westmoreland said. “It's really concerning to see students afraid for their own well being.”

Questions directed at law enforcement ranged from how they deal with racial sensitivity to training protocols. University Police Department Chief Donn Peterson said the department has recently put an emphasis on de-escalation tactics and the topic is something he is constantly looking at.

“Thirty years ago, it was something that we never got training on but things have changed,” Peterson said. “We do an okay job of it but we know we can do a whole lot better.”

Students criticized some of the responses law enforcement gave, citing assumptions and misunderstandings that the black community constantly faces with police. Eureka Police Chief Andrew Mills spoke about how the department is trying to grow and overcome those assumptions.

“We’ve got to do a better job at cultural sensitivity,” he said. “It’s a systemic problem that starts at the court and can’t continue to disproportionately stop people of color. It’s embarrassingly stark, but we can’t continue like this.”

The audience also included several members of local police departments who were there to support, as well as gain insight from, the forum.

HSU student Cameron Rodriguez and Humboldt County Sheriff's Sgt. Greg Allen sit next to each other taking questions about police brutality and race relations at Humboldt State. - JAVIER ROJAS
  • Javier Rojas
  • HSU student Cameron Rodriguez and Humboldt County Sheriff's Sgt. Greg Allen sit next to each other taking questions about police brutality and race relations at Humboldt State.
The biggest applause of the evening came in response to Salinas-Westmoreland, who called out HSU administration for its lack of presence at the forum. She also referenced University President Lisa Rossbacher’s email to students this week that stated “racism is not a norm on our campus,” which drew laughs from students in the audience. The MCC director said the email was a slap in the face to students of color.  

“How many people from administration are here?” she asked. “And how are they not being here helping these students? I’m fed up, quite honestly.”

The forum came to a close with a question to the panel asking what its members would take from the discussion going forward, and how they would apply it to their lives.

Corlis Bennett-Mcbride, director for the Cultural Centers for Academic Excellence at HSU, summed up the forum by tackling an issue many people agreed upon.

“Stop assuming,” Bennett-Mcbride said in reference to the tactics law enforcement have sometimes used on people of color. “If we can just stop assuming every black person is up to no good, we can cut half of the problems.”

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Early Prospects for Crab Season Look Good

Posted By on Tue, Oct 4, 2016 at 2:52 PM

North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman and state Sen. Mike McGuire during today's hearing. - JENNIFER SAVAGE
  • Jennifer Savage
  • North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman and state Sen. Mike McGuire during today's hearing.

So far, so good. That's the early word in today's extensively titled forum, "Crab Season Outlook for 2016-17 and Modern Aquaculture in California by the Joint Committee on Fisheries and Aquaculture" taking place right now at the University of California Davis Marine Lab in Bodega Bay. Convened by the North Coast's own state Sen. Mike McGuire, who chairs the committee, and attended by our U.S. Congressman Jared Huffman, the hearing offers scientists and fishery experts a chance to give their take on the upcoming California crab season. 

After last year's disastrous crab season was delayed due to high levels of the toxin domoic acid, attendees were visibly relieved to hear relative good news from University of California Santa Cruz's Dr. Raphael Kudela, professor of ocean health, that while 2016 was "warm and toxic," the probability of a domoic acid bloom impacting North Coast crabs has decreased over the last month. This is "really good for crab and fisheries," Kudela said. Ultimately what things look like next year is highly dependent on winter storm conditions, he said, but right now, "good news!" 

Additionally, this marks the first time that the Joint Committee has focused primarily on aquaculture (aka “farming in water"). The farmed fish, oysters and seaweed industry continues to expand and so today's panelists will explore finfish, shellfish, inland production and perspectives from state agencies.  

Huffman noted his pride in the Second District's oyster farmers, noting the industry is not only "innovative" and "sustainable," but also "delicious." Representing that valued part of Humboldt's economy at the forum were Coast Seafood Company's Southwest Operations Manager (and Humboldt Bay Harbor Commissioner) Greg Dale and Hog Island Oyster Company co-founder and CEO John Finger.

The hearing will be live-streamed until 4 p.m. and then archived for future viewing. 

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, October 3, 2016

HuMMAP, County Headed to Court

Posted By on Mon, Oct 3, 2016 at 11:25 AM

HUMBOLDT COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
  • Humboldt County Sheriff's Office
According to an email from Robert "Woods" Sutherland, spokesperson for the Humboldt Mendocino Marijuana Advocacy Project, the group is filing a lawsuit today against Humboldt County, alleging the county violated a settlement agreement the two entities signed June 29.

HuMMAP is alleging that the county violated the terms of their settlement, which called for the county to proceed without "further modifications" to the county's commercial medical cannabis ordinance. The original deadline to register existing grows was Aug. 23, but the county sent out a press release with a policy statement encouraging growers to continue registering, with the understanding that the time to apply and be "in good standing" had passed.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Flash Fiction: No, The Title Doesn't Count

Posted By on Mon, Oct 3, 2016 at 9:37 AM

The Tooth Ferret. - JOEL MIELKE
  • Joel Mielke
  • The Tooth Ferret.
Dust off those plot twists … the North Coast Journal Flash Fiction Contest is back! Send your original story of 99 words or fewer to our judges for a chance at publication and a prize.

Email your entries to fiction@northcoastjournal.com between now and 9 a.m. on Oct. 24. Be sure to include your name, address and phone number on your entry (contact info won’t be printed). Send all the stories you want, but save the poems for another competition, please.

Size up past winners here. And if you’re wondering just how long 99 words is, it’s exactly this long.

For inspirational purposes, find a few past winners copied below:

The 2015 overall winner:

Birding
By Lauri Rose, Bridgeville
A marsh is a hideaway kind of place, the kind of place you might take someone else's girlfriend for a secret kiss. Samuel didn't come for that. Samuel came to add another bird to his life list. But, sometimes a morning on the marsh can shift like mud beneath your feet and a man with binoculars might see more than he wants to see. A marsh is a hideaway kind of place, the kind of place you can toss a gun away and it will never be found.
Our fondness for the marsh aside, this one was up to something from the first sentence, then, like that shifting mud, things took a turn. Instead of a trick ending we're left with a little danger. All that with 11 words to spare. This was one of JoAnn Bauer's picks, too. She remarked, "This seemed to me like the beginning paragraph of a great detective story and I would definitely want to read it. It really stimulated my curiosity and imagination about what would happen next."


The 2014 overall winner:

Noses
By Peter Mehren, Toronto, Canada
"Let's get one thing straight," she said, as we sat chatting over coffees. "If we ever kiss, which I doubt will happen, but if we ever do, noses to the right."
I looked from her eyes to her nose and back again. "Meaning?"
"Meaning I don't want clumsy, amateurish bumping of noses and foreheads and chins. We're not beginners. If I ever decide you can kiss me, which — "
"I know: you doubt."
"Yes. It won't be a sneak attack, so don't think about doing that. No, just like deciding on which side of the road to drive: noses right."

Another 2014 favorite:

The Tooth Ferret
By Steve Brackenbury, Fortuna
They told him if he put his tooth under the pillow he would find money waiting for him in the morning.
"Dumb ferret," he muttered as he got under the covers; for you see, he had heard it all wrong. "Ferrets ain't got no pockets to keep things in and they're mean and dirty. I hate ferrets."
Midnight came. His eyes were shut but he was wide-awake. The bedroom door slowly opened. He tightened his grip on the handle of the sharp knife he had taken from the kitchen drawer. He was ready for that stupid old ferret.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Sunday, October 2, 2016

HumBug: Black Widows

Posted By on Sun, Oct 2, 2016 at 3:59 PM

A female against a 1-centimeter/1-millimeter grid. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • A female against a 1-centimeter/1-millimeter grid.

I spend a lot of my outdoor time looking for and at bugs. Especially ones that are dramatic looking or interesting to photograph, so when I noted a medium sized spider on the front of the Carlotta post office, I automatically got closer, tilted my head to use the reading portion of my bifocals and was surprised to see a tiny red hourglass on the creature's abdomen.
A female showing a ventral view of the red hourglass.  The white marks are on the front of her abdomen; her head (the business end) is tiny and below that. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • A female showing a ventral view of the red hourglass. The white marks are on the front of her abdomen; her head (the business end) is tiny and below that.
There are several other members of the large comb-footed spider family, theridiidae, which look similar in shape and size to the black widow, but only family latrodectus has the red hourglass on the underside of their abdomens. It is one of the best diagnostic features. If the red hourglass is there, it is dangerous to humans.
A female's hind foot showing the "comb foot," which is used to spread webbing when wrapping prey. Note the teensy hooks with which they climb on the scaffold of their webs. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • A female's hind foot showing the "comb foot," which is used to spread webbing when wrapping prey. Note the teensy hooks with which they climb on the scaffold of their webs.
Figures vary, but it seems there are about 2,000 bites reported in the U.S. per year and very few fatalities. The symptoms, I understand, are particularly unpleasant. I have only known one person who was bitten. Her health was not particularly robust and she spent several days in the hospital. She reported that it was like having one horrendous body cramp that just didn't quit for days.

The male of the species. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • The male of the species.
The spider gets its ominous name from the female's habit of eating the male after mating. Recent research indicates that our local species Latrodectus hesperus rarely does this, and the cannibalism may be a consequence of observing them in the laboratory where the male has no escape.

An article in Scientific American indicated they were toxic if consumed, however several species, including chickens and alligator lizards, seemed to eat them with no ill effects. The extremely long-legged cellar spiders are known to eat young widows, as well.
Female dorsal view (the white markings may be shed during next molt). - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • Female dorsal view (the white markings may be shed during next molt).
Widow spiders are nearly blind and are creatures of their web. If you see one walking on the ground, it is either seeking to get back to its web or looking for a place to make a new one. They spin a deceptively “messy” three dimensional web which may give them some protection from spider-hunting wasps. They are usually secretive, which leads to a common problem of people getting bit on the rump or genitals in outdoor privies. You sit down, make vibrations in the web, and she responds by rushing to potential prey and biting.




  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Fire Up the Chainsaws: Oak Woodlands Restoration Bill Signed

Posted By on Sun, Oct 2, 2016 at 3:30 PM

Firs swallowing a grove of black oak. - PHOTO BY LINDA STANSBERRY
  • Photo by Linda Stansberry
  • Firs swallowing a grove of black oak.
On Sept. 24, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill 1958, paving the way for landowners with conifer encroachment on oak woodlands to remove the invasive trees without replanting. The bill comes after more than a year of advocacy from small landowners and environmentalists who argued the existing rules by the state Board of Forestry were counter-intuitive to best practices in land management.

While slow-growing oak woodlands have been a dominant part of the Humboldt landscape for centuries, providing acorns and habitat for many species, the absence of fires has given quick-growing firs a chance to gain ground, shading out oaks and overtaking open ground. Previously the Board of Forestry has required an onerous timber harvest plan process to harvest and sell conifers. A.B. 1958 could ease these regulations, creating a seven-year pilot “exemption” to the THP process for smaller conifers and clarifying language around oak woodland restoration activities.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Recent Comments

Care2 Take Action?

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2022 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation