Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Bye, Bye, Baby

Posted By on Wed, Jan 14, 2015 at 4:23 PM

Seas of orange. Half an hour later this line was twice as long. - GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH
  • Grant Scott-Goforth
  • Seas of orange. Half an hour later this line was twice as long.
Giants fanatics are clamoring to the waterfront, trying to find purchase in the muddy slope to get a glimpse of the champions’ three World Series trophies.

Well, actually, it's pretty pleasant out, and, despite a line that wraps around the block, people are in good spirits. Get down to the Adorni Center by 5 this afternoon for a chance to check out the trophies up close and get your picture snapped pretending you’re not star struck.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Enter HSU’s Head-Bangin’ Chief

Posted By on Tue, Jan 13, 2015 at 4:01 PM

NCJ STAFF
  • NCJ Staff
Donn G. Peterson, Humboldt State University’s new California-born, fresh-from-Florida police chief, was sworn in on Jan. 5.

Buried in the “welcome-aboards” and “glad-to-be-heres” of the university’s press release was a thrashin’ fact about the new chief: he’s a “huge fan of Metallica.”

Does that mean the University Police Department will stop enforcing noise complaints? Will card-carrying Metallica fan club members get a pass on jaywalking? The ramifications are yet unclear, though you might want to invest in a Master of Puppets poster for your dorm room, just in case.

Peterson also wields an axe (a Fender Strat — more Hendrix than Hammett, but that’s OK), so if anyone’s looking to jam…

From the university:

Donn G. Peterson, a veteran of 29 years with law enforcement, began his tenure as Humboldt State University’s new chief of police.

The former Major for the Broward Sheriff's Office in South Florida, Peterson, 50, was sworn in as Humboldt State’s new police chief by university President Lisa Rossbacher on Jan. 5 in a small ceremony at University Police Department headquarters in the Student Business Services building. A more formal ceremony will be held later this spring.

“When I found out I was chosen to be the HSU police chief, I thought: ‘Did I win the lottery?’ I feel absolutely blessed, humbled and honored to have this opportunity.” says Peterson. He succeeds Lynne Soderberg, who was police chief for three years.

He brings nearly three decades of law enforcement experience, including 12 years of consecutive command-level experience in both large metropolitan areas and college campus enforcement services. He has a B.A. in Criminal Justice Management from Union Institute & University and is a graduate of the 216th session of the FBI National Academy.

“He has all the experience, training and the background,” says Vice President of Administrative Affairs Joyce Lopes. “That being said, he is approachable and down-to-earth, and that makes people feel comfortable, which will be important as he works with students, staff and faculty.”

Lopes said Peterson’s ties with not only California, but also academia makes him a good fit for this role. Peterson grew up in Sebastopol. His mom is an alumna of Sonoma State University, his father was Dean of the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources at the University of Delaware, and his brother is an elementary and special education teacher in Delaware.

“I grew up visiting my dad in the lab and going to college athletic events with my parents,” said Peterson.

According to Peterson, the decision to accept the top cop position at Humboldt State was a natural next step.

“I felt that I had obtained a wealth of experience and that it was time to do something different,” he said. “So the opportunity at HSU was serendipitous. I thought, here’s a place that’s related to my mom’s alma mater, the position is in a university setting, and it’s in Northern California. That all feels like home to me, and I wanted to come home.”

One of the most exciting aspects of working at HSU, he says, is the chance to interact with students. “What I really can’t wait for is to give students a chance to get to know me. More importantly, I want to get to know them and their concerns because they have a voice.”

Besides building relationships with students, Peterson plans to work with campus and community officials on campus crisis intervention efforts, such as helping students in distress and directing them to resources (such as mental health professionals).

He’s also eager to work with HSU’s Sexual Assault Prevention Committee (SAPC), a group of faculty, staff, students, law enforcement, and community partners dedicated to preventing sexual violence.

He has a beloved wife, Renee, son, Corey, and dog, Branson. He’s also the proud owner of a Fender Stratocaster electric guitar, which he plays in his spare time, and is a huge fan of Metallica.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Friday, January 9, 2015

UPDATE: Cutten Homicide Victim and Suspect IDed

Posted By on Fri, Jan 9, 2015 at 10:54 AM

CHRIS PENNINGTON
  • Chris Pennington

The victim of Thursday’s homicide and his alleged killer have been identified.

The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office says Ryan James Robinson, 22, of Rio Dell, was shot to death after an argument with 32-year-old Judson Allen Stiglich. They apparently knew each other.

From the sheriff’s office:

The Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office Detectives arrested, Judson Allen Stiglich age 32 for homicide for the shooting death of the victim, Ryan James Robinson age 22 from Rio Dell. During the investigation Detectives learned that the victim and suspect knew each other. On the day of the homicide the suspect shot the victim after a brief verbal argument with each other.

The female age 32 in this investigation was released by the Detectives after questioning and was not arrested. Judson Stiglich was booked into the Humboldt County Correctional Facility for Homicide, being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm and for possession for stolen property. The firearm used in the homicide was stolen from a victim out of the City of Fortuna. Stiglich’s bail has been set at one million dollars.


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Ho Ho Heave Ho

Posted By on Fri, Jan 9, 2015 at 7:57 AM

The Knittery's Christmas tree dress is so pretty. Maybe she can stay a little longer? - PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS
  • Photo by Heidi Walters
  • The Knittery's Christmas tree dress is so pretty. Maybe she can stay a little longer?
Your dear old Christmas tree wants to go back to the good green earth it came from. Come, compost! Come, energy! So get on it, before Valentine's Day smooches in to mock you and your tree. You can drop your tree off for recycling at one of the places listed below, or call for curbside pickup. Mind the deadlines!

ARCATA
Mad River Compost, 6360 West End Road, Arcata, through Jan. 30 (free)
Eel River Resource Recovery, 555 Vance Ave., Samoa, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.–Fri., until Jan. 15 (free)
Arcata High School students will pick your tree up curbside through Jan. 18 ($10). Call 822-8325.

BLUE LAKE
Prasch Hall, near the baseball fields, for Blue Lake Garbage to pick up, through Jan. 18 (free)
Arcata High School students will pick your tree up curbside through Jan. 18 ($15). Call 822-8325.

EUREKA
Humboldt Waste Management Authority Transfer Station, 1059 W. Hawthorne St., through Jan. 12 (free); no commercial trees.
Curbside pickup by Recology, Jan. 2 and Jan. 9 ($5). Call 44205711 for appointment.

FERNDALE
City’s Barn, Francis Street, through Jan. 9 (free).
Eel River Disposal Transfer Station, 965 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna, through Jan. 15 (free)
Eel River Disposal curbside pick-up ($12 per tree). Call 725-5156.

FORTUNA
Eel River Disposal Transfer Station, 965 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna, through Jan. 15 (free)
Eel River Disposal curbside pick-up ($12 per tree). Call 725-5156.

MCKINLEYVILLE
Humboldt Sanitation Transfer Station, 2585 Central Ave., through Jan. 18 (free)
Arcata High School students will pick your tree up curbside through Jan. 18 ($15). Call 822-8325.

RIO DELL
Eel River Disposal Transfer Station, 965 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna, through Jan. 15 (free)
Eel River Disposal curbside pick-up ($12 per tree). Call 725-5156.

TRINIDAD
Behind Murphy’s Market through Jan. 30 (free)

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Not Today, Bike Thieves

Posted By on Wed, Jan 7, 2015 at 5:47 PM

Maybe they do grow on trees. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Maybe they do grow on trees.

Somebody locked his or her sweet fixie up in one of Mother Nature's bike racks in front of Old Town Coffee and Chocolates in Eureka today. Just makes us want to steal the whole damn tree. 
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: ,

Holy Congressional Infographic, Batman!

Posted By on Wed, Jan 7, 2015 at 3:52 PM

North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman’s first term in office has been no cakewalk. In fact, it’s involved a lot of elbow grease and heavy lifting. Don’t’ believe it? Well, check out this handy infographic The Huff put together to show you just how much he’s accomplished over the past two years.

image003.jpg

See? He’s sent 92,709 letters and emails responding to constituents. That’s about 128 a day! Not impressed? Well, consider that he’s spoken to some 6,631 constituents on the phone, an average of nine a day, every day of his two-year term (that includes TWO Christmases!). Almost 4,400 of his constituents have toured the White House and the Capitol Building (six a day!), and he’s helped 2,889 of them close casework, solving real life problems that they needed a little government help navigating. And, somehow, he even found time to author three bills that were ultimately signed into law (not including another to stiffen penalties on trespass pot growers that the federal sentencing commission then took up on its own), and cosponsored almost 500 more.

The graphic — which doesn’t even bother to mention Huffman was slowed for part of his term by an unfortunate baseball accident — even notes the congressman found some time between Capitol tours and constituent emails to sit down for an interview with Stephen Colbert.

Wait a minute. He can’t have this much time, can he? Is he some kind of shape-shifting, super congressman that can slow time by flying around the planet?

Unfortunately, no, he’s not. Huff spokesman Paul Arden informs us that the numbers used in the infographic represent the work of Huffman’s entire 19-person staff. That's like, what, a half a constituent phone call per-staffer, per-day? Sigh. Who wants to bet Huffman didn’t even push a pixel on the graphic itself?

Kidding aside, it’s worth noting that Huffman has just put the bow on a pretty solid freshman term. Stephanie Burkhalter, a professor of politics at Humboldt State University whose research focuses on Congress, said Huffman’s first term in office has been an impressive one. She pointed not only to his three bills that ultimately garnered the president’s signature, but also a February 2014 letter to Attorney General Eric Holder asking him directly to work to reclassify marijuana from a Schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act. The letter was signed by a diverse group of lawmakers, Burkhalter said, and spoke to Huffman’s willingness to seek out partners and take bold stances.

He also pushed forward with the plans for dam removal on the Klamath, and took up the task of badgering the Department of the Interior into recognizing Humboldt County's rights to 50,000 acre feet of water from Trinity Lake.

All in all, for a freshman representative from a small, mostly rural district, the Huff has held his own with an agenda his constituents can get behind, Burkhalter said.

Now, think how much he could get done if he could only master that shapeshifting thing.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

UPDATED: Coroner IDs Fortuna Crash Victim

Posted By on Tue, Jan 6, 2015 at 4:41 PM

fortuna-police-department.jpg
UPDATE: The woman killed by her own car in a Fortuna accident Monday has been identified as 32-year-old Victoria Pruett, according to Humboldt County Deputy Coroner Trevor Enright, who said Pruett died of blunt force trauma.

PREVIOUSLY:
The Humboldt County Coroner’s Office has yet to publicly identify the woman killed in a single-vehicle crash Monday in Fortuna.

The Fortuna Police Department reported that officers were called to the 100 block of 12th Street at about 2:15 p.m. to a report of a 1997 Ford Explorer that had crashed into a vacant apartment complex. After arriving on scene, officers found that a woman had been fatally injured in the crash.

Fortuna Police Lt. Matt Eberhardt said a preliminary investigation has determined that the woman was the owner of the Explorer, but was outside the vehicle when it pinned her against the vacant apartment complex. “We seized the vehicle for further investigation and there is some indication that we suspect a possible mechanical issue (caused the crash),” he said.

Eberhardt declined to comment on whether anyone else was in the vehicle at the time of the crash, saying “it’s still under investigation at this point.” But Eberhardt said there’s no indication of any ongoing danger to the public.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

UPDATE: Worker Killed in Mill Accident

Posted By on Tue, Jan 6, 2015 at 1:19 PM

The site of the accident. - GOOGLE MAPS
  • Google Maps
  • The site of the accident.

The coroner’s office identified the victim of yesterday’s industrial accident as 64-year-old Mike Vander Veen of Forest Hill, California.

The cause of death appears to be accidental electrocution, according to the office, and an autopsy is scheduled for Jan. 8.

Deputy Coroner Trevor Enright declined to say who Vander Veen was working for, citing an ongoing California Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigation.

Previously:

A 64-year-old contract worker was killed this morning when his boom lift apparently came into contact with a high voltage line at an Arcata mill.

After receiving emergency calls around 9 a.m., “crews found the basket approximately 25 feet in the air with the patient unconscious in the basket,” according to an Arcata Fire press release. “The boom was not in contact with the overhead electric transmission lines but was within inches of the lines. Firefighters immediately started coordinating with workers on scene to drain the hydraulic fluid of the boom to lower the basket and make access to the patient. After moving stacks of stock out of the way, they were able to lower the basket to the ground and paramedics determined that the man was dead.”

The victim will not be identified until his next of kin has been notified. The mill, OSHA, PG&E and emergency responders are investigating the accident. It's unclear who the victim was working for at the time of the accident.

From Arcata Fire:

Manila, CA- (January 6, 2015)- At approximately 9:00 this morning, Arcata Fire District and Arcata-Mad River Ambulance were dispatched to 2593 New Navy Base Road for an industrial accident involving a possible electrocution. While responding to the scene, emergency personnel received further information indicating that there was a patient in the basket of a boom truck and he may have come in contact with a high-voltage power line.

Arcata Fire crews found the basket approximately 25 feet in the air with the patient unconscious in the basket. The boom was not in contact with the overhead electric transmission lines but was within inches of the lines. Firefighters immediately started coordinating with workers on scene to drain the hydraulic fluid of the boom to lower the basket and make access to the patient. After moving stacks of stock out of the way, they were able to lower the basket to the ground and paramedics determined that the man was dead.

Arcata Fire District is currently coordinating with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Department, OSHA, PG&E and the mill management on this investigation. The name of the victim is not being released at this time pending notification of next of kin.

Arcata Fire responded with two Chief Officers, one engine and one truck. Humboldt Bay Fire provided one Chief Officer and one engine to help cover the fire district. This tragic incident serves as a reminder to everyone to be careful whenever working around power lines. Remember to look up, down and all around when working near power lines and if you see downed power lines, never touch them.
From the sheriff’s office:

On Tuesday, January 6, 2015, at about 9:15 AM, the Sheriff’s Office received a call for service regarding an industrial accident that had occurred at the Emerson Mill, located at 2593 Hwy 255, near Arcata. Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the scene, along with Arcata Fire, and PG&E personnel.

Once on scene, Deputies met with on-site Safety Personnel, and learned a 64 year old man had been fatally injured in the industrial accident. The victim was a Contractor, who was conducting tests and repairs on equipment at the facility. It was reported the man was operating a boom lift, and may have come into contact with a power line.
Cal/OSHA was notified, and will be responding to the scene. The investigation was turned over to the Coroner’s Office.

The name of the man will not be released until next of kin has been notified.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , ,

Friday, January 2, 2015

Long-Time Weather Boss Retires

Posted By on Fri, Jan 2, 2015 at 5:36 PM

Nancy Dean, meteorologist in charge of the Weather Forecast Office in Eureka, washing cars as part of a fundraiser in 2011. - PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
  • Photo courtesy of the National Weather Service
  • Nancy Dean, meteorologist in charge of the Weather Forecast Office in Eureka, washing cars as part of a fundraiser in 2011.

After 36 years with the National Weather Service — 20 of those as the meteorologist in charge at the Eureka Weather Forecast Office on Woodley Island — Nancy Dean has retired. Her last day was today.

“She’s been a great boss,” said Troy Nicolini on the phone this afternoon. “I feel really thankful. … I’ve had some crazy ideas over the years, and she’s always been really supportive. Every time I bring an idea to Nancy, she supports it and adds to it. She’s an extremely strong thinker, and that’s been the theme for the entire 17 years I’ve worked for her. She’s just a rock-solid, unbelievably hardworking person.”

One of the “crazy ideas” the local weather service ran with, along with other local partners, was tsunami preparedeness. As Nicolini writes in a news release:

“On the heels of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Nancy's team embarked on an aggressive approach to preparedness that used drills, tests, and exercises as the primary tool for ensuring that communities would respond correctly during a real tsunami. This was a significant departure from traditional preparedness activities that were based on presentations and written educational material.”

Nicolini said that, under Dean, the Eureka office took on other nontraditional roles, such as being the first weather service office in the nation to focus on educating the public about so-called sneaker waves (they don’t technically “sneak,” but you can be surprised by them if you don’t pay attention to the conditions in which they occur and don’t know what to watch for).

“We’re the first ones in the nation who started that,” said Nicolini, “even though sneaker waves are a major killer on the West Coast. And they’re the No. 1 weather killer here in our area.”

Nicolini outlined some of Dean’s and her staff’s accomplishments during her tenure in his news release:

“One of the outstanding categories of accomplishments for the Eureka office has been in the area of marine weather. Nancy's team made significant contributions to the advancement of marine forecasting and product delivery. For example, they developed a first-of-its kind high resolution nearshore wave model that addresses a range of marine forecast issues. These include general wave forecasting where the new technology has cut in half the time needed to produce a forecast that is also superior. This technology has spread through the National Weather Service and is now being pipelined into the standard forecast environment for all offices. This new technology has also supported solutions to regionally specific high impact issues such as harbor entrance forecast development that addresses one of the deadliest hazards in the marine environment. This level of research and development is uncommon from an operational field office with 24/7 forecast responsibilities, and it shows the level of dedication and commitment that Nancy has inspired in her staff.

“Nancy's office has also made significant advances in the approach to community preparedness for tsunamis. On the heels of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Nancy's team embarked on an aggressive approach to preparedness that used drills, tests, and exercises as the primary tool for ensuring that communities would respond correctly during a real tsunami. This was a significant departure from traditional preparedness activities that were based on presentations and written educational material. This approach was tested during the recent 2011 tsunami from Japan and the results were startling. Emergency officials reported that the real evacuations felt like drills because everything went so smoothly and because the public was completely calm.

“Nancy has also always believed that NOAA’s line offices should work together to accomplish the overarching goals of NOAA. She tirelessly contributed to the NOAA West team while also looking for ways to support fellow NOAA offices in northwestern California. She has been the driving force in uniting the NOAA of the region and this has resulted in very successful collaborative efforts to support NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service in their management of migratory salmon.

“Nancy's leadership has had positive impacts far beyond the area covered by the Eureka Weather Forecast office because she has been very effective at developing her staff into future leaders. Nancy creates an office culture where everyone feels empowered to take risks and to innovate solutions to significant problems. Her effectiveness is shown by the high number of leadership positions held by former members of Nancy's office. As an illustration, both the east coast and west coast regional marine program leaders, as well as the national marine program leader all started on the marine team at the Eureka Weather Forecast Office under Nancy's leadership. …”

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Yes, That's Humboldt County's Water

Posted By on Fri, Jan 2, 2015 at 3:12 PM

news1-003.jpg
Four years after a request from the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors, the federal government has decided, per a solicitor's review, that the county does indeed have the right to an annual 50,000 acre-feet of water it was promised back when the Trinity River was dammed.

At the urging of Congressman Jared Huffman, apparently, the federal Department of the Interior, which oversees the Bureau of Reclamation (which controls the flow of water out of the Trinity River dam system) made its internal legal opinion decision public recently. 

“Humboldt County’s annual right to 50,000 acre feet of water from Trinity Lake is not a close call – it was explicitly guaranteed by statute and in a federal contract six decades ago, but these commitments have been ignored by the federal government,” Huffman said in a press release.

The bureau has been caught between Humboldt County and North Coast tribes, who have repeatedly called for additional water releases in the dry years since a 2002 Klamath River fish kill, and farmers from the Central Valley who've enjoyed Trinity River water for irrigation since the river was dammed in the 1950s. 

The recent legal opinion decision clarifies that the 50,000 acre feet of water Humboldt County bargained for is in addition to other North Coast rights to Trinity River water.

Read the full press release below, and read the Bureau of Reclamation's opinion decision 

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Recent Comments

Care2 Take Action?

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2021 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation