Friday, May 30, 2014

Poison Accord

Posted By on Fri, May 30, 2014 at 5:32 PM

The maker of d-Con®, Reckitt Benckiser, will no longer sell the poison pellets that happy homemakers for years have used to fatally banish unwelcome rodents (and which some marijuana farmers have used to clear their crops of pests, resulting in the deaths of wildlife).

New legislation already bans the general, non-permitted use of such poisons in California, beginning July 1, and many retailers have quit restocking their shelves. Now the d-Con folks have agreed with the EPA to altogether quit selling specific poison baits that cause animals who ingest them to bleed to death within a day unless they receive an anticoagulant such as Vitamin K (as noted in a Wall Street Journal story about the agreement).

The company has until 2015 to stop selling the bait. In a news release, the Humane Society's Nicole Paquette said, "Although under this agreement Reckitt Benckiser is allowed to continue to sell these harmful products until the end of the year, we urge retailers to remove them from store shelves immediately.”

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014

[UPDATED: With More Zaniness] A Brief, Incomplete History of Local TV Ads

Posted By on Wed, May 28, 2014 at 4:08 PM

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In case you haven't seen it yet, this week's cover is all about local TV ads. But, since we don't have magical moving newspapers a la Harry Potter, readers are left with still images of some of our most (in)famous commercial productions. Except for here, online, where you can behold the glory of decades of Humboldt TV ads. You'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll pull your hair, you'll get sentimental.

Unfortunately, not everything is online. Much of Corky Cornwell's oeuvre is still on tape in storage. Online searches yielded little result for the famous Harvey Harper commercials of yore. But here's a collection of other wacky local ads you'll likely recognize.

Did we miss some? Tell us your favorites in the comments. Share links if you can find 'em online!

  • Some Corky nostalgia.



  • A Rick St. Charles two-parter — 20 years of his own favorite ads produced between 1985 and 2005. Rick's website.



  • Matt St. Charles has been behind this writer's favorite local ads for Sole Savers. Check 'em out on his YouTube channel and website.



  • Chad Johnson writes jingles and produces TV commercials.



  • Malcolm DeSoto's production company Runaway Kite. See his Vimeo channel here.



  • College of the Redwoods associate professor Montel Vanderhorck does occasional commercial work, including two spots for the Humboldt Crabs that can be seen here. (Disclaimer: this writer appears in one.)



    Journal reader and "former underpaid ad hack at Channel 3" Steve Spain submitted a handful of his favorites during his tenure at the station:









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Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Until Next Year, Kinetic Grand Championship

Posted By on Tue, May 27, 2014 at 9:17 AM

MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
The Kinetic Grand Championship wrapped on Ferndale's Main Street yesterday. Humboldt State University journalism professor emeritus Mark Larson, of Mark Larson Photography, was there for the finish. He was also there two days and 40-something miles earlier, when the glorious human-powered machines took off from the Arcata Plaza to embark on a colorful journey across dunes, water and highways. Here are a selection of Larson's photos:

MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography


MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography
MARK LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY
  • Mark Larson Photography

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Monday, May 26, 2014

The Final Kinetic Push

Posted By on Mon, May 26, 2014 at 9:54 AM

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If you've missed out on Kinetic weekend, it's not too late to rush down to Ferndale to catch the racers in their glorious push to the finish line. At this point, their machines are probably a bit waterlogged and sand-whipped after trekking 30-something miles over asphalt, dunes and the chilly waters of Humboldt Bay. And the riders probably aren't faring much better. But the finish line of the Kinetic Grand Championship is in site, and machines will start crossing around noonish, greeted by throngs of Kinetic faithful who are already beginning to gather on Ferndale's Main Street for their last taste of glory until next year.
BOB DORAN
  • Bob Doran
BOB DORAN
  • Bob Doran
BOB DORAN
  • Bob Doran
BOB DORAN
  • Bob Doran
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Friday, May 23, 2014

Cash Flows into Supes Races

Posted By on Fri, May 23, 2014 at 4:01 PM

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The last batch of campaign finance report statements came in this week to the Humboldt County Elections Office, with the county’s four supervisorial candidates reporting raising a total of more than $108,000 in the filing period, which ran March 18 through May 17.

That means an average of about $1,800 poured into local supes campaigns daily during the 60-day filing period, with incumbent 5th District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg leading the cash race, reporting donations totaling more than $41,000 for the period. If there was a surprise in the reporting period, it would have to be that 4th District challenger Chris Kerrigan outraised incumbent Virginia Bass for the period by more than $6,000. Kerrigan, who has made repeated mention on the campaign trail of being up against “big money” in the election, still trails Bass considerably in year-to-date contributions (Bass reports having raised $42,863 to Kerrigan’s $39,744) and year-to-date expenditures, with Bass having shelled out $81,439 on the 2014 campaign trail to Kerrigan’s $35,921.

Here’s a closer look at the reports in each race:

Continue reading »

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Last Day For Mc'Ville's Paul's Live Pizza

Posted By on Fri, May 23, 2014 at 12:56 PM

Goodbye to Paul's Live From New York Pizza's McKinleyville restaurant
  • Goodbye to Paul's Live From New York Pizza's McKinleyville restaurant

Well, hell. Now there will be no more reason to detour off the highway, en route from Patrick’s Point to Eureka, for a pint and slice at Paul’s Live From New York Pizza in McKinleyville.

Today’s the tasty joint’s last day. Today, as in May 23, 2014. There’ll be lotsa tears in beers, we imagine.

On the phone this afternoon from Paul’s Live’s Eureka location, owner Paul Amato shared this news, and more. He said his landlords, Dave and Dana Figueiredo, sold to CVS the building that houses both the McKinleyville Paul’s Live pizzeria and Figueiredo's Video Movies, and gave Amato a 30-day notice (Amato says his lease was up June 1). If the sale news is true, CVS likely will put in a new pharmacy there (see our previous coverage of CVS’s purchase of the McKinleyville Lima’s Pharmacy). Dana Figueiredo declined to comment when we reached her by phone, and we’re waiting to hear back from CVS.

Amato says he’s relocating all of the equipment from the McKinleyville restaurant to the former Porter Street Barbecue site on Samoa Boulevard in Arcata, where he plans to open a new Paul’s Live there within the next four to five months.

“We’re going to be doing whole pies, parties and other stuff,” Amato says about the new Arcata location. “We’ll have an outdoor patio, with heat lamps, and approximately 20 beers on tap.”

He says some employees are sticking with him in the transition, and some have “gone their own way.”

The current Arcata Paul’s Live, on Ninth Street, is staying open, Amato adds, and both Arcata locations will be offering delivery to McKinleyville. Eventually, Amato says, he might do something different with the Ninth Street Paul’s Live (which he bought from his parents six months ago).

The Eureka Paul’s Live, meanwhile, isn’t going anywhere, Amato says: “Eureka is solid.”

But there’s more: Amato says he plans to bring Paul’s Live back to McKinleyville someday — “a year to a year and a half,” he says.

So, something to live for. (Just kiddin’, Mc’Ville, of course you have other detour-worthiness.)

—-

UPDATE: Michael DeAngelis, director of public relations for CVS Pharmacy, has sent an email saying "we have no announcement for a new CVS/pharmacy location in McKinleyville at this time."

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Thursday, May 22, 2014

Care Home Shut Down, Owner Suspended

Posted By on Thu, May 22, 2014 at 5:13 PM

THINKSTOCK
  • THINKSTOCK
The state has shut down Chamberlain’s Residential Care Facility for the elderly, at 3252 Lucia Road in Eureka, and suspended the license of the home’s operator, Gina Chamberlain, accusing her of numerous health and safety code violations, including taking a client’s prescription narcotics for her own use.

The state’s “order of temporary suspension of license” was issued May 5, and the five residents of the six-client capacity home were relocated to other facilities before the home’s shutdown on May 8, says Michael Weston, spokesman for the Community Care Licensing Division of the state’s Department of Social Services.

In its complaint requesting the suspension of Chamberlain’s license to operate, the state alleges that Chamberlain not only took a client’s drugs for her own use, but also told a client’s nurse practitioner that the client was taking prescribed hydrocodone “several times a day for weeks” even though the client wasn’t; locked a client in a bedroom and blocked the door with a baby gate; failed to give a client medication properly; overcharged two clients, a husband and wife, by $13,100; cashed $52,400 worth of checks from a client’s checking account; and took a client’s car and Rolex watch.

The complaint requests that Chamberlain be prohibited “for the remainder of [her] life” from having anything to do with a state-licensed care facility.

Chamberlain has the right to appeal the suspension before an administrative law judge, says Weston. The Journal is trying to reach Chamberlain and will update this story as we learn more.
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Klamath in Congress

Posted By on Thu, May 22, 2014 at 11:34 AM

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UPDATE: In a statement released today, May 22, Congressman Jared Huffman calls the senators' new Klamath bill "a milestone toward an historic effort to revive California's ailing salmon stocks, improve water quality and build economic resilience" and says it "provides a framework for ending decades of conflict through the biggest dam removal project in the United States and an ambitious restoration and water allocation program."

He also promises this: "[M]y commitment to the Klamath Basin’s stakeholders will remain at the heart of my work on this matter — work that will be bicameral and hopefully bipartisan.”

——-
Previously:

Legislation introduced May 21 by California and Oregon senators would turn a trio of Klamath Basin restoration and water-use agreements into law — after many, many, many years of hair-tearing and deliberations among a broad array of Klamath river users including tribes, ranchers, fishermen and more.

The Upper Klamath Basin Comprehensive Agreement, the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement and  Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement together would settle water rights disputes, balance water uses and authorize removal of four dams on the Klamath, among other things. They need Congressional approval to move forward, and California senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer and Oregon senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley have given it that push, according to their join news release.

Now the bill goes to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

You can read more about the agreements here and here.

You can read the news release here and below:

Continue reading »

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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Biologist Gets 10 Months for Yurok Grift

Posted By on Tue, May 20, 2014 at 4:58 PM

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A judge today sentenced a local biologist to serve 10 months in prison for his role in conspiring to embezzle nearly $1 million in federal funds from the Yurok Tribe over a three-year period beginning in 2007, according to Yurok Tribal Chairman Thomas O’Rourke.

Mad River Biologists founder Ron LeValley pleaded guilty in February to a single count of conspiring to embezzle funds from an Indian tribal organization and faced up to two and half years in federal prison in the case. The U.S. Attorney’s Office and the federal probation department felt a one year prison sentence was appropriate in the case, but U.S. District Court Judge William Alsup ultimately opted for the 10-month sentence, citing cooperation with a federal investigation into the grift — cooperation that led directly to the conviction of LeValley’s co-conspirator, former Yurok Tribe Forestry Director Roland Raymond, who was sentenced to a three-year prison term in January.

LeValley’s attorney, William Kimball, argued that his client’s criminal conduct was a blip in an otherwise law-abiding life and that he should be spared a prison confinement.

Reached after the sentencing, O’Rourke said he was very disappointed in the sentence, and the system. “He’s considered a leader in the community, and pillars of the community are held to higher standards,” he said. “In my mind, and in the tribe’s mind, he’s a crook. And, basically, he was slapped on the wrist with the sentence.”

According to court documents, LeValley and Raymond conspired to steal the funds through a complex scheme of fake and inflated invoices and payments for northern spotted owl survey work that Mad River Biologists never performed. In court documents, LeValley claims Raymond told him he was using the ill-gotten funds to pay for tribal forestry and fire crews. LeValley said he thought he was helping the tribe and its members, but concedes he knew what he was doing was, in fact, illegal. Court documents also indicate that none of the stolen funds paid for the work crews and that they were instead spent to support Raymond’s drug and gambling addictions.

As a part of their sentences, both Raymond and LeValley have been ordered to repay the $852,000 they stole from the tribe.

Mad River Biologists submitted more than 75 false invoices between 2007 and 2010, according to court documents. Under the scheme, Raymond would then cut checks from the tribe and LeValley would funnel the money back to him, less 20 percent taken off the top.

The survey work that was never done was primarily looking for habitats for the federally endangered northern spotted owl to determine what tribal properties could be logged without harming owl populations. It’s unclear whether Raymond and LeValley’s conspiracy affected timber harvest plans or led to the destruction of potential owl habitats.

In addition to having founded Mad River Biologists in Arcata, LeValley is an acclaimed wildlife photographer and birder, and was a member of the Marine Life Protection Act science advisory team for the North Coast. He lives in Mendocino County and is due to surrender to authorities in July to begin serving his sentence in a minimum security prison.

In a memorandum urging Alsup to keep his client out of prison, Kimball noted that the court received more than 80 letters in support of LeValley, many lauding his many volunteer endeavors and charitable acts. “These letters tell the story of a man who has consistently put service to others and to his community before himself,” Kimball wrote. “The profound, positive impact that Ron has had, and continues to have, on so many lives should be a powerful mitigating factor as the court weighs the appropriate sentence for his offense.”

O’Rourke said LeValley has never taken full responsibility for his actions, or showed remorse for the damage he’s done to the Yurok Tribe. “He said he was duped, that he was tricked,” the chairman said. “He’s an intelligent man, a business man, and he didn’t get this far in life being tricked … The Yurok Tribe is very disappointed in the sentence, and in the system.”

For more information on the case, see past Journal coverage herehere and here.
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Monday, May 19, 2014

'Does that Mean Trails are Back?'

Posted By on Mon, May 19, 2014 at 3:54 PM

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The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously this afternoon to put language in the General Plan Update’s Conservation and Open Space element supporting the creation of a “regional trail system.”

Today’s meeting kicked off on an unusual note, as 5th District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg cued up his cell phone’s speakerphone and played a voice mail he’d received recently from an unidentified, angry sounding woman who decried Sundberg and his fellow board members as liars for “taking trails out” of the General Plan Update. While short on specifics, the voice mail was likely referring to a controversial Feb. 18 vote of the Humboldt County Planning Commission that recommended eliminating language from the open space element supporting the stated goal of “a countywide trail system that meets future recreational and non-motorized transportation demands.”

The commission’s 4-2 vote in February caused a bit of a firestorm from trail advocates, who felt the stated goal of a countywide trail system was important to have in the element. Some even charged (erroneously) that the vote took trails out of the general plan entirely.

When the matter wound up before the board this afternoon — with staff recommending the board reject the planning commission’s recommendation — it was quickly apparent that there was a consensus on the board supporting trails and the goal of creating some type of overarching system. Second District Supervisor Estelle Fennell suggested the board swap in the term “regional” for “countywide,” saying it was less restrictive.

Sundberg agreed with the suggestion, saying it was also more consistent with other parts of the GPU, especially the Circulation Element, which contains numerous references to a “regional trail system.” The supervisor also noted that he’s heard “angst” from a number of farmers and owners of Timber Harvest Zone landowners who feared the stated goal of an expansive trail system might lead to the county using eminent domain to turn private lands into public trails.

County planning staff said such concerns are unfounded, as the county policy limits use of eminent domain for matters affecting public health and safety or national security, and would not permit a public land grab for recreational purposes.

After minimal discussion, and a few comments from the public, the vote was unanimous.

“Does that mean trails are back in the general plan?” Board Chair Rex Bohn asked.

“I wish I could call my friend back,” Sundberg quipped as some in the audience applauded.
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