Wednesday, September 23, 2020

The Peg House is Up for Sale

Posted By on Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 7:16 PM

According to an SFGate story by former Journal staffer Ashley Harrell, now the outlet’s associate editor covering California parks, owners Diana Ballard-Doll and Gary Ballard are ready to sell the iconic burger pit stop to the right people for a cool $3 million. That includes 5.5 acres of land, the general store, the burger joint/patio/stage and the gas station. Their hope is to find new owners who'll run it all with the same community spirit they have. Ballard-Doll is quoted saying, “No one goes by here hungry or thirsty. If they’re cold, we give them a blanket. If the park is closed, people know they can come here and put up a tent on the stage. When there’s a fire, everyone knows the Peg House is a safe spot, and they come park here.”

FILE
  • File
Even if you're not looking to invest, the story is a fascinating trip down Peg House history, starting with its first white settlers and the lumber industry, the start of the shop in the 1920s, and the visitors and psychedelic concerts it has hosted over the decades. And, of course, and the burgers folks "never don't stop" for.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , ,

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Dokkaebier Spices it Up

Posted By on Tue, Sep 22, 2020 at 8:48 AM

If the Booth Brewing was your gateway to Korean beer aesthetics, you'll be pleased to know Dokkaebier has made its way into Humboldt stores. The independent beer company's CEO Youngwon Lee, formerly of the Booth's Humboldt operation, launched the Bay Area-brewed beer at San Francisco Beer Week in February on the cusp of shelter in place. His head brewer is fellow Booth alumnus Aaron Weshnak, who cooks up the recipes — featuring flavors like galangal, bamboo leaf and lemongrass — here in Humboldt.

SUBMITTED
  • Submitted

Lee, who came to Humboldt from South Korea in 2017 (though he grew up in Guam and New Jersey), is based in Oakland and, unable to find the right facility in our county, works with a brewery there to produce what Weshnak cooks up in his kitchen. “I trust him with the recipes," says Lee. "And we brainstorm about what we want to make.” Under normal circumstances, they might be traveling more to collaborate but shelter in place rules that out. Lee says it's a good thing they're comfortable working remotely. “If I never worked with him this wouldn't have been possible.”

As to the Asian-inspired flavors, “The beer market is very IPA dominant," says Lee, who wanted to make something unique. Weshnak stepped up to the challenge.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Start a New Year with an Enormous Challah

Posted By on Thu, Sep 17, 2020 at 4:09 PM

If you're like me, you want two things right now: bread and for this year to just be over.

Well, Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year begins on Friday, Sept. 18 at sundown, when people all over the world will celebrate the end of the Hebrew year 5780 and the start of 5781. Among the traditional holiday foods are rounds of challah bread, symbolic of the year, endless blessings and a crown recognizing God as king. (NPR has a great piece on challah and its many forms here.)
This is a big challah. But we believe in you. - COURTESY OF LOS BAGELS
  • Courtesy of Los Bagels
  • This is a big challah. But we believe in you.
In celebration, Los Bagels has rounds of challah — glossy and browned outside, egg-rich yellow and pillowy soft inside — in three sizes: 11 inches ($6), 18 inches ($25) and 24 inches ($30). If you're considering the big one, let me offer my support. Fresh challah is lightly sweet and utterly satisfying on its own, though impossible to refuse with a little jam and butter. Leftover, it makes for the most wonderful French toast and bread pudding.

If you're lucky enough to be with family, pulling a piece each from the round and sharing is exactly the comforting ritual for which the moment calls. It won't make 2020 or its calamities go any faster, but it might remind us, like the traditional Rosh Hashanah dish of apples dipped in honey, of the sweetness to be had in the future, and even now. Shanah tovah
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Saturday, September 5, 2020

Frankie's Develops a Sweet Tooth

Posted By on Sat, Sep 5, 2020 at 12:04 PM

Since shelter in place, Frankie Baker has scaled back. Where once a trio sliced and slung bagels in the Redwood Acres bakery, there's only Frankie's NY Bagels' namesake, baking and selling online orders for pick-up on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Now those orders include a shifting lineup of desserts.
Taste the rainbow cookies. - SUBMITTED
  • Submitted
  • Taste the rainbow cookies.
Painstaking Italian rainbow cookies ($2.50), the first cookie everybody snatches off the assorted tray from bakeries back East, are in the rotation. The stacked layers of almond-rich cake with jam in between and chocolate on top are originally Jewish and not really cookies, but that's what they're called. And as I've said before, cheesecake is pie and Boston cream pie is cake, so free yourself from arbitrary binary constructions. 

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Care2 Take Action?

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2021 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation