Thursday, May 26, 2016

Waiting for Tuesday

Posted By on Thu, May 26, 2016 at 2:45 PM

It's Tuesday so it must be Southern fried chicken. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • It's Tuesday so it must be Southern fried chicken.
Tuesdays are press days at the Journal, a cruel constant that has thus far kept us from following a lead on the Tuesday night Southern fried chicken special ($20) at Six Rivers Brewery (1300 Central Ave., McKinleyville). But this week, we put the issue to bed and called ahead to secure one of four remaining orders. By the time we hopped a stool, our neighbors at the bar were already loosened up and the Warriors were taking a beating on the flatscreens. 
Juicy inside, crunchy outside and gravy everywhere. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Juicy inside, crunchy outside and gravy everywhere.

Those same neighbors nodded knowingly when the huge square plate arrived covered in cream gravy, with a biscuit teetering on its edge. Instead of a hands-on leg and breast, this is a flattened, boneless full breast —resembling a deep-fried Pangaea — with a peppery, audibly crunchy crust that holds up under an avalanche of gravy. The coating is, as Elvis' cook used to say, "seasoned pretty high" and the marinated meat inside is juicy enough to make you forget about dark meat for a moment. Asked about the ingredients (is that cornmeal?) the cook replied, "just flour and egg wash." Lies. But we're not even mad. You will need your fork and the oversized knife — to cut, to share or to warn off the envious latecomers who didn't snap up those other three orders. Keep looking under that snowdrift spotted with cracked pepper and you'll find mashed potatoes (jackets on) and green beans slicked with butter. The homemade biscuit, though dwarfed by the tectonic plate of chicken, comes with a very southern foil-wrapped pat of butter and packet of honey so it doesn't forget where it came from. 




  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Saturday, May 21, 2016

The Small Things

Posted By on Sat, May 21, 2016 at 10:00 AM

Even if you don't, carnitas and pastor tacos deserve homemade tortillas. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Even if you don't, carnitas and pastor tacos deserve homemade tortillas.
We are not so much spoiled for choices as crushed by the never-ending waves of them. It never occurred to me as a child, for example, that I would one day find myself behind on watching TV. It is with the same Netflix-esque overwhelm that you sometimes open a Mexican menu, fold after fold, until the accordion of choices sends you seeking the refuge of your usual burrito. 

So the one-page, laminated menu at Taqueria Rosales (312 W. Washington St., Eureka), which has lately opened up behind Liu's, is a relief. There are still choices to be made about fillings for the half dozen regular items and the specials. The carnitas taco is little but mighty, with a homemade corn tortilla — oh, the softness — cilantro and onion ($2). Sure, you could go with a packaged tortilla for $.50 less, but is that who you are? Is that how you'd treat a friend, much less the salty, pan-crisped shreds of pork your server's mother made for this taco? Who hurt you?
Tangy, spicy short rib chile verde. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Tangy, spicy short rib chile verde.
Even plusher corn tortillas came wrapped in foil alongside the day's one and only special, short ribs stewed in a bright, tangy chile verde with a side of beans and rice ($10). Yes, short ribs — another little upgrade to treat yourself. The meat needs only a little coaxing to leave the bone and the seedy tomatillo and green chili sauce has just enough heat to give you some color. 
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Great Divides

Posted By on Wed, May 4, 2016 at 3:42 PM

A polenta dish we can all get behind. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • A polenta dish we can all get behind.

There are two factions of polenta lovers: those who want to dip their spoons into a bowl of golden creaminess and those who want to angle a fork through the browned, cheesy edges. Isn't our nation divided enough?

The polenta lasagna ($17) at Brick and Fire (1630 F St.) is a unifying force. True, it's not an actual lasagna — two seared rectangles of Parmesan-rich polenta sandwich roasted peppers, eggplant and mushrooms — and the roasted tomato compote is more intense than a traditional sauce, but go with it. Because the polenta, topped with shavings of still more Parmesan and a smattering of balsamic, is so very soft, enough to win over the spoon lobby without alienating the crust constituency.

You're going to need another reason not to share. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • You're going to need another reason not to share.
The kitchen staff is also uniting us on the chocolate cake vs. cheesecake front. The chocolate marscarpone cheesecake is a narrow wedge of the rich stuff ($7). It's milder than the straight cream cheese variety, with less of the distracting tang and all of the fluffiness. The balsamic glaze on the menu turns out to be but a streak, so if it puts you off, relax; if you want more, ask. There, a nation united, if only at lunch.
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Care2 Take Action?

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2021 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation