Friday, July 11, 2014

Frittered Away

Posted By on Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 11:17 AM

Fried, dark and handsome. - DREW HYLAND
  • Drew Hyland
  • Fried, dark and handsome.

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love the apple fritter at Happy Donuts ($2.75). Jane Austen would forgive me. After all, is this not the Mr. Darcy of doughnuts — Crusty and intimidating, a little puffed up and with no pleasing sprinkles. But the edges and imperfections of this great lump of a thing are encrusted with glaze and dotted with tiny, juicy bits of apple. It's not greasy and leaden, either, but browned and crispy. 

This enormous, landed cousin of the humble doughnut is a breakfast food, a dessert, an afternoon coffee treat and, if necessary, a kind of edible shield behind which you could hide your face if, like a moody hero, you were not feeling social. Sharing is probably wise, given the sheer mass of the fritter, but hangry people are not always wise. I'll just have a nibble, you think. Then you reach back into the bag and find it half empty. As Austen wrote of falling in love, "I was in the middle before I knew I had begun." 
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Saturday, July 5, 2014

Fo Schnitzel

Posted By on Sat, Jul 5, 2014 at 9:30 AM

Loosen your lederhosen — that's a lot of spaetzle. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Loosen your lederhosen — that's a lot of spaetzle.
Now that the US has been punted from the World Cup finals by Belgium, we could use a little comfort food. How about German? Too soon? Off to Stuf't Potato (if you haven't been, don't worry — it's not nearly as food-court as the name suggests) for German and Austrian soul food (3200 South Broadway, Eureka).

Schnitzel with a squeeze of lemon. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Schnitzel with a squeeze of lemon.
The Journal has received reliable intel regarding the weiner schnitzel, which sounds like sausage but is actually a pounded, breaded and fried pork cutlet ($11.25 a la carte). It's pinky-thin and tender, with a simple, crisp coating that's balanced by a squeeze of lemon and a dollop of cranberry preserve. On the side (yes, even a la cart) is more contrast in the form of a warm pile of pickley-sweet red cabbage. The fried potatoes are so perfectly browned and seasoned you will forget Americans put ketchup on them. A black pot full of fried spaetzle with a wooden stand showed up in front of the young man from Berlin at the next table ($7.95). I'll have what he's having. Buttery nubs of pasta pan fried with onion, parsley and gruyere cheese and topped with frizzled onion comes off  like a none-too-salty Teutonic mac and cheese. It's rustic and satisfying with the earthy and aromatic gruyere. As you dig into your own little cauldron, you might wonder why the Italians spend so much time turning pasta into fancy shapes.

This is why streudel is one of Julie Andrews' favorite things. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • This is why streudel is one of Julie Andrews' favorite things.
The Berliner recommends the Viennese apple streudel, which arrives hot and dusted with powdered sugar — don't blow on it or you'll cover everyone at your table ($3.95). The crust is soft and flaky on top, caramelized on the bottom and stuffed in the middle with firm, cinnamon spiced apples. Hell, ja


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