Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Party for the Parks

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2016 at 11:39 AM

Landon Porter, 7, Crescent City, enjoyed the horseback rides offered by Hailey Ford, McKinleyville and the Redwood Creek Buckarettes. The group offers guided tours in Redwood National Park. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • Landon Porter, 7, Crescent City, enjoyed the horseback rides offered by Hailey Ford, McKinleyville and the Redwood Creek Buckarettes. The group offers guided tours in Redwood National Park.

The former log deck of the California Redwood Company located just north of Orick, once covered with stacks of huge old-growth redwood logs, was filled on Sunday with the vehicles of visitors arriving for the 2016 National Park Service’s Centennial Celebration in the Redwoods.

Dale Webster, a Redwood National Park employee and Yurok tribal member, displayed several of his handcrafted traditional items. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • Dale Webster, a Redwood National Park employee and Yurok tribal member, displayed several of his handcrafted traditional items.

Activities included horseback riding, hiking to the nearby Centennial Tree, storytelling, eating the submissions in the redwood forest cake contest, enjoying live music, participating in Junior Ranger activities and exploring a wide mix of exhibits and food vendors.

Michael Muir, Napa, the great-grandson of conservationist John Muir and one of the guest speakers, described the the National Park Service  Centennial as a "grand event." - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • Michael Muir, Napa, the great-grandson of conservationist John Muir and one of the guest speakers, described the the National Park Service Centennial as a "grand event."

John Muir’s great-grandson Michael Muir, of Napa, spoke at the Centennial event along with Sam Hodder of Save the Redwoods League and Congressman Jared Huffman. The Save the Redwoods League recently announced a plan to build a new visitor center on the former site of California Redwood Company.

One of the more popular activities was cutting a round with a two-handled saw from "second-growth redwood, obviously!", according to Megan Boyle, 9, Havre, Montana. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • One of the more popular activities was cutting a round with a two-handled saw from "second-growth redwood, obviously!", according to Megan Boyle, 9, Havre, Montana.

The 100th birthday of the N.P.S. was celebrated even though Yellowstone National Park and others were created decades earlier. Stephen Prokop, superintendent of Redwood National Park, attributed the vision of national park system to Stephen Mather and the Scottish-American conservationist John Muir.

A woven basket used to catch Pacific lamprey, commonly called eels, was one of many items displayed at an exhibit of Yurok traditions. Eels enter the Klamath River to spawn and are part of the Yurok seasonal diet. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • A woven basket used to catch Pacific lamprey, commonly called eels, was one of many items displayed at an exhibit of Yurok traditions. Eels enter the Klamath River to spawn and are part of the Yurok seasonal diet.

Redwood National Park was formed in 1968 and expanded in 1978. Prokop described the cooperative management of the Redwood National and State Parks with local Native American tribes, including the Yurok, Tolowa-Dee-Ni, and Elk Valley Rancheria.

Dave Van de Mark, Trinidad, displayed maps and photographs and shared stories of the efforts made by Lucille Vinyard, himself and many others to lobby for first the creation of Redwood National Park in 1968 and then its eventual expansion in 1978. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • Dave Van de Mark, Trinidad, displayed maps and photographs and shared stories of the efforts made by Lucille Vinyard, himself and many others to lobby for first the creation of Redwood National Park in 1968 and then its eventual expansion in 1978.

Many of the visitors at the event stopped by a table to "Send a Postcard to the Future." Displayed during the event, they will be shown at a later date in the R.N.P. visitor center. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • Many of the visitors at the event stopped by a table to "Send a Postcard to the Future." Displayed during the event, they will be shown at a later date in the R.N.P. visitor center.


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Friday, June 24, 2016

Fried Chicken for the Soul

Posted By on Fri, Jun 24, 2016 at 8:00 AM

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Everything's better over a plate of hot, delicious food, isn't it? Strangers become friends around the table. Barriers melt away like pats of butter on warm, squares of golden cornbread. Breaking bread is a healing act and definitely what the world needs now. Join the Eureka Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) at the 46th annual Charles Washington Soul Food Dinner on Saturday, June 25, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Eureka Women's Club ($20, $10 for kids under 12). Fill your belly and warm your spirit with a plate of traditional soul food: fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, collard greens, black eyed peas, cornbread and candied yams. They're not fooling around. Thankfully, DJ L Boogie of KHUM will bring the beats so you can shake some of it off before dessert.

The event was named in honor of the late Charles Washington, an early leader in the local NAACP branch, which was founded in 1952. Donations from the dinner help the local branch further the mission of the NAACP, which is to ensure the political, educational, social and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate race-based discrimination. Sounds damn good to us.


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Thursday, June 23, 2016

Step Right Up

Posted By on Thu, Jun 23, 2016 at 8:00 AM

MILES EGGLESTON
  • Miles Eggleston

The season of the fair — with fried-food smells, swirling rides and blue-ribbon goods — is here. The Best of Humboldt Fair, the first of the summer, spins its Ferris wheel high in the sky and welcomes families through the gates at Redwood Acres Fairgrounds June 23 through June 26 for four days of arts, entertainment, agriculture and more ($12 adults, $5 seniors and kids 6 to 12, free for active military and kids under 6).

There's something for everyone this year, from the NASCAR Experience to the quilt and flower show to the Exceptional Rodeo to local products and animals large and small in the livestock barn. Family entertainment includes big top circus fun with juggling, stilt walking and clowning around courtesy of the Jest in Time Circus. Nature Joe's back with his furry and feathered Animal Exhibit, and if you dare, take A Walk on the Wild Side for critters with a bigger bite. Steve the Pretty Good Magician has a few scarves up his sleeve and Karen Quest, recently at Mad River Festival, performs whip-crackin' cow girl tricks. Kids wearing the coveted carnival wristband ($30) can ride all the rides their little corn dog and cotton candy-filled stomachs can handle. And, of course, no fair would be complete without food, food, food and lots of live music.


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Sunday, June 19, 2016

Oyster Fest 2016

Posted By on Sun, Jun 19, 2016 at 6:56 PM

Shelling out the good stuff at the 26th annual Arcata Bay Oyster Festival. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • Shelling out the good stuff at the 26th annual Arcata Bay Oyster Festival.

How is everybody feeling today? If you were at the 26th annual Arcata Bay Oyster Festival yesterday you might be a little wobbly, a little sunburned, a little tired — maybe all of the above. The sun was out and so was Humboldt (along with a hearty crowd of out-of-towners), reveling in the fruit of our bay, the oyster. The taps were flowing, the bands were playing and patrons were lined up at stalls and slurping down oysters as fast as vendors could shuck them. In a history-making trifecta, Sushi Spot swept all culinary competition categories: Best Raw Oyster, Best Cooked Oyster and Best Non-oyster entry. We'll have to wait for next year to see if the restaurant can defend all three titles, and we may need that time to fully recover anyway. Until then, enjoy photographer Mark McKenna's slideshow of the briny bacchanalia. 


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Friday, June 17, 2016

Keeping up with the Kumamotos

Posted By on Fri, Jun 17, 2016 at 8:00 AM

FILE
  • File

Consider the virtues of our local celebrities: Cultivating oysters improves our oceans and its flora and fauna. Their ground shells boost your victory garden. They produce the preferred jewelry of Audrey Hepburn. Without a central nervous system, oysters are likely feeling no more pain than you after those festival drink tokens are spent. The little shuckers are also plump with omega-3 fatty acids, zinc and protein. And unlike that righteously austere plate of zoodles, they taste marvelous.

Lucky for us we live in a hotbed of oyster beds. Revel in your good fortune on Saturday, June 18, at the 26th annual Arcata Oyster Festival from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (free entry). An army of vendors will be shelling out bivalve delights from shooters to tacos, as well as land-locked goodies, beer and wine (taps open from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., so plan your queue-up and sober ride).

Between the noon oyster calling contest, the Shuck and Swallow race at 2 p.m. and Fred Oystaire's announcement of the Best Raw, Best Cooked and Best Non-oyster winners at 3:45 p.m., there'll be a bevy of musical acts. DJ Stir-fry Willie, The Honky Tonk Detours, Absynth Quartet, Naïve Melodies and Dynasty One are all taking turns on the stage. Kids can hit the FLUPSY, or oyster nursery area, for pint-sized entertainment like puppetry, balloon animals, free ice cream and more. Shells, yeah.


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Thursday, June 16, 2016

You Mad, Brah?

Posted By on Thu, Jun 16, 2016 at 8:00 AM

Photo by Terrence McNally
  • Photo by Terrence McNally

Dell'Arte's 26th annual Mad River Festival, running June 16 through July 17, is a month-long romp in the Blue Lake sunshine featuring theatrical thrills, foot tapping music and loads of family fun with larger-than-life puppets and performances to dazzle the young and young at heart. This year's festival is centered on Dell'Arte's current initiative "The River, Our Home," which looks at local watersheds and our relationships with them. Following that theme, the main stage show this summer is The Big Thirst, a comic musical mystery tour that seeks to discover what's happened to a disappearing precious resource. It premieres June 16 at 8 p.m. at the Rooney Amphitheater ($18, $15, $10) and plays through July 3. Other festival highlights in June include the Big Top Family Series: Cowgirl Tricks with "America's funniest cowgirl" Karen Quest trick roping and whip cracking her way around the Pierson Big Top Hammer Circus Tent, June 19 and 26 at 2 p.m. ($10, $5), and Mad Lab, an evening of edgy, experimental works on June 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the Carlo Theatre (donation).

In July, the festival plays on with Eureka Symphony's: Peter and the Wolf and Instrument Petting Zoo, the racy Red Light in Blue Lake: Adult Cabaret, Humboldt Folklife Festival, a free all-day festival in downtown Blue Lake and more. Visit www.dellarte.com for a full schedule of events and ticket information.


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Saturday, June 11, 2016

Sunday in the Park with Wine

Posted By on Sat, Jun 11, 2016 at 8:00 AM

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Summer's here and it seems like everything is happening "in the park" or "by the bay." Not that we're complaining. If you enjoy the sound of a cork popping followed by the splash of a little class hitting your glass, then there's one "in the park" event you don't want to miss. Fortuna Rotary Club's annual Art & Wine in the Park on Sunday, June 12 from noon to 4 p.m. at Rohner Park (free admission, $25 tasting glass), is an afternoon of the finer things in life: wine, cheese, art, music and food. There's Chardonnay to sip and sherry to swirl from local, regional and California wineries.

The event, now in its 27th year, features the popular Wine Tasting School where you can refine your palate to an estimable level of snoot. You can also try your luck at taking home a sweet (or dry) prize from the wine raffle, peruse the arts and crafts booths, and pair your drink perfectly at the food booth with Humboldt Bay Oysters and strawberries or heartier fare like burgers and pulled pork sandwiches. And no "in the park" festival would be complete without live music. The Delta Nationals keep things rockin' all afternoon to help you go with the flow.



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Thursday, June 9, 2016

Tales of the City

Posted By on Thu, Jun 9, 2016 at 8:00 AM

COURTESY OF THE HUMBOLDT HISTORICAL SOCIETY
  • Courtesy of the Humboldt Historical Society

Ever wonder what went on behind closed doors in some of your favorite Old Town haunts? Eureka is steeped in colorful history; find it at the Humboldt County Historical Society's Raise the Roof: Tales of Old Town, a fundraiser with dinner, music, cocktails and a peek into yesteryear this Friday, June 10 at 6 p.m. at the Eagle House Victorian Inn ($75).

Local historian Alex Service has the scoop on who's who from Humboldt's heyday. Hear tawdry tales about Eureka's infamous nightlife from the 1860s to 1930s. Back then, instead of coffee shops and bookstores, Old Town had 32 brothels and 65 saloons, including the Glo Room at the Hotel Monte Carlo, where torch singer Margaret "Muzzy" Paul sang. Vocal artist Claire Bent and her band the Lonesome Sunday Quartet will bring the 1940s to life in a tribute to Paul, known as "The Last of the Red Hot Mamas."

Feast on salmon or prime rib and hear tales of the area's wilder times courtesy of longtime residents Evo Fanucchi, Laurie Lazio and Bill Williams. Money raised from the event goes to a new roof over the Humboldt County Historical Society's digs, the historic Barnum House. Tip your bartender.


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Friday, June 3, 2016

Come on In, the Art is Fine

Posted By on Fri, Jun 3, 2016 at 8:00 AM

PHOTO BY MONICA TOPPING
  • Photo by Monica Topping

The North Coast is a vibrant stretch of land, bursting with originals and originators. The salt air, natural beauty, friendly folk and easygoing pace surely serve our ability to recognize and unleash our creative power. And fortunately, North Coast Open Studios, the two-weekend, community art event, affords us a rare opportunity to step into the places where that creativity blooms. We get to talk with artists, watch them work, see what inspires them and perhaps pick up a few ideas for our own practices (or, pick up a few pieces for our collections).

The annual event, now in its 18th year, includes open studio locations from Trinidad to Hydesville and east to Blue Lake. It showcases more than 100 artists and artisans. And this year, for connoisseurs of fine fermentation, local cider and wine makers will open their doors for a peek into the processes.

Studios are open this Saturday and Sunday, June 4 and 5 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and next weekend, June 11 and 12 (free), same time.

To find out where your favorite creator is located, or to double check the rare exception to the open studio times, look for guidebooks around the county, online at www.northcoastjournal.com or in the May 26 issue of the Journal.


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SoHum Sunshine

Posted By on Fri, Jun 3, 2016 at 12:00 AM

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The Summer Arts & Music Festival, June 4 and 5 at the Benbow Lake State Recreation Area ($40 weekend pass, $25 per day), billed as "the most comprehensive celebration of art and music on the North Coast" and voted 2015's "Best Music Festival in Humboldt County" by you, dear NCJ readers, is the perfect way to get that sweet summer vibe going.

One of the best bangs for your musical buck, the SAMF presents more than 100 performances by a diverse array of entertainers. Headliners this year include John Popper (of Blues Traveler fame) with Object Heavy & DJ Logic, March Fourth! Marching Band, The Skints and Dehli 2 Dublin, to name just a few. In addition to the imports, you can groove to a multitude of local favorites. Catch the Latin Peppers, NightHawk, April Moore and Ranch Party, Mad River Rose, No Pardon, Asha Nan, Absynth Quartet and a host of others.

As the festival's title indicates, there's plenty of art to behold against the backdrop of the river and redwoods. From the Fine Arts Showcase to the Belly Dance Temple to homemade art, food and information booths to a lively Kids Zone, there's much to enjoy, and all-day/night to do it. Gates open at 9:30 a.m. with the party going from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m. both days.


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