Friday, February 17, 2017

Ready for Primetime

Posted By on Fri, Feb 17, 2017 at 10:59 AM

award_westminster_.png

Amid all the wagging cuteness and elegance on display at the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show last week, a local pup turned some heads.

More Than Ready, an Irish setter owned by Fortuna’s Tom and Anita Gage that came into the competition ranked 18th in the nation for owner handler dogs, took home a prestigious Award of Merit in the Irish setter best of breed competition. The award is a big win for the Gages and caught the notice of The New Yorker reporter Jia Tolentino. Anyone who took a class from Tom Gage, a retired Humboldt State Univeristy English professor, should recognize him in Tolentino’s depiction:
"Applause rang out; a breed competition had just concluded. A woman in a pink suit ran to greet her husband with brimming, joyful eyes. Her name was Anita Gage, and her Irish setter, Ready—official name: More Than Ready—had just won an Award of Merit. She and her husband, Tom, had travelled for fifteen hours to get to New York from California. Tom, an English professor, told me later, “The beauty of the Irish setter has caught the eye of painters for centuries.” Somehow, we got on the subject of Turkish politics, and for the rest of the dog show, as handlers napped in camping chairs and the animals lined up, Noah’s Ark style, to exit through the loading dock, the two of us talked about Fethullah Gülen."

Check out Tolentino’s full article here, and watch Anita Gage and Ready in action below. (Anita is the handler in pink wearing the No. 10 arm band.)


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Thursday, February 16, 2017

Attack of the English Ivy

Posted By on Thu, Feb 16, 2017 at 3:24 PM

Conservation groups point to the fact that invasive English Ivy poses a risk to redwoods in arguing for banning sales of the plant in California. - FILE
  • FILE
  • Conservation groups point to the fact that invasive English Ivy poses a risk to redwoods in arguing for banning sales of the plant in California.

A number of conservation groups, government branches and a logging company petitioned for a ban of selling English Ivy in California. Over 20 organizations, including the Environmental Protection Information Center and Green Diamond Resource Co., led a petition to designate English Ivy as a noxious plant.


Tom Wheeler, Executive Director of Environmental Protection Information Center, said the Ivy is harmful to North Coast forests. The sale is already prohibited in Oregon and Washington, and it’s time for California to join their North Coast neighbors.


“English Ivy is a very destructive and invasive species on the North Coast,” Wheeler said. “It’s a direct threat to our most iconic species [the Redwood] but also other vegetation as well.”


English Ivy is not a native species, it was brought over from European settlers as ornamental plant, but has since spread throughout public lands. Because the plant is not indigenous to the North Coast, it out competes the plants like Salal and Huckleberries, which are indigenous to this area.



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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Food Sovereignty, Tribal Sovereignty

Posted By on Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Potawot Community Garden farm stand. - COURTESY OF POTAWOT COMMUNITY GARDEN, UIHS
  • Courtesy of Potawot Community Garden, UIHS
  • Potawot Community Garden farm stand.
When the Northern California Tribal Courts Coalition (NCTCC) was awarded a grant to improve tribal health last year, it didn’t hesitate in identifying food as the keystone. Spearheaded by Program Director Cynthia Boshell, NCTCC will roll out its first Tribal Youth Food Sovereignty Camps later this month. The all-day camps will consist of hands-on education, discussion and participation in growing and cooking native foods. In order to serve youth on the coast and inland, the camp will be repeated on consecutive days: Wednesday, Feb. 22 in Potawot; Thursday, Feb. 23 in Klamath and Friday, Feb. 24 in Orleans.

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Monday, February 13, 2017

Eureka Rallies Behind Planned Parenthood

Posted By on Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 1:37 PM

A crowd of more than 200 pro-choice and pro-Planned Parenthood supporters carry signs, chant and wave to passing drivers on Fifth Street outside the Humboldt County Courthouse on Saturday afternoon. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • A crowd of more than 200 pro-choice and pro-Planned Parenthood supporters carry signs, chant and wave to passing drivers on Fifth Street outside the Humboldt County Courthouse on Saturday afternoon.

The Humboldt County Courthouse lawn was filled Saturday with more than 200 people waving signs and chanting in a show of support for Planned Parenthood, which has come under threat with the new administration and Congress. Many passing motorists honked and waved in shows of support, though some offered a thumbs-down condemnation. Local photographer Mark Larson was there and shared the following slideshow.

Slideshow
Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally
Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally

Eureka Planned Parenthood Rally


By Mark Larson

Click to View 16 slides


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Sunday, February 12, 2017

HumBug: Winter Pygmies

Posted By on Sun, Feb 12, 2017 at 3:00 PM

A 1/2-inch grouse locust on my garage door. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • A 1/2-inch grouse locust on my garage door.

Today, on the front garage door was the tiniest grasshopper you are ever likely to see, its body measuring about ½ inch long. Its general body shape, short antennae, and large hind legs, were unmistakably those of a grasshopper (sub order Caelifera). Its size, coloration and the fact that it was out in the middle of winter told me it was a member of the Tetrigidae family or grouse locusts also known as pygmy grasshoppers. Both regular grasshoppers and their pygmy cousins are members of the order Orthoptera, which also includes crickets, camel crickets, Jerusalem crickets and katydids (all of which have long antennae).

A 1-inch shield backed katydid. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • A 1-inch shield backed katydid.
Unlike most other grasshopper families, adults of this group are known to survive through winter. During the summer I've seen many of these tiny hoppers along river bars, where they feed on algae on rocks. With the river swollen from recent rains, I guess they've headed for higher ground. This is the third one I've seen lately at my house which is about half a mile from the nearest river.
An immature katydid (about  3/4 inch long) eating one of my roses. - ANTHONY WESTKAMPER
  • Anthony Westkamper
  • An immature katydid (about 3/4 inch long) eating one of my roses.

Once I get my fly tying paraphernalia back together I may try to imitate these. Since they live so near the water, the fish may well see them as a tasty and familiar morsel.



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Saturday, February 11, 2017

Journal News Editor Wins Freedom of Information Award

Posted By on Sat, Feb 11, 2017 at 10:51 AM

THADEUS GREENSON
  • Thadeus Greenson

The Society of Professional Journalists Northern California officially announced yesterday that Thadeus Greenson, the Journal's news editor, won a James Madison Freedom of Information Award. It's an award Caroline Titus of the Ferndale Enterprise took home in 2016, and the Journal's then staff writer and editor Hank Sims and Emily Gurnon won in 2005.

Greenson is being recognized for his "years long battle with the city of Eureka over the release of police camera footage of an arrest." (That arrest by then Eureka Police Sgt. Adam Laird and the departmental drama that followed it are, coincidentally, the subject of next week's cover story on stands Wednesday.) The end result of Greenson and the Journal's pursuit of the video, in Humboldt County Superior Court and then in the California First District Court of Appeals, was a state precedent-setting opinion that kept the city — and any others in California — from treating police camera footage as confidential officer personnel records.

Particularly in our current climate, with heightened awareness of police misconduct and the potential abuses of power, that ruling in favor of transparency is a win for journalists throughout the state, the public and those police departments working toward trust in the communities they protect. We could not be more proud of Greenson's work on this story and in every issue of the Journal.


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Friday, February 10, 2017

Building a More Inclusive University

Posted By on Fri, Feb 10, 2017 at 2:29 PM

FILE
  • File
Richard Boone walked back and fourth in front of a group of campus community members who gathered in Humboldt State University’s Goodwin Forum on Thursday. Behind Boone, the university’s dean of natural resources and sciences, was a large projection screen that read, “Campus wide discussions: Inequalities, justice and inclusion.”

Boone, who was recently appointed to his post in July of 2016, led the discussion on creating a more inclusive and safer campus community. All students, staff, faculty and administrators were invited to have a dialogue on how the school can be more inclusive to undocumented students, people of color and the LGBTQ community.

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Thursday, February 9, 2017

Downey Set to Retire in May

Posted By on Thu, Feb 9, 2017 at 2:05 PM

Sheriff Mike Downey - COURTESY OF THE SHERIFF'S OFFICE
  • Courtesy of the sheriff's office
  • Sheriff Mike Downey
Humboldt County Sheriff Mike Downey is stepping down from his elected office in May.

In a brief press release making the announcement today, the county said Downey, who was first elected in June of 2010, “is humbled and honored to have served as the Sheriff of Humboldt County for the last 6 years.”

Downey’s term is up in 2018. He ran unopposed in 2014.

While the release didn’t outline the process for his replacement, the county Board of Supervisors will now need to decide whether to appoint someone to serve the remainder of Downey's term or call a special election.

Read the full release from the county of Humboldt below:
Sheriff Michael Downey would like to take the opportunity to inform the citizens of Humboldt County of his intent to retire as Sheriff of the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, effective Saturday, May 6, 2017.
Sheriff Downey stated this decision has been the most difficult he has had to make in his 31 plus years as a member and Sheriff of the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff Downey is humbled and honored to have served as the Sheriff of Humboldt County for the last 6 years.    

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Federal Court Rules in Favor of Salmon

Posted By on Thu, Feb 9, 2017 at 11:21 AM

A coho salmon carcass observed during a spawner survey, in which dead adult fish and salmon nests, or redds, are assessed. - PHOTO COURTESY OF BOB PAGLIUCO
  • Photo courtesy of Bob Pagliuco
  • A coho salmon carcass observed during a spawner survey, in which dead adult fish and salmon nests, or redds, are assessed.
A U.S. District Court judge has sided with those trying to protect coho salmon in the Klamath River, ruling yesterday that the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the National Marine Fisheries Service must release more water from the Klamath dams. The release of the water is intended to mitigate the death of coho from a parasite,Ceratanova shasta, which causes cell decay in intestinal tissue, severe inflammation and death. Large percentages of the endangered species died from infection in 2014 and 2015, a phenomenon fisheries experts have blamed on low river flows and warm water, where the parasite thrives.

Judge William H. Orrick ruled that the Bureau had mismanaged the river, causing "irreparable" harm to the salmon. The Hoopa and Yurok tribes filed two different suits in 2016 alleging that the government had failed to adhere to the Endangered Species Act as it did not commit to mitigation measures when it became clear that low flows and warm water were causing immense salmon die-offs, impacting the long-term health of the species and the ability of the tribes to continue traditional fisheries practices.

The court has ordered the Bureau to release "flushing flows" of water in the winter and early spring that should flush out C. shasta worms. Additional mitigation measures will also be taken.

The legal decision is being hailed as an important first step as tribes and other groups work to remove the remaining dams on the Klamath.

Reached by phone this morning, Konrad Fisher of the Klamath Riverkeeper said his group was pleased with the judge's decision, but more work remained.

"This litigation was specifically about disease management, ultimately we need to not only manage disease but restore populations," he said.

In a press release, Thomas P. O'Rourke Sr., chairman of the Yuroke tribe, said that the ruling will give the salmon a "fighting chance until we can get the lower four dams out."

Louis Moore, of the Bureau of Reclamation's Sacramento office, stated that the agency was reviewing the court decision to "assess what it really means," adding that the the Bureau "always complies with the law."


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Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Customers Rally Behind El Pueblo Market Hit by Fire

Posted By on Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 5:14 PM

Customers took to Facebook to show support for the El Pueblo Market, which was destroyed in an early morning fire. The store was known for its authentic Mexican pastries. - JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL
  • Jennifer Fumiko Cahill
  • Customers took to Facebook to show support for the El Pueblo Market, which was destroyed in an early morning fire. The store was known for its authentic Mexican pastries.
Traffic was snarled along Broadway in Eureka for several hours this morning as 30 firefighters battled a massive fire that destroyed the El Pueblo Market, which was known for its authentic Mexican pastries and other traditional foods.

No one was injured in the early morning blaze, which caused an estimated $750,000 in damage to the store. The cause of the fire is under investigation, according to a Humboldt Bay Fire release. Crews were still at the scene this afternoon working with the Humboldt County Arson Task Force to determine the fire's origin.

Several customers took to El Pueblo’s Facebook page to offer their sympathies and let the owners know they are behind the business that started in 1993.

‎ “I am sorry for your loss and Eureka's. I have wanted to stop and buy pan dulce. I will drop by when you rebuild,” Laura Eaton Zerzan Jones wrote on the El Pueblo Market page.

Another, by Heather Bergen, read: “So sad to learn what happened to your business. Hope you are back in business soon. Thank you for being a part of our community.”

The fire came on top of what was already a difficult start to the week for the business. According to the Eureka Police Department, officers responded to the store on Monday and Tuesday due to break-ins.

Read the Humboldt Bay Fire release below:

At approximately 5:30am on February 8th Humboldt Bay Fire was dispatched to a structure fire at 3600 Broadway Avenue with smoke coming from the building. The initial dispatch included two duty Chiefs, a squad, two engines and a truck. The first arriving unit reported heavy smoke visible from the door of a commercial market.

Units set up for fire attack and deployed multiple lines to attack the fire. A primary search was conducted to determine if any occupants were inside the building. The tiller ladder truck was set up to access the roof and coordinate venting the heat, smoke and gases from the interior. A second alarm was requested to move another HBF unit to the fire scene and an Arcata Fire Protection District engine into Eureka to assist in coverage. Fire conditions rapidly changed and it was apparent this was a well-established fire toward the rear of the building. Interior access was very difficult. A commercial second alarm was called for to bring in another engine and truck from mutual aid agencies.

Smoke conditions changed rapidly and indicated a deterioration of interior conditions, accompanied by fire ventilating through the roof away from ventilation crews. All units were removed from the interior of the building to attack the fire from the exterior in case of structural collapse and significantly high heat and no visibility.

Additional fire apparatus from Arcata and Fortuna responded to the scene to assist with water supply and attacking the fire. Samoa Fire units provided station coverage to maintain emergency response services to the Eureka area. The fire was controlled after approximately two hours with areas still actively burning due to collapsed structural members and debris. Crews are still on scene overhauling the fire and investigating the cause and origin working with the Humboldt County Arson Task Force. A total of 30 firefighters from four agencies operated on the fire scene, and several more provided station coverage.

Property damage is estimated at $750,000 as the building and contents are a total loss. Adjoining occupancies were not directly damaged by the fire but did require assistance in smoke removal.

No injuries to occupants or firefighters were reported.

Rapidly growing fires can occur in any structure at any time of day or night due to accidents, negligence or gross disregard for the safety of others. Working alarm and suppression systems including fire alarms and sprinkler systems are a great benefit to individuals, businesses and the community as they protect property, contents and assets. Please call 441-4000 to learn more!


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