Medical / Health

Friday, March 24, 2017

Huffman Celebrates Failure of TrumpCare

Posted By on Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 3:41 PM

Huffman - FILE
  • File
  • Huffman
Rep. Jared Huffman issued a press release this afternoon in response to the failure of Republicans to bring the so-called "TrumpCare" bill to a vote. President Donald Trump, who ran on a platform of repealing the Affordable Care Act, indicated today that he would consider drafting a new bill once the ACA "explodes." The Republican healthcare replacement plan was predicted to cost millions of people their health insurance. Huffman, a vocal and vigorous critic of the Trump administration, said the collapse of the plan represented a "tremendous victory." Read his full statement below.


Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Eureka Rehabilitation and Wellness Center Fined $160,000 by State

Posted By on Wed, Mar 1, 2017 at 3:48 PM

David Brodsky with his mother, Marie White. - PHOTO BY LINDA STANSBERRY
  • Photo by Linda Stansberry
  • David Brodsky with his mother, Marie White.
Eureka Rehabilitation Center, one of the four skilled nursing facilities in Humboldt County owned by Brius Healthcare, was hit with eight fines yesterday at $20,000 each.
The facility, which was visited by state inspectors in December, has been dogged by allegations of understaffing and improper patient care. It was one of three facilities slated for closure last year as the Brius and its local administrative branch, Rockport Healthcare Services, negotiated for an increase in MediCal reimbursement rates with the region's distributor, Partnership Healthcare Services. Brius, a healthcare giant that has a virtual monopoly on skilled nursing care in Humboldt County, ended up closing only one of its facilities, Pacific Rehabilitation and Wellness Center.

The state's inspection seems to confirm that this facility was, despite the insistence of Brius representatives to the contrary, understaffed. The California Department of Public Health has not provided the Journal with a manifest of the incidents that led to the fines, but the incident codes associated with each penalty, as found on the website for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, reveal a pattern of poor patient care.

One $20,000 fine corresponds to a failure of the facility to provide the "necessary care for highest practicable well being," which means residents are not being cared for in accordance with a "comprehensive assessment and plan of care."

Another fine was levied due to the facility failing to meet federal guidelines for "sufficient staff to meet the needs of resident[s]." The facility was also found not to have "an appropriately functioning [Quality Assessment and Assurance] committee," according to the description of the violation code on the CMS website.

And Eureka Rehabilitation and Wellness Center was fined five separate times, at $20,000 each, under violation code F323, the statute that requires administrators "make sure that the nursing home area is free of dangers that cause accidents."

The son of a former patient at Eureka, David Brodsky, complained to the Journal last year that lack of adequate staff and an unsafe environment contributed to his mother's fall and her placement on hospice care in August 2016. He said he had spoke with the administration and lodged a complaint with the state, but the CDPH website says that none of the five fines for safety violations were associated with complaints, meaning that investigators may have independently found hazards at the facility unrelated to the complaints of Brodsky and others. The CDPH did substantiate five complaints at the facility in 2016 related to quality of patient care, violations of discharge and transfer rights and mental abuse.

Granada Rehabilitation and Wellness Center was also hit with state enforcement actions and has been asked to pay $4,000 for two separate incidents of failing to self-report abuse.

When the potential closures were first announced, the company blamed the high cost of bringing in registry nurses from out of the area for an alleged fiscal shortfall of $5 million. The company insisted that without a hike in reimbursements, it could not pay a competitive wage that would attract qualified staff in Humboldt County, where there is a shortage of nursing personnel. The company also blamed the region's marijuana industry for diverting staff away from its facilities.

On Sept. 8, Vincent Hambright, Rockport's CEO, told a group of worried seniors and their family members at Eureka Rehabilitation and Wellness Center that, should they have to leave the facility they had come to think of as home, the company would do  everything in its power to make them comfortable and see them properly accommodated. Advocates argued that the threat of closure was a venal power move by the company, one that would endanger the lives of hundreds of current and future patients who would have to travel hundreds of miles out of the area to find skilled nursing beds. Hambright insisted the company was suffering an unsustainable loss due to importing staff. When family members and patients insisted that the facility was understaffed despite this expense, citing conversations with overworked nursing assistants and problems with improper wound care, Hambright shot back that this was absolutely untrue.

But one former staff member at Eureka Rehabilitation and Wellness Center called its understaffing "a nightmare," and said patients were "covered in feces" and suffering falls, especially during the night. And the company's own financial records revealed that, collectively, the five Humboldt facilities sent close to $5 million back into the coffers of companies owned or associated with its owner, Los Angeles-based billionaire Shlomo Rechnitz.

According to research conducted by the National Union of Healthcare Workers, financial penalties do not seem to be a significant motivator for facilities to improve care. Many fines are whittled down to a smaller number in litigation or dismissed entirely. Medicaid covers the cost for skilled nursing facility chains to challenge fees in court, according to advocates, which creates a disincentive for the state to pursue litigation.

The NUHW's research revealed that in the past three years, the state dismissed $23,000 of the $60,000 in penalties levied against Brius holdings in Humboldt County. According to a report In 2014  the company that brought in $77 million in profits from its California facilities, according to a report filed with the California Attorney General's Office.




  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , ,

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Settlement Next Step in Magney End-of-Life Care Case

Posted By on Tue, Feb 28, 2017 at 9:00 AM

Dick and Judy Magney around the time they met in 1992 - PHOTO COURTESY OF JUDY MAGNEY
  • Photo courtesy of Judy Magney
  • Dick and Judy Magney around the time they met in 1992
A scathing appellate ruling that found officials with the county of Humboldt overstepped their bounds and misrepresented evidence to the court when they interfered in a Carlotta couple’s end-of-life medical decisions became final yesterday.

That sets the stage for attorney Allison Jackson, who represented Dick and Judy Magney in the case, to begin settlement talks — a process that she said will start with a letter being sent to the board of supervisors this week “in order for them to understand the gravity and significance of this decision.”

Almost exactly two years have passed since Adult Protective Services began a March 2015 investigation into never pursued or substantiated reports of possible caretaker neglect after Dick Magney — then 73 and in failing health — was admitted to the hospital.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Food Sovereignty, Tribal Sovereignty

Posted By on Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Potawot Community Garden farm stand. - COURTESY OF POTAWOT COMMUNITY GARDEN, UIHS
  • Courtesy of Potawot Community Garden, UIHS
  • Potawot Community Garden farm stand.
When the Northern California Tribal Courts Coalition (NCTCC) was awarded a grant to improve tribal health last year, it didn’t hesitate in identifying food as the keystone. Spearheaded by Program Director Cynthia Boshell, NCTCC will roll out its first Tribal Youth Food Sovereignty Camps later this month. The all-day camps will consist of hands-on education, discussion and participation in growing and cooking native foods. In order to serve youth on the coast and inland, the camp will be repeated on consecutive days: Wednesday, Feb. 22 in Potawot; Thursday, Feb. 23 in Klamath and Friday, Feb. 24 in Orleans.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, February 13, 2017

Eureka Rallies Behind Planned Parenthood

Posted By on Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at 1:37 PM

A crowd of more than 200 pro-choice and pro-Planned Parenthood supporters carry signs, chant and wave to passing drivers on Fifth Street outside the Humboldt County Courthouse on Saturday afternoon. - MARK LARSON
  • Mark Larson
  • A crowd of more than 200 pro-choice and pro-Planned Parenthood supporters carry signs, chant and wave to passing drivers on Fifth Street outside the Humboldt County Courthouse on Saturday afternoon.

The Humboldt County Courthouse lawn was filled Saturday with more than 200 people waving signs and chanting in a show of support for Planned Parenthood, which has come under threat with the new administration and Congress. Many passing motorists honked and waved in shows of support, though some offered a thumbs-down condemnation. Local photographer Mark Larson was there and shared the following slideshow.


  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

With the Flu Season Here, There's Still Time to Vaccinate

Posted By on Tue, Jan 17, 2017 at 1:46 PM

Public health officials say there's still time to get a flu shot. - FILE PHOTO
  • File photo
  • Public health officials say there's still time to get a flu shot.
There’s good and bad news about this year’s flu season. The bad news: It’s here. The good news: The current shot is a close match to the strain that is striking the county — meaning better protection against the flu — and there’s still time to get one, according to public health officials.

Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services public health nurse Eric Gordon said there have been 13 laboratory-confirmed cases of the flu in Humboldt County as well as anecdotal evidence indicating a respiratory illness is definitely going around. That includes, he said, a spike in emergency room visits for people exhibiting flu-like symptoms over the last few weeks and a corresponding uptick in the sale of over-the-counter cough and cold medicine.

With the vaccine taking about two weeks to become effective and flu season just getting under way: “Now is the time to get the flu shot,” according to Gordon.

“The sooner you can do it, the better,” he said.

Public health agencies recommend the annual flu vaccine for everyone six months of age and older, including pregnant women.

The latest statistics from the California Department of Public Health show there have been nine laboratory-confirmed, influenza-related deaths in individuals under age 65 in the state this flu season: which started in October and runs until May.

None of the deaths were in Humboldt County.

Gordon said the influenza virus is generally broken down into two categories: stain A — which make you sicker — and strain B. Strain A was confirmed in the two local laboratory cases.

How bad will this season get? Gordon said it’s too soon to tell.

“We are just really heading into it, so we’ll basically see where we are at in another month or so,” he said.

Gordon said flu shots are available at local pharmacies, the county's Public Health Clinic and through individual medical providers.

Beyond getting vaccinated, public health officials also offer the usual common sense advice:

•Stay home when you are sick.

•Cover your cough and sneezes with a tissue.

• Wash your hands often and thoroughly with soap and warm water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

• Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , ,

Thursday, December 29, 2016

Man Found in Manila Dunes Confirmed Drowning Death

Posted By on Thu, Dec 29, 2016 at 4:16 PM

cover-badge_.jpg
The Humboldt County Sheriff's office has confirmed that the young man found dead on the wave slope near the Ma-le’l Dunes in Manila on Dec. 26 is a drowning victim, believed to be the sixth such death in 2016.

The coroner's office, which conducted an autopsy today, is asking for the public's help in making a positive identification of the body, which is described as being in poor condition due to the water. It describes the man as being "a Caucasian male in his early 20’s, with red/brown hair, about 5’7” tall, weighing 120-130 lbs, and wearing navy sneakers with socks. He also had two tattoos, one on each arm near the shoulder. Both tattoos are only partially visible due to the poor condition of the body. The tattoo on the right arm appears to be either an outline of a woman’s face and breast or possibly a dog. The tattoo on the left arm is colored red and blue, and looks like a face of a woman with flowing hair."

From the Humboldt County Sheriff's Office:

An autopsy was conducted on Thursday, December 29, 2016 for the decedent found on the Ma-le’l Dunes in Manila on the 26th. The cause of death was determined to be drowning.
Coroners have been unable to make positive identification of the decedent due to the condition of the body. The decedent is described as a Caucasian male in his early 20’s, with red/brown hair, about 5’7” tall, weighing 120-130 lbs, and wearing navy sneakers with socks. He also had two tattoos, one on each arm near the shoulder. Both tattoos are only partially visible due to the poor condition of the body. The tattoo on the right arm appears to be either an outline of a woman’s face and breast or possibly a dog. The tattoo on the left arm is colored red and blue, and looks like a face of a woman with flowing hair.
The Coroner’s Office is requesting the public’s assistance in making positive identification of the decedent. If anyone has information in regards to this investigation, please contact the Coroner’s Office at 707-445-7242.


On Monday, December 26, 2016 at around 9:35 a.m., the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office Communications Center received a phone call from a hiker who stated she had located a deceased person on the wave slope about a 30 minute walk north of Ma-le’l Dunes in Manila. Deputies arrived on scene and determined that due to the decedent’s location, special equipment would be needed. The H.C.S.O. Beach Deputy was called to respond with the needed equipment.

Upon arrival at the location, deputies located a deceased male on the wave slope. The decedent is a male who appeared to be possibly 25-30 years of age, 120-140 pounds, with red or brown hair, and a tattoo on his right arm. Deputies investigated the decedent and the area around, and did not locate anything that indicated foul play. The Coroner was called and took possession of the decedent. The case is currently under investigation by the Coroner’s Office.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Sheriff’s Office at (707) 445-7251, or the Crime Tip Line at (707) 268-2539. 

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , ,

Thursday, November 10, 2016

UPDATED: Brius Rescinds Cancellation of Partnership Contract, Halts Closure of Two Skilled Nursing Facilities

Posted By on Thu, Nov 10, 2016 at 4:59 PM

A recent protest in front of Partnership Healthcare. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • A recent protest in front of Partnership Healthcare.
UPDATE: Partnership Healthcare announced yesterday in a press release that Rockport had rescinded letters terminating its contract with the MediCal administrator, meaning that patients in the facilities, or entering the facilities via the hospital, will not have to have their coverage re-negotiated.

“We are happy that a larger closure was avoided and that our fragile members in these facilities will not be forced out of their home communities.” said Liz Gibboney, CEO of Partnership. “We will continue to put our members first and work to ensure they receive high-quality care.”

The press release adds that "PHC is exploring non-institutional long-term-care options for its members, including PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly), Home Health programs, and similar services."

Previously:

Brius Healthcare announced today that two of the three skilled nursing facilities slated to close — Eureka and Seaview Rehabilitation and Wellness Centers — will remain open. In a statement emailed to local news outlets, Brius owner Shlomo Rechnitz said his company anticipates a continued financial loss due to staffing costs. To mitigate that loss, it "will be establishing a charity foundation in Humboldt County for the care and treatment of the elderly to directly fund these losses."

The Journal has reached out to Brius's spokesperson, Stefan Friedman, for more details on the foundation as it is not immediately clear whether Rechnitz will be directly funding it or setting up the foundation and soliciting donations from community members. We will update when there is more information.

The path to fiscal clarity for the facilities — which allege a $5 million loss due to staffing costs yet pays money back to Rechnitz in the form of lease agreements and other related party expenses — is even less clear as sources say Brius has also cancelled its agreement with Partnership Healthcare, the region's MediCal provider. The two entities have been negotiating over the reimbursement rate for the last five months, waging a bitter public relations war. Partnership has stated it is reimbursing the facilities at more than the state-mandated rate — and more than the state average — and encouraged Brius to "look internally" to address financial issues.

Robert Layne, spokesperson for Partnership, confirmed today that Brius has cancelled its contracts with Partnership for all five facilities, effective Dec. 23. MediCal patients entering the facilities from the hospital may have their entry delayed as their reimbursement is negotiated on a case-by-case basis.

Rechnitz's statement again put the onus on Partnership, saying, "We won’t be a part of patients being forced to move 300 miles away simply because the system fails to appropriately pay for their healthcare."

The Journal has also received confirmation and supporting documentation from the California Advocates for Nursing Home Reform that Rockport Healthcare, the administrative company for Brius's Humboldt holdings, is recruiting patients and family members to bring suit against Partnership, although Layne said Partnership has not yet received notification of a lawsuit.

In a phonecall to the Journal, State Senator Mike McGuire said he appreciated “Rockport coming to the same reality” as those who fought to keep the facilities opened. But he also said the threat of closure was a manufactured crisis and “extortion.” McGuire he believed the entire situation was “grandstanding” meant to negotiate a higher rate.

“Bullying does not work in Humboldt County,” McGuire added. “We are going to continue to monitor the situation.”


Editor's Note: This blog has been updated from a previous version to clarify that patients currently in the facilities will not experience a change in their contracts. Incoming patients will have their contracts negotiated on an individual basis.

STATEMENT FROM SHLOMO RECHNITZ, BRIUS HEALTHCARE:

Today, we informed the California Department of Public Health that we are rescinding our closure plans for Seaview Rehabilitation and Wellness Center and Eureka Rehabilitation and Wellness Center, and will only move forward with our closure plans at Pacific Rehabilitation and Wellness Center.

As a result of this request, no patients will need to be transferred out of the community. All patients at Pacific Rehabilitation and Wellness Center will be offered relocation at our other four local skilled nursing facilities.

It is important to understand how we got here, and how we have arrived at this decision.

Last year, our five skilled nursing facilities in Humboldt County began experiencing significant financial losses due to the lack of available health care workers in Humboldt County and the lack of adequate reimbursement.

To help drive recruitment, we raised salaries in November 2015 and January 2016, but our losses only multiplied. Five months ago, we approached all community stakeholders to seek solutions to the desperate problems of a staffing shortage that has negatively impacted not only us, but local hospitals and other healthcare providers throughout Humboldt County.

After months of searching for solutions and because the outlook for 2017 was more dire than 2016, we made the difficult decision to file closure plans for three of our local facilities. Despite efforts of some local officials and a local union to disparage us, we took efforts to work with everyone to ensure a safe and orderly transfer of our patients.

In the months since announcing these closures we have continued to attempt to work with others to come up with a different way out. However, it has become clear that the critical participants are not willing to do anything to solve these serious problems. After speaking at length with the patients, families and staff throughout Humboldt County, we have decided that despite the enormous financial difficulty that we will sustain as a result, there is no way we can close these facilities.

We won’t be a part of patients being forced to move 300 miles away simply because the system fails to appropriately pay for their healthcare.

In addition, as these facilities will continue to lose money, we will be establishing a charity foundation in Humboldt County for the care and treatment of the elderly to directly fund these losses. We will be working with local stakeholders to determine how we can better care for our elderly and ensure that they have the necessary care and services locally.

We appreciate the stakeholders that worked with us throughout this difficult process, and look forward to our continued work throughout Humboldt County.


  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Crab: No Guts, No Worries

Posted By on Thu, Nov 3, 2016 at 1:37 PM

From the CDFW website. - C. JUHASZ
  • C. Juhasz
  • From the CDFW website.
You can start planning Christmas dinner — the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is opening recreational Dungeness crabbing all over California starting Saturday, Nov. 5. Mind you, the California Department of Health warns seafood lovers in Humboldt and other areas north of Marin County not to consume the guts "due to the sporadic detection of elevated levels of domoic acid in the viscera of Dungeness crabs." You remember domoic acid, that nasty toxin that more or less destroyed our last commercial crab season, which didn't open until May, and threatens consumers with nausea, vomiting and even death. So just melted butter, no "crab butter" for us. If you can't wait for commercial season to open but don't have your own boat, you might try dropping pots from the dock or by kayak.

Read the full CDFW press release below.
Recreational Dungeness Crab Season to Open Statewide Nov. 5
The recreational Dungeness crab season is scheduled to open statewide on Saturday, Nov. 5 — with a health warning in place for crabs caught north of Point Reyes (Marin County).

The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) has issued a warning to recreational anglers not to consume the viscera (internal organs) of Dungeness crab caught in coastal waters north of Point Reyes due to the sporadic detection of elevated levels of domoic acid in the viscera of Dungeness crabs caught off the northern California coast.

The health warning is effective for recreationally caught Dungeness crabs taken from state waters north of Latitude 38° 00' N. (near Point Reyes). CDPH believes that Dungeness crab meat is safe to consume, however, as a precaution, consumers are advised not to eat the viscera (also known as "butter" or "guts") of crabs. CDPH further recommends recreational anglers follow best preparation practices to ensure that they avoid any inadvertent exposure to domoic acid that might be sporadically found in some crab's viscera.

Domoic acid is a naturally occurring toxin related to a "bloom" of certain single-celled algae. Fish and shellfish are capable of accumulating elevated levels of domoic acid in their tissue, which can sicken people who eat them. Last fall and winter, domoic acid along the West Coast interrupted Dungeness and rock crab fisheries from Santa Barbara to the Oregon state line. This year, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) will continue to work with CDPH and the fishing community to collect crab samples from the northern California coast until the domoic acid levels have dissipated.

Consult the CDPH biotoxin information line at (800) 553-4133 or CDPH's Domoic Acid Health Information webpage for more information.

CDFW reminds crabbers of new regulations that became effective on Aug. 1, 2016. For a complete description of the regulations, please go to www.wildlife.ca.gov and click on "New Recreational Dungeness Crab Fishery Regulations" in the Announcements box.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , ,

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Clash Over Care: Protesters Face Off Over Skilled Nursing Closures

Posted By on Thu, Oct 27, 2016 at 6:27 PM

One faction of the skilled nursing protest, with Allen McCloskey holding a sign aloft. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • One faction of the skilled nursing protest, with Allen McCloskey holding a sign aloft.
Two large and loud groups of protesters filled the sidewalk in front of Partnership Healthcare Plan's regional office on Eureka's Fifth Street this afternoon. Both sides want the same thing: for the three skilled nursing homes slated to close and displace vulnerable North Coast seniors to stay open. The point of contention was why, exactly, the homes might close. 

"The residents are being used as pawns," said Chip Sharpe, who sided with the North Coast People's Alliance and others that blame the facilities' operator, Rockport Healthcare Services, and the owner of the company that manages the facilities, Brius Healthcare, for the closure. "I have a close friend who is in Fortuna Rehabilitation and Wellness. The residents are frightened and unsure what will will happen."

Sharpe joined around 12 people holding signs with slogans such as "Shame on Shlomo." Shlomo Rechnitz is a Los Angeles-based billionaire and CEO of Brius Healthcare. Annually, he pays around $4.6 million dollars in revenue from his five facilities in Humboldt County back into companies affiliated or owned by him. Members of the North Coast People's Alliance, formerly Northern Humboldt for Bernie [Sanders], maintain that Rechnitz should put some of this money back into his Humboldt facilities to address an alleged $5 million deficit Rockport has blamed on the cost of recruiting staff from out of the area.

The two sides struggled for domination of the sidewalk. - MARK MCKENNA
  • Mark McKenna
  • The two sides struggled for domination of the sidewalk.

Continue reading »

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Recent Comments

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2017 North Coast Journal

Website powered by Foundation

humboldt