Thursday, August 20, 2009

DIY Healthcare Town Hall

Posted By on Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 5:27 PM

Apparently unsatisfied with Rep. Thompson's telephone Town Hall on Health Insurance Reform, the local Tea Party People have decided to throw their own — with experts to answer your questions. Here's the announcment:

Calling All Patriots

To Town Hall on Health Care

Wed. Aug 26, 6 p.m.

Fortuna Veteran’s Memorial Bldg.

1426 Main St. Fortuna

Presented by HUMBOLDT TEA PARTY PATRIOTS

Free event   - donations accepted to cover rental expense.

After repeated attempts to work with Rep. Mike Thompson, the TEA PARTY PATRIOTS are going to host a community Health Care Town Hall.

Rural communities are often overlooked and unrepresented.

Come and see how it is going to affect you, your family and the businesses. What is this really going to cost? How it will change the American Health Care system and what is in the bill?

A Panel of Experts will answer your questions.

Seating is limited. Advanced tickets will be available @ our meeting Thurs. Aug 20 , 6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds

 

 

Update via Old Glory Radio Blog: The panel of experts scheduled to attend and discuss the Health Care issue are Jeff Miller, insurance agent, Dr. Rigney, MD, Lawrence Wiesner, accountant, and an as yet un-scheduled hospital representative.

 

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: ,

10 commercials

Posted By on Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 10:40 AM

clockwork orange That's what my wife and I were subjected to last night at the Broadway Theatre before a showing of District 9 , beating the previous record (in my personal experience) of seven commercials. That doesn't count the slideshow-style commercials that precede the darkened theater, big-budget Coke and Army ads. The movie start time was listed at 6:40 p.m. I checked my watch right after the Coming Attractions self-promo reel; it was after 7.

The Cinema Advertising Council, a trade organization repping 82 percent of U.S. screens, brags that revenue for theater ads has seen double-digit growth over the last five years, equating to just shy of $540 million in 2007. It really works well, they say, because, "The cinema audience is unique in that it is attentive [and] engaged... ." Hmm, could that be because we're fucking captive ?

Apparently, I'm in the minority for finding this manner of advertising rude if not immoral. Last year, Variety reported that most moviegoers don't mind the ads. Well, I do. And so do the folks at CMPAA , the Captive Motion Picture Audience of America, who suggest ways to fight back. The best one, in my opinion, is contacting the theater companies, which often have a monopoly on local markets. Here's the " Contact Us " page for Coming Attractions Theatres, which owns all the first-run theaters 'round here except the Fortuna.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags:

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Voting Begins!

Posted By on Wed, Aug 19, 2009 at 4:55 PM

... in the North Coast Journal's 2009 "Best Of Humboldt" Readers' Poll! You better get up in this!

Blogthing readers should take especial note of the two ultrapolitical categories in the 13 up for election: "Best Public Official" and "Best Activist." Very early returns from the Twittosphere are showing a distinct lack of enthusiam for these two key metrics. Blogthinggers must correct this ASAP.

Vote early, vote ONCE! We will take brutally repressive action against proven ballot-stuffers.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags:

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Ballet aux bicyclettes

Posted By on Tue, Aug 18, 2009 at 5:03 PM

winners.

Meet the 2009 European champions, Carla and Henriette Hochdorfer:

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: ,

The Humboldt County Stimulus

Posted By on Tue, Aug 18, 2009 at 10:25 AM

businesses.The Humboldt County Stimulus: ProPublica details all known recipients of federal stimulus dollars county-by-county. In Humboldt, anyway, the education and housing sectors are the big
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags:

Sunny Brae house fire

Posted By on Tue, Aug 18, 2009 at 8:54 AM

This fire started Monday, shortly after 5 p.m. in Sunny Brae. A female resident (wearing yellow in the video) said she'd gone to the store for 20 minutes, and when she returned first responders were already on the scene. She had no idea what started the blaze, which gutted the upstairs of the two-story residence. The woman said the upper level housed the main living quarters, including the kitchen. She's lived there since 2001. A fireman on the scene told her that the cause of the fire would remain unknown pending an investigation.

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Sunday, August 16, 2009

Foster's Humboldt C. takeover - another perspective

Posted By on Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 11:53 AM

Foster's Humboldt C. takeover - another perspective: The Modesto Bee weighs in on Modesto-based Foster Farms' bid for Humboldt Creamery, a business they describe as "something of a throwback" because of the size of farms and the fact that Humboldt cows eat grass. Includes handy box score to compare the two
  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Saturday, August 15, 2009

Plea from the NHM folks

Posted By on Sat, Aug 15, 2009 at 12:29 PM

The folks who called for a gathering Wednesday at HSU to see if there's a way to save the imperiled Natural History Museum vowed to send out a press release regarding their intentions ASAP. Here's what they came up with, followed by guidelines from HSU administrators regarding what they want to see if the community effort to save the museum is to be taken seriously. CR prof Karen Reiss, who sent out the p.r., describes the guidelines as "sobering" -- they basically call for $120,000 immediately and a plan to raise $300K-$400K a year for "sustainability."



COMMUNITY ORGANIZES TO SAVE HSU NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

Humboldt State University announced August 7 that it would permanently close the HSU Natural History Museum at the end of the month. But concerned community members are saying, not so fast.

A group of more than 60 parents, K-12 teachers, HSU and College of the Redwoods faculty, and others gathered at the museum Wednesday night to discuss the closing. They were joined by Dean James Howard and Associate Dean Steven Smith of HSU’s College of Natural Resources and Sciences, who offered to explain the rationale behind the decision. The meeting was organized by Karen Reiss, a professor of biology at College of the Redwoods and member of the museum’s board of directors, to explore whether HSU would be amenable to discussing alternatives to closing the museum.

HSU owns the museum building on the corner of G and 13th in Arcata. It also pays about $100,000 annually for the museum director's salary, utilities, maintenance, and a portion of the museum's operating expenses. This comes to about half the annual budget. The museum generates a roughly equivalent amount, about $120,000, through memberships, programs, store sales, sponsorships, and donations from the public. According to Howard, HSU stands to save between $50,000 and $100,000 annually if the museum closes.

The university’s sudden decision was prompted by the California legislature's recent drastic budget cuts. Howard and Smith emphasized however, that there were other contributing factors. An August 2008 report from the museum director stated that current levels of funding were inadequate for continued operations: staff was stretched too thin to take vacation time, and yet the museum couldn’t shut down without losing revenue. This report requested an increase of about $125,000 per year for 2.5 new staff positions, as well $40,000 for a one-time purchase of a trailer for office space.

Community members at the meeting highlighted the importance of the 20-year-old museum to the community at large, but especially to a generation of children and educators. This past year, with McClean Foundation funds, the museum developed and distributed grade-specific curriculum to all K-5 teachers in the county to enable them to use the museum to teach California state standards in science education. This program cannot be implemented if the museum doors close. Museum records indicate that over the last ten years 25,000 school age children have visited the Museum.

Humboldt County kids aren't the only ones who have thronged to the museum over the years. Sharyn Marks, a professor of biology at HSU, recalled how 600 folks of all ages came to this year's six-hour Reptile and Amphibian Discovery Day, presented by Marks and her herpetology students. Museum programs include other programs for adults such as last year’s Skull Identification workshops and Bee Awareness event.

At Wednesday’s meeting, community members repeatedly pressed deans Howard and Smith to clearly state that they wanted to see the museum stay open, and would be receptive to a proposal to do so. Ultimately, they agreed, offered to develop clear guidelines for what a proposal would need to include in order to be seriously considered by HSU, and then excused themselves from the remainder of the meeting. Discussion turned to organization of a concerted community response that would include 1) a request to extend the closing date, 2) a plan to generate public awareness and short-term funding to keep the museum open this year, and 3) the development of a sustainable “new model” for funding and operations that would ensure museum operation into the future.

A meeting has been scheduled for Monday, August 17, 6p.m., at the museum, to draft a letter to HSU and coordinate initial publicity and fund-raising efforts. Any community members ready to undertake these efforts are welcome to attend.

For more information, please contact Karen Reiss, 825-0465 or karen-reiss@redwoods.edu

 

And from HSU:

 

Proposal Guidelines to Keep the HSU Natural History Museum
Open and to Develop a Sustainable Source of Funding


James Howard and Steven A. Smith College of Natural Resources and Sciences

In an attempt to help focus an earnest proposal that seeks to extend the proposed deadline to close the Natural History Museum and ultimately to identify funding sources to sustain its operation, we have developed this guideline. Please understand that the proposal must seriously recognize and address the severe budget cuts the Humboldt State University and the College of Natural Resources and Sciences are facing. This means that funds must be identified to cover existing State funds that we use to support the NHM.  We appreciate that the timeline for developing this proposal is exceedingly short. However, because our fiscal year started July 1, every day we delay implementing our efforts to mitigate the budget deficits increases the severity of future cuts. Our recommendation is that the Board considers a two-step approach. The first identifies funds that will ensure that the NHM remains open through the end of the 09-10 fiscal year (June 30, 2010).  This time extension would allow identification and implementation of longer term funds to sustain the NHM at a rate approximately commensurate with the recommendation by the Director (“The Sustainability of the HSU Natural History Museum: At the Crossroads” dated August 2008). This proposal should be submitted to Jim Howard, Dean, College of Natural Resources and Sciences with a copy to me by August 28, 2009.

Two step proposal:
Step One: Describe how $120,000 will be raised to cover state general fund allocation for September 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. This would provide the NHM  a ten-month extension to implement long-term sustainable funding sources

Step Two: Describe how $300,000-400,000 will be raised annually to adequately sustain the NHM. Target implementation date July 1, 2010

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Plea from the NHM folks

Posted By on Sat, Aug 15, 2009 at 12:29 PM

The folks who called for a gathering Wednesday at HSU to see if there's a way to save the imperiled Natural History Museum vowed to send out a press release regarding their intentions ASAP. Here's what they came up with, followed by guidelines from HSU administrators regarding what they want to see if the community effort to save the museum is to be taken seriously. CR prof Karen Reiss, who sent out the p.r., describes the guidelines as "sobering" -- they basically call for $120,000 immediately and a plan to raise $300K-$400K a year for "sustainability."



COMMUNITY ORGANIZES TO SAVE HSU NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

Humboldt State University announced August 7 that it would permanently close the HSU Natural History Museum at the end of the month. But concerned community members are saying, not so fast.

A group of more than 60 parents, K-12 teachers, HSU and College of the Redwoods faculty, and others gathered at the museum Wednesday night to discuss the closing. They were joined by Dean James Howard and Associate Dean Steven Smith of HSU’s College of Natural Resources and Sciences, who offered to explain the rationale behind the decision. The meeting was organized by Karen Reiss, a professor of biology at College of the Redwoods and member of the museum’s board of directors, to explore whether HSU would be amenable to discussing alternatives to closing the museum.

HSU owns the museum building on the corner of G and 13th in Arcata. It also pays about $100,000 annually for the museum director's salary, utilities, maintenance, and a portion of the museum's operating expenses. This comes to about half the annual budget. The museum generates a roughly equivalent amount, about $120,000, through memberships, programs, store sales, sponsorships, and donations from the public. According to Howard, HSU stands to save between $50,000 and $100,000 annually if the museum closes.

The university’s sudden decision was prompted by the California legislature's recent drastic budget cuts. Howard and Smith emphasized however, that there were other contributing factors. An August 2008 report from the museum director stated that current levels of funding were inadequate for continued operations: staff was stretched too thin to take vacation time, and yet the museum couldn’t shut down without losing revenue. This report requested an increase of about $125,000 per year for 2.5 new staff positions, as well $40,000 for a one-time purchase of a trailer for office space.

Community members at the meeting highlighted the importance of the 20-year-old museum to the community at large, but especially to a generation of children and educators. This past year, with McClean Foundation funds, the museum developed and distributed grade-specific curriculum to all K-5 teachers in the county to enable them to use the museum to teach California state standards in science education. This program cannot be implemented if the museum doors close. Museum records indicate that over the last ten years 25,000 school age children have visited the Museum.

Humboldt County kids aren't the only ones who have thronged to the museum over the years. Sharyn Marks, a professor of biology at HSU, recalled how 600 folks of all ages came to this year's six-hour Reptile and Amphibian Discovery Day, presented by Marks and her herpetology students. Museum programs include other programs for adults such as last year’s Skull Identification workshops and Bee Awareness event.

At Wednesday’s meeting, community members repeatedly pressed deans Howard and Smith to clearly state that they wanted to see the museum stay open, and would be receptive to a proposal to do so. Ultimately, they agreed, offered to develop clear guidelines for what a proposal would need to include in order to be seriously considered by HSU, and then excused themselves from the remainder of the meeting. Discussion turned to organization of a concerted community response that would include 1) a request to extend the closing date, 2) a plan to generate public awareness and short-term funding to keep the museum open this year, and 3) the development of a sustainable “new model” for funding and operations that would ensure museum operation into the future.

A meeting has been scheduled for Monday, August 17, 6p.m., at the museum, to draft a letter to HSU and coordinate initial publicity and fund-raising efforts. Any community members ready to undertake these efforts are welcome to attend.

For more information, please contact Karen Reiss, 825-0465 or karen-reiss@redwoods.edu

 

And from HSU:

 

Proposal Guidelines to Keep the HSU Natural History Museum
Open and to Develop a Sustainable Source of Funding


James Howard and Steven A. Smith College of Natural Resources and Sciences

In an attempt to help focus an earnest proposal that seeks to extend the proposed deadline to close the Natural History Museum and ultimately to identify funding sources to sustain its operation, we have developed this guideline. Please understand that the proposal must seriously recognize and address the severe budget cuts the Humboldt State University and the College of Natural Resources and Sciences are facing. This means that funds must be identified to cover existing State funds that we use to support the NHM.  We appreciate that the timeline for developing this proposal is exceedingly short. However, because our fiscal year started July 1, every day we delay implementing our efforts to mitigate the budget deficits increases the severity of future cuts. Our recommendation is that the Board considers a two-step approach. The first identifies funds that will ensure that the NHM remains open through the end of the 09-10 fiscal year (June 30, 2010).  This time extension would allow identification and implementation of longer term funds to sustain the NHM at a rate approximately commensurate with the recommendation by the Director (“The Sustainability of the HSU Natural History Museum: At the Crossroads” dated August 2008). This proposal should be submitted to Jim Howard, Dean, College of Natural Resources and Sciences with a copy to me by August 28, 2009.

Two step proposal:
Step One: Describe how $120,000 will be raised to cover state general fund allocation for September 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. This would provide the NHM  a ten-month extension to implement long-term sustainable funding sources

Step Two: Describe how $300,000-400,000 will be raised annually to adequately sustain the NHM. Target implementation date July 1, 2010

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Friday, August 14, 2009

Ween Kills Dwight Yoakam

Posted By on Fri, Aug 14, 2009 at 5:20 PM

click to enlarge dwightedited.jpg

This just in from the folks at Dimmick Ranch:

Regrettably we have to announce that the Live on the County Line show Saturday August 29 featuring Dwight Yoakam at the Dimmick Ranch has been cancelled.

The show was also set to feature Kelly Willis , John Doe and the Sadies and Wanda Jackson . "This is a good thing," said Yvonne Hendrix, media director for the event. How's that? "Dimmick Ranch really wants to focus on Reggae Rising 2010," Hendrix said. "This year was such a great success."

So what? You can't have two successes? "Ticket sales were really slow," she added. "There's a lot of music happening that weekend."

Oh, I get it. Well, on behalf of the other five -- or however many -- people who actually bought tickets for this super-fun-sounding event, I'd just like to say, fuck you, Chris Isaak . And you, too, Built to Spill . And Ween? Why don't you demented jokers go back to huffin' Scotchgard ?

(If I'm being honest, Ween/Yoakam fan crossover seems unlikely, but, hell, there must be a few others like me out there. Plus, I need a scapegoat. You goofy-lookin' bastards.)

Refunds are on the way, apparently -- automatically if you used PayPal; through your chosen ticket outlet otherwise. Sigh... After that Prince show in 2002, Dwight moved into the number-two spot on my wife's list of who to see before she dies. I guess we'll just have to drink ourselves into a stupor while quietly weeping to " Buenas Noches From a Lonely Room " and embracing our custom-painted black-velvet Dwight portrait. (Yes, we actually have one of those.)

  • Pin It
  • Favorite
  • Email

Tags: ,

Recent Comments

socialize

Facebook | Twitter

© 2014 The North Coast Journal Weekly

Website powered by Foundation

humboldt