Tuesday, April 8, 2008

Crab TV?

Posted By on Tue, Apr 8, 2008 at 4:46 PM

Is Humboldt County not thinking out of the box enough in terms of economic development? or out of the crab pot in this case? The International Herald Tribune has an article about a reality TV show about crab fishermen that's taking viewers by storm, literally:

Dutch Harbor, a fishing port in this town on a pair of islands in the middle of the Aleutians, may be the bleakest, wildest frontier left in America. There used to be a bowling alley, but it closed. So, just recently, did the worst and most dangerous of the town's three bars. Now most of the port's social life, and a fair amount of its business activity, takes place in the two others. One of them, the Unisea, has a sign outside that says, "If you fight on these premises, you will be 86'd for an indefinite period of time." Inside there is a sign proclaiming "Where Fish and Drink Become One," whatever that means.

These are not bars for amateurs or casual drinkers. Getting hammered is the whole point.

Some of these guys are also TV stars, of a sort, and appear on "Deadliest Catch," a reality series that begins its fourth season on the Discovery Channel on April 15. The show is watched by some three million viewers a week, making it one of the top-rated programs on basic cable, and it's about work, of all things - the boring, repetitive and sometimes brutal job of crab fishing in the Bering Sea.

A typical episode includes monstrous waves that slosh right up on the inside of your television screen, along with scenes of slicker-clad deckhands nearly faint with exhaustion and of anxious, bleary-eyed captains cursing and chain-smoking up in the wheelhouse.
Here's a video clip from the show:

Read the Journal 's take on the local crabbing industry here .

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Japhet Weeks

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